35

Revolution and Power As Lenin famously said, the key question of any revolution is the question of Power. Translating it into the vernacular for the benefit of the unindoctrinated: a revolution is done for the sole purpose of gaining power. All talk about giving land to peasants or factories to workers is just that - talk, the people who are actually leading ...


18

Revolutions create instability. Edmund Burke said the following after the French Revolution: one of the first and most leading principles on which the commonwealth and the laws are consecrated is lest the temporary possessors and life-renters in it, unmindful of what they have received from their ancestors, or of what is due to their posterity, should act ...


14

Old system destroyed, new system not yet established When you observe human behavior in large groups, you will notice a large amount of inertia. Let's take for example British political system. They have a monarch, with mostly ceremonial duties. They have a parliament, elected with first pass the post voting system, and very powerful Prime Minister. This ...


10

It's actually very simple. So long as the target of a revolution/movement exists, the solution remains very theoretical: "solve the problem". During this time, everyone in the movement generally agrees with everyone else. However, once the revolution/movement succeeds in obtaining all or part of its goal, solutions have to become concrete and ...


8

The Bastille was a prison where people were sent with lettre de cachet mostly. Meaning, it was only by royal order, often without judgment. A lot of the people there were considered enemy of the monarchy, or at least of the monarch. In fact, there was not that many prisoners inside and most were not politically significant to the revolution - nobles, ...


7

In these kinds of situations, the divide is between the call for "continuing" revolution by some, and the wish by others to "Join the Establishment." Naziism was a "revolutionary" movement, until the Party amassed a plurality and nearly a majority in the Reichstag. Then Hitler saw that it was possible for the Nazis to rise to ...


4

The Third Estate was basically everyone except the clergy and the nobility. Therefore it also had rising merchants in it who became rich by their trade. These are the people who are commonly called the bourgeoisie. The lower classes often choose them as their leaders during rebellions. You have to understand that in the early middle ages, wealth didn't ...


3

Marxism is most notorious for 'eating their own" First they cultivate a mindset of revolutionary reaction to perceived or real tyranny Then they kill that generation; so they cant do it again. Venezuelan history in a nutshell. 1992: They were the 3rd richest country in the Western Hemisphere behind US and Canada 2001: Voted a marxist president to ...


3

Off the top of my head, three well known leaders of the Jacobins are: Maximilien Robespierre: Lawyer Georges Danton: Lawyer Jean-Paul Marat: Physician (informal) and Journalist Having sufficient means as to allow extended stays in Paris during the Estates General was not common; so yes, in general the representatives of the Third Estate tended to be both ...


2

There are many excellent answers here which I have upvoted. (I'll add that I particularly like the point that revolutionaries are people who like us all are tempted by power which they are loath to surrender.) But to those answers I'd like to add a point about violent ideological revolutions. (The American Revolution, like the Glorious Revolution, was not ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible