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The basic problem here is that scientific study of cultures (Sociology, Anthropology, etc.) is a relatively new discipline. There are indigenous social scientists today of course (my little sister is one of them), but by the 20th Century a lot of the original beliefs had been lost and a new hybrid culture developed (a process she calls colonial entanglement)....


9

However one interprets "late-breast-fed fools", Sixto Rodriguez is unlikely to be referring to any folk knowledge, nor to any widely held belief. Poverty and / or class prejudice are more likely references. Sixto Rodriguez is noted for his political activism, penning lyrics against "the injustices faced by the inner-city poor". The official Rodriguez website,...


6

The OED attests several use of the word familiar in Chaucer's works from the 1380's, in the usual sense of "pertaining to personal relations or family." However the earliest use attested to in the OED in the sense of a familiar spirit is from 1584: R SCOTT, Discovering Witchcraft, III. xv. 65 A flie, otherwise called a divell or familiar There is also ...


5

I would've still expected the Church (at least in the 16th century) to view these with contempt, issue an edict against it, or ban it altogether. The Church of England does not seem to have ever taken the Book of Revelation terribly seriously. The modern-day Church regards it as "difficult to interpret" and doesn't try. It has never embraced ...


5

Yes. Don’t Poison the Baby With Angry Breast Milk Several advice books suggested that mothers could harm their babies by thinking the wrong sorts of thoughts. The Sadlers, husband-and-wife doctors who collected their wisdom in 1916, blamed “angry” mothers for causing their babies’ colic. Mothers could also run dry by engaging in “worry, grief, or nagging,” ...


4

I suspect it's just a poetic riff on the less well off in society. I only did some cursory googling (searching for myths, misconceptions, etc.), but I failed to find the slightest trace of hints that breastfeeding until very late can lead to low development or anything of the sort. However, Lars's answer raises that late weaning was relatively common in ...


2

I can't really give more info than what you already said, but based on what I've learned about them from the links you gave here's what I think. The legend says they come from a knot made of snakes using their saliva . Since it's a natural stone, found and not created, it would feel off carving anything into it as it is said to already be an object of great ...


2

The answer to your title question is "Yes": an English translation was published in London by Chapman & Hall in 1949. It seems to have been originally published in 1946 in French, with subsequent translations into German (1954), Dutch (1955), Swedish (1957), etc. You can read all about these various editions on WorldCat Some libraries holding copies ...


1

If you include references to sasquatch by first nations in the pacific northwest then they back far further than mid 20th century. I cant tell you when the first reference was but sasquatch has been part of first nations mythology for at least hundreds of years. In some BC museums (Vancouver Museum at the planetarium) there are masks depicting sasquatch that ...


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