45

Personally, I suspect this is mostly an American (USA) stereotype, which chiefly originates from a couple of factors. We had a couple of large waves of East European immigration in the nineteenth and early twentieth centuries, which brought large numbers of Poles who knew little or no English. As human beings, we tend to perceive those who have trouble ...


33

There is a text written by Luther called "an den christlichen Adel deutscher Nation" (exact spelling!). So the word "deutsch" is very old. However, even from the 1848 revolution on (short-living foundation of a German Democracy that was supposed to overcome the small monarchies ("Kleinstaaten")) or from 1871 on (Foundation of the 2nd Reich), Germans didn't ...


31

The Wikipedia article on the Alaska Purchase discusses the population of Alaska before the purchase: Seward told the nation that the Russians estimated that Alaska contained about 2,500 Russians and those of mixed race (that is, a Russian father and native mother), and 8,000 indigenous people, in all about 10,000 people under the direct government ...


24

One reason was that the "Anglos" brought their own women with them. For instance, there were women passengers on the Mayflower. And twelve years after the settlement at Jamestown, there was a boatload of women (in 1619), followed by many more. The Spaniards also had more "multicultural" dealings, as noted in the comments above. The Spanish religious ...


20

Derogatory racial (for lack of a better word) stereotypes tell much about the people who spread them. For instance, in my field - software development, you are not likely to come across "Polish jokes", because some of the best developers in top tech firms are Polish and Polish universities regularly outperform US teams in international programming contests. ...


19

Swedish liberal attitudes developed during the post World War 2 era (remember that Sweden had been neutral, and had not suffered nearly as much during the war as many other European countries). As far as American perception of Swedish attitudes to sex, this was probably formed during Eisenhower's presidency. With the international distribution of Swedish ...


17

This question can be very much opinable, but I want to address some points: Did the architects of the Armenian Genocide during World War I plan their actions in part as a reciprocal population transfer. Armenians were not expelled from their homes, they were exterminated. It was not a population transfer. If Armenians are now concentrated in the Caucasus ...


15

Being awfully broad as it is, it is nevertheless an issue that might be addressable. But the terminology needs to be clearer. "Jews", in our modern sense, sprang into existence only after 70 CE. Some scholars argue that this process took even longer. Before that we have Israelites, Yehudites, Judeans, Juda(h)ites, Hebrews and so on. Those terms are ...


15

tl; dr Are the Sabean people of Ethiopian origin? No. The evidence suggests that they originated in the region now known as South Arabia. Did the Sabean people truly exist? We have the remains of their cities, including at Ma'rib in modern Yemen, so we can be pretty sure that the Sabean people really did exist. Where are their descendants today? After ...


14

I think you could argue for a fundamental difference in the Spanish and English attitudes toward "colonization" of the Americas, based partly on different historical backgrounds and partly on where they started. Once the Spanish got to the Americas proper (as opposed to the Caribbean islands), they encountered populous agricultural and urban societies, ...


11

For the most part, you would be talking about what is referred to as vernacular architecture. This was pretty much enforced until the last couple of generations, as "architect" is a licenced profession in the USA, and African Americans (and women) had trouble getting themselves licenced. Paul Williams became the first in 1923, although census results in 1890 ...


11

"Latino" or "Hispanic" refers to an American with a cultural heritage from Spain as filtered through Latin America, and says nothing about their genetic ancestry. "Taino" refers to someone with a genetic and cultural heritage from the Taino peoples of the Caribbean. A resident of Puerto Rico could be either, or neither, or both.


9

The history is disputed between the Rakhine and Rohingya, but in essence it is related to population movement between the Chittagong region (now south-eastern Bangladesh) and Arakan (now Rakhine state in Burma/Myanmar), and so whether the Rohingya should be seen as recent immigrants or as indigenous people. Most Rakhine, Burmese and Buddhists from other ...


9

There just weren't a lot of such people in the US in the 1800's, at least until the Mexican/American war. No census bothered to count them, which is a pretty good indication right there. At the beginning of the century the census just counted "free white", "slave", and "free colored". After the Civil war, they dropped slave, and ...


9

There are a couple of reasons. The main ones are lack of a double standard, and the fact that Sweden had its "1960s" about ten years earlier. The lack of a double standard explains the stereotype of "easy" women. Basically, Swedish women (by the middle of the 20th century) had equal rights with men in initiating flirtations (or more). They (and men) also ...


