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From the Wikipedia article on Poland in the Early Middle Ages: Under duke Mieszko I of the Piast dynasty, the expanded Polan territory was converted to Christianity in 966, which is generally regarded the birth of the Polish state. The contemporary names of the realm, "Mieszko's state" or "Gniezno state", were dropped soon afterwards in ...


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One might say that evidence is skewed towards those classes that really mattered. Who cares what the peasants think as long as they do not rise up into rebellion. Some chroniclers may actually write down some words about the general mood in the population re. a king. There is also surviving political commentary outside of chronicles, e.g. (for the Holy Roman ...


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I would start with a brief explanation on how I'd classify township development in the Middle Ages. I don't expect this to be exhaustive, but rather illustrative of the few lines of development that I can note where cultural reasons might cause some variance from another plan. Please note this is not 'academic' per se, but rather some of the differences I ...


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The branch of the Welf dynasty who were Dukes of Bavaria, founded by Welf I, a son of Albert Azzo II, Margrave of Milan, and his wife Judith (II) of Flanders, widow of Earl Tostig Godwinson of Northumbria, are still going strong. One of their branches is the House of Hanover. As for long-recorded male-line descents that included holders of a royal throne, ...


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If a city was able to hold markets, settlements often grew around a central market square (replace with Suq for Islamic cities). In many european cities, this (former) market square, often in combination with a representative religious building to show the prosperity of the city, is still the center of the city. Some factors that differentiated a city from a ...


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The distinctive collar 'snake' pattern as well as the eagle worn by the guy sitting in the centre suggest that this is a Polish uniform: left guy has it already A wire wężyk braid, also used for displaying ranks (plWP: Barwy broni i służb Wojska Polskiego II RP), occasionally worn during the war from its start, in Polish legions, with various combinations ...


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