17

Whether or not there are any surviving SPQR initials inscriptions from the time of the Roman Republic is unclear. For inscriptions, the earliest use of these initials seems to have been on coins from the reign of Augustus (27 BC to 14 AD). Given the limited space on a coin compared to, for example, a public building or a monument, it would not be surprising ...


15

This is only answerable with a certain amount of discussion. To illustrate the problem bluntly: you expect a date well before the exile, and "Yahweh" will be found absolutely nowhere there or then. There were no vowels recorded in the local scripts. And the biblical tetragrammaton YHWH (יהוה) is by far not the only form that most scholars believe to be one ...


7

The inscription is in Italian or, perhaps more accurately, in the Tuscan dialect that became the basis of modern Italian. The inscription is written in an abbreviated form, which was usual in monumental inscriptions since at least Roman times and common in manuscripts and early printed books too — the missing letters are replaced, between brackets, when ...


4

This is not "the" or "a" pomerium, merely a stone marking it (Material: stone — cippus, part of pomerium) and it is found at Epigraphische Text-Datenbank: Detailansicht Transkription: [Imp(erator) Cae]sar / [Vespasi]anus / Aug(ustus) pont(ifex) max(imus) / trib(unicia) pot(estate) VI imp(erator) XIV p(ater) p(atriae) / censor co(n)s(...


3

There is no such thing as "Ostian script". Ostia is known for having been the source of a relatively large number of well-preserved Latin inscriptions (one is shown below). These inscriptions show the same variety of different Latin letters found at Rome itself and in other places within the Roman Empire. Latin inscriptions vary, as one might expect, because ...


2

Ostia was a Roman port, possibly the first of their colonies. As such, the script should have been based on the Latin alphabet, which itself appears to have been derived from the Etruscan script. Looking at graffiti found in the ruins there was a fair amount of variability in writing of Latin characters.


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