8

The word Deutsch itself has deep roots. The name Dutch is a cognate. If you're willing to reach way back, the word's ancestry can be traces to the proto-Indo-European word tewtéh [1] meaning people, tribe or the ruler of a tribe. Its English cousin would be the word thede, also meaning people or kinfolk. In Irish Gaelic you can find 'tuath,' with the same ...


8

Historians appear to be correct that there is no conclusive evidence of this minority group settling in Bohemia. That being said, it is possible that a Bohemian would have met a sub-Saharan native. There were several African Christian Kingdoms during this time frame and they made their way on several occasions to Europe through Pilgrimages. You have ...


8

A few things that I think need to be cleared up here. First: When the ancients said "Ethiopia", they generally meant the territory directly south of Egypt, what we today call Sudan. They were not talking about the territory we call "Ethiopia" today. That usage didn't start until the 4th century AD, well after the entire Bible was written. This is ...


8

What is a Nordic, Aryan or Slav anyway? The most outstanding thing to observe here is of course to assume that decidedly irrational racism can provide an objective, reliable and valid consistency that one would expect from a scientific concept. It is somehow a lot like accusing racists of being 'not racist enough'? Racism always has to bend observable ...


7

Two hundred years ago, travelling from one end of Europe to the other took weeks or months. Moving that far was more or less inconceivable. If you did move that far it meant that you almost certainly would never see your family and friends again. It was a big step done by very few people. Today you can fly anywhere in the world in a day. Moving to the ...


7

Apparently, the vast majority of Russian settlers went home. However, some remained and preserved their culture. Several years ago, I've read an article about a peculiar dialect of the Russian language which managed to survive in a remote Alaskan area, a village named Ninilchik. Russian sources (https://www.gazeta.ru/science/2013/07/09_a_5417937.shtml) ...


7

The term has evolved gradually, with the root phrase being listed in Wikipedia: Theodiscus is a Medieval Latin term literally meaning "popular" or "of the people". Later in the same entry it states: However, in German, the use of the term referring to Germans specifically as opposed to people speaking Germanic languages in general evolves during ...


7

Short answer: The terminology being used here, is I believe, incorrect. The true Neo-Nazis have not changed their view on Slavic people. What you are observing is the attitude of Neo-Fascists among each other. or some combination of Authoritarian Nationalist and even a form of White supremacy Fascism evolved during the 19th century and became known ...


6

The Nabateans had given up the nomadic life long before the construction of the most famous buildings at Petra, such as the Treasury in the 1st century AD. Petra had been the Nabatean capital for around 400 years at this point, and the Nabateans had been Hellenized since 150 BC--they were even ruled by kings with names like Aretas III Philhellene. By the ...


6

The book Historic Spots in California: Fifth Edition claims the term moro was used to indicate anything black, and that tradition says that a lame black horse gave the name to this particular tract of land The horse story is repeated in the Encyclopedia of California entry on Castroville, which also includes a possible reference to black soil of the ...


6

Jew is harder to trace than Hebrew or Israelite. Hebrew is a distinct language in the Northwest Semitic group. It split off of the Canaanite language in the second half of the 2nd Millenium B.C. There has been a lot of attention dedicated to connecting Hebrews with Amorites. Certain Hyskos kings have been connected with early Hebrews because they practiced ...


6

In 1900 Hufvudstadsbladet (Swedish language newspaper in Finland) had a circulation of 17,500, putting it far ahead of the nearest Finnish language rival, Uusi Soumetar at 11,300.(Conflict and Compromise in Multilingual Societies: Finland, Volym 3) But Swedish is one of the two national languages of Finland so it may not count.


5

I don't know if you meant complete democratic examples, but Alberto Fujimori is a pretty famous example of your request, he lead Peru a little longer than ten years, as he has been elected enacted neo-liberal reforms, then after a crisis his system turned into a nightmare. In US, Obama could be an example if the US itself wouldn't be heterogenous already.


5

There was no such umbrella term in common use in the 1800s that corresponds directly to our "Hispanic" or "Latino" category. I think T.E.D.’s answer is correct in that people with Mexican origins were called Mexicans. But for the most part, there was no distinct “Hispanic” identity, and so there was no need for an umbrella term. Mexican-Americans in the ...


5

Mostly good old fashioned racism. The target is different for different cultures (Polish people in USA, Irish people in UK, etc.), but the general idea is to insult the people you don't like.


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