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Short Answer Allied superiority in cryptography versus both the Germans and the Japanese can be broadly attributed to (1) better/greater coordination among personnel, awareness of vulnerabilities, and allocation of resources for breaking enemy codes and, (2) the fact that Axis codes were (mostly, though not always) more easy to break than Allied ones. ...


8

Before 1914, the 2 organizations that existed were very small: Army (Abteilung III b): 1908 3, 1914: 5 officers Navy (Nachrichtenstelle (N)): 1897: 5, 1900: 2, 1914: unknown Since 1910 there was an active cooperation with Austria (k.u.k. Evidenzbüro). In August 1914, 21 spies were arrested in the United Kingdom and since no communications were possible, ...


2

As @Alex has correctly pointed out, this story is based on the 1970s megahit fictional series "17 Moments of Spring" about a high-level Russian spy at the heart of the Nazi intelligence and repression machine. But that plot is far from 100% fictional and, in fact, and one would do well to remember that Yulian Semyonov who wrote the novel on which ...


1

The Deceivers by Thaddeus Holt is a history of Allied deception operations in WWII, but it necessarily also covers codebreaking. I'm not sure how objective the book is (it seems to be rehashing some British/American feuds) but it was quite dismissive of Japanese intelligence operations in general. Lots of Allied (British) effort to plant false clues and then ...


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I'm a little late to this party, but if anyone is still interested.... I'm sure the source was Moravec himself, but the melodramatic spin would certainly not have been his. As for the errors, they may well have been deliberate. Moravec was acutely aware the Czechoslovak Communists were persecuting members of his family as well as his wartime colleagues and ...


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There are many operations -- both successful and disastrous -- listed in WP:Abwehr. The Anschluß of Austria and annexation of Czechoslovakia was definitely helped by Abwehr efforts. A rather prominent success was the Englandspiel. Between '42 and '44, German Abwehr basically led all British SOE operations in the Netherlands by the nose. Playing Romania into ...


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