83

Japanese AC power outlets were first standardised in 1926 with the publication of the "挿込型接続器標準仕様書" (lit., "Standard for a Insertable Connector"), which became JIS C 8303. At the time, Japan was barely an industrial nation, and generally relied on imported power outlets. The leading designs up for consideration were thus the German Schuko and the American "2-...


31

It stands for "Titi filius Titi nepos", meaning "son of Titus and grandson of Titus" (filius and nepos mean son and grandson, respectively). This is because the consul Titus Flavius Sabinus was the son of the (non-consul) Titus Flavius Sabinus, who was in turn the son of Titus Flavius Petro. So as @SteveBird observed, the abbreivations are "filiation", i.e. ...


10

This answers primarily the first version of the question that is still evidenced in the misconception of the title, and thus the rest of this answer is still relevant to read in conjunction with semaphore's answer, which would otherwise re-inforce these misconceptions: Q Why does Japan use the same type of AC power outlet as the US? This is actually not ...


7

The personal name in the Roman naming system is composed of several independent elements. A Roman male name of the late Republic such as Q. Numerius Q. f. Vel. Rufus comprises the following: the praenomen or the old individual name (siglum Q = Quintus ), the gentile or family name (Numerius), the filiation, which gives the ...


7

Jean Froissart wrote And I often, with a little tube, Made a soap bubble fly from the water. I'm not sure when he wrote this but he died in about 1405. Also, there's a picture of a monkey maybe blowing a bubble. The text under the picture says Detail from a full border of a monkey playing a game (possibly blowing bubbles?), from the Isabella ...


7

A quick search for the term: Gebrochener Preis (Psychological pricing), including some Bachelor papers, does not mention pre-war usage in Germany at all. One would have to go through newspaper archives to see how prices were displayed at the time. The author of your quote seems to have produced quite a lot of articles in the few years. Since he quotes ...


6

The practical reason for .95 or .99 pricing isn't psychological manipulation of the customers at all. That might work on some people, but not many. It actually came into use to combat thefts by retail staff, in the days where most payments were in cash. If the Nazis abolished it, the effects of "Aryan pricing" would have been to make theft and corruption ...


5

No ancient recipe has been found, however Dr. Delwen Samuel has chemically analyzed beer residues on ancient pottery. She suggests ancient Egyptians used malted emmer (emmet which had already been sprouted), which they ground and mixed with cool water; this was added to an equal quantity of emmer wheat which was ground and boiled with water. The mixture was ...


4

Then and now, the trained cattle dog. Most of the large herds running in Australia were not as free as the question implies. Large cattle stations and runs in Australia did have conveniently located infrastructure like yards, paddocks, and dams for concentrating and holding animals for processing. Herds would be moved over long distances and divided as ...


3

On my opinion, the best description of daily life can be obtained from some Russian fiction. Especially I recommend the short stories of Michail Zoshchenko (many of them are translated into English). Zoshchenko was enormously popular with Soviet people whose daily life he described, but was persecuted by the authorities at the later stage of his life. Other ...


3

No. The concept that informs this "Aryan pricing" ideology the book seller orients himself on is based on the antisemitic stereotype of 'unfair pricing done by Jews', then (and now, don't search the net for the word) called: "Judenpreise" (hereafter JP). The context for the precise quote that informed this question seems to be an American citizen, not a ...


2

First off, "small scale merchant" basically were the (land owning) farmers around then. They'd sell their excess production to merchant intermediaries, either on their farms or villages, or in trade fairs or more permanent trading centers. The layer above that involved merchants moving goods around within their regional trade network (e.g. from the UK ...


1

The answer seems to be included in your question. Rongguang Zhao explains in "A History of Food Culture in China" (p.18): Put another way, eating habits shifted from sitting alone on mats to sitting on chairs around a table. This made using shared dishes practical. And after coexisting for a while with individual dishes, shared dishes eventually became the ...


1

One interesting example is when the British East India company began to smuggle opium into China in the late 18th century. By the early 1800s trafficking had soared to 30,000 chests annually of opium. This despite the many edicts passed against the trade by the Chinese emperor. The opium trade had resulted in 10–12 million Chinese addicts and devastated ...


1

The Gulag Archipelago by Aleksandr Solzhenitsyn, is a pretty good source. Some even claim this book was key to bringing down the soviet union. see here, and here. Aleksander was an Artillery commander in the soviet army during WWII. He wrote a letter to a friend that was critical of how the government was running the war, and shortly there after found ...


1

There might be a further explanation, in that leaving a vessel on its side would keep the cork or bung moist. Compare with champagne storage, where the bottles are always laid down to prevent the cork shrinking by drying out.


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