45

It's the Wedding at Cana. The text is in Swedish, written with Gothic script (this was common up to the end of the nineteenth century in Sweden). The text is ... madd [sic!], som blir smakelig. Om Bröllopet i Kana i Galileen. JOHannis 2 Kap In English ... food that becomes well tasting. About the wedding in Cana in Galilee. Chapter 2 of John. The ...


18

The short answer is because the Japanese government does not designate the old lunisolar new year as a public holiday. Officially, China does in fact celebrate New Year's Day (元旦) on the Western (Gregorian) 1 January. In contrast, the traditional lunar new year is a public holiday named Spring Festival (春节). Since the latter is a longer holiday, combined ...


10

There are two contemporary accounts of those festivities - "Langham letter" and "The Princely Pleasures at the Courte at Kenelwoorth". These have a certain discrepancy in how they describe this particular episode, but none of them mentions the dolphin being underwater, or it being an automaton. Here's how the author of "Princely Pleasures" describes the ...


7

Our sources on how the Greeks in classical times celebrated their military leaders’ victories are scattered and, with rare exceptions, singularly lacking in detail. Enhanced reputation and prestige, along with booty, land, dedications, money, crowning with garlands and invitations as guest of honour at the homes of the most eminent citizens, could be among ...


4

Death anniversaries are as old as the hills. It is a prominent practice in traditional East Asian cultures, owing to ancestor worship. It is called 忌辰, 忌日 or 命日, all meaning "day of mourning". In China, such practices predate recorded history. Conversely, these cultures didn't traditionally celebrate individual birthdays; births and ages are counted as the ...


2

Your question seems Eurocentric. Why would a culture want to give up its traditions and replace it with Western traditions? Many non-Western cultures around the world may have adopted Western dress (suits, tie, etc.) but still retain their traditional clothing, such as India. Why do Indians still wear traditional clothing when they have Western clothing ...


2

It is not an either/or situation. In China they celebrate Gregorian New Year on 1 January and the traditional lunar New Year as well. It is the same in Vietnam.


2

It is probably somewhat, but not entirely coincidental. We aren't 100% sure exactly why Christmas is celebrated when it is. The leading theory is that the date of Christmas was set to match (or rather, co-opt) a pagan Winter Solstice festival. The specific festival most point to was Sol Invictus. Historians going as far back as the 12th century were ...


1

I don't have a complete answer, but since I see dates like 1892 being discussed in the OP links and comments I just want to point out some significantly earlier references. The 1867 article "Tomtom Beaters, India" on page 431 of Frank Leslie's Pleasant Hours volume III discusses witnessing the "festival of Ganesh Chaturthi" on August 25th 1865 in Bombay. ...


1

It's a difference of emphasis and philosophy. Both Japan and China have officially incorporated the western New Year into their calendars. The Chinese philosophy regarding such matters, however, was "Zhong xue wei ti, xi xue wei yong." (Chinese learning for the core, western learning for use.") Hence, China pays "lip service" to western practices, and goes ...


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