47

In terms of continuously dateable genealogy, it is probably the Bagratids of Georgia, the current head of which is disputed between three branches. The Georgian branch was founded by Adarnase in the late 700s as branch of the Armenian Bagratuni dynasty, though descendants then fabricated an origin story claiming descent from the biblical David, which is ...


28

Khan is an adopted surname, especially popular in Pakistan and parts of India. It literally means "Leader" in Turkic languages, and can be roughly translated to "King." Genghis Khan can be translated to King Genghis without too much quibbling, so think of the surname Khan to be similar to the English surname King (As in Martin Luther King, Jr.) It came to ...


21

The answer to your question is actually to be found in the two articles you have mentioned. Official figures show that the UK population was 65.6 million in June 2016. A little under 50% of the population is male, although the exact ratio varies by age. This gives a male population of about 32 million. Your first article is about research into genes ...


16

From both a narrative (general history) and scientific (genetics), the answer is No (there was not a lot of interbreeding). (We get more precise as we go from narrative history to genetics, as shown below -- but science requires certainty which creates some confusion in narrative history). The narrative history of Roman Britain, was fairly straightforward ...


13

RI Swamp Yankee has provided a good answer however I find some aspects lacking and some misinformation in the otherwise decent answer. Mongols and Islam When talking about Mongols, one has to remember that later Khans of Ilkhanate and Golden horde converted to Islam and thus their trends and traits were absorbed into wider Islamic hegemony especially in ...


12

"The oldest noble family" is a somewhat fictional concept: When a 'House' starts or ends is somewhat arbitrary, and not uniformly handled throughout European history. There were countless exceptions, uncertainties etc. Further complicated by date of ennoblement, as none of them fall from the skies or heavens, and achieved level of nobility, the following are ...


8

Short Answer: Nobody knows for sure. Long Answer It is very complicated. A royal pedigree in the agnatic (male only) line that is more or less totally proven and accepted by everyone who studied the subject is likely to be shorter by many generations, centuries, and possibly even millennia, than the longest pedigree ever used by that same royal family ...


5

1 million isn't "a lot", it's only a few percent of the male population of the British Isles. But that's not the worst that's wrong with your assertions. Not only do you assume implicitly that no migration into or out of the British Isles took place after the Roman era, but also you assume that the number of children of mixed relations between Romans and ...


4

The ancestry I have found going back from Arnulf of Metz is as follows: Arnoldus or Arnual (c. 540/560 – c. 611)- Bishop of Metz son of: Ansbertus, who was married to Blithilde (also called Bilichilde), who was the daughter of: Chlothar I (c. 497 – 29 November 561) "le Vieux", King of the Franks son of: Clovis I (c. 466 – c. 511) king of the Franks son ...


4

Of course that was the common usage; it still is the normal and traditional English language usage of the word native; not to be confused with modern political correctness-ese usage: Definition of Native: noun 1. a person born in a specified place or associated with a place by birth, whether subsequently resident there or not. "a native of Montreal" ...


4

The short answer is yes a little research can trace the ancestry of Emperor Henry VII back to Emperor Louis III, but to accept that lineage you have to overlook the doubt about the ancestry of one woman in the lineage. And yes Emperor Henry VII has many other descents from members of the Carolingian Dynasty. Here you see that Carolingian Emperor Louis II, ...


3

Your question seems to answer itself. As in yes, per your first source they have interbred to the tune of the UK having 1M or so people with Roman ancestors. Romans intermixed of course - they did so everywhere they settled, just like people do nowadays when they change countries. Populations mix, then like now. Per your second source, only 1M Britons out ...


3

Update - February 21, 2017: A new study ... Genetic data suggest that modern European ancestry represents a mosaic of ancestral contributions from multiple waves of prehistoric migration events. Recent studies of genomic variation in prehistoric human remains have demonstrated that two mass migration events are particularly important to understanding ...


2

The only thing I found on Google Books that seemed relevant was The Carolingians: A Family Who Forged Europe (1993) by Pierre Riche. Riche traces the ancestry of the family to Arnulf of Metz (c. 582 – 640). He dismisses attempts to trace the genealogy back further. He says the most reliable source is the biography Vita Sancti Arnulfi, written shortly after ...


2

While, I have not been able to verify the claim that Tassilon the first was the father of Charibert or any other claim as to Charibert's ancestry, I have found many different claims as to who he descended from, most of which are not coming from reliable sources. Neither of the sources you reference are very reliable either, one is a family tree of an ...


2

Based on archeological evidence, the expansion of Indo-Europeans into Europe went hand-in-hand with the introduction of Neolithic techniques. In plain English, the Indo-Europeans were the area's first farmers. The important thing to realize about the introduction of farming is that it supports orders of magnitude larger population than does hunting and ...


2

Here is the simplest way I know to research such questions: Here is a link to the surnames list at the Genealogics website. http://www.genealogics.org/surnames.php1 So one would select the latter B: http://www.genealogics.org/surnames-oneletter.php?firstchar=B2 And then select the surname Borgia: http://www.genealogics.org/search.php?mylastname=...


1

Your first link is easily answered by asking another question: "Is there even such a thing as Roman DNA, distinct from other European DNA?" The evidence says almost certainly not. This is a good summary of the actual state of the science. To quote one professor about this kind of DNA testing, "the business is genetic astrology". Haplogroup comparisons ...


1

There is a book The Structure of the Ottoman Dynasty Anthony Dolphin Alderson, 1956, 1982 that gives very complete and I hope accurate genealogical information about Ottoman genealogy. Not having access to it, I tried this website: http://web.archive.org/web/20060426191440/http://www.4dw.net/royalark/Turkey/turkey2.htm1 It merely says when the sons of ...


1

I can give you one more name for your list. The king defeated by the Turco-Sassanian alliance was Khushnavaz. Probably. The Timeline seems disputed however. Reading details on the Sassinid leader at the time, Khosrow I led to this passage: According to the medieval Arab historian al-Masudi, Khosrow had before this event campaigned deeply in Hephthalite ...


1

The Indo-European migration happened relatively - emphasis on relatively - soon after the end of the Ice Age. Much of Europe had been uninhabitable or barely habitable until a few thousand years before the Indo-European migrations are thought to have happened. The Sami were relative newcomers compared to the Basques, since they came from the east after the ...


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