75

Short answer George Washington relied on the translation of a mercenary he knew well and who had previously acted as his translator, Jacob Van Braam, and did not think he was signing a document in which (the French later claimed) he admitted assassinating a French military officer. Further, the claim that the officer killed had been on a diplomatic mission, ...


25

is their any other place that could have held this moniker prior to that time? Yes. Washington (population 67,000) is a town in historic County Durham in England. The earliest extant references to it appear in Old English and date to 1096. As your question didn't specify that the place had to be within the United States, this would be the oldest place with ...


17

According to this article from the Free Lance-Star (referencing American Philatelist), there were seven other US towns called "Washington" that were established prior to Washington D.C. It indicates that Washington, Virginia was the oldest to be surveyed and populated in 1749 (although it only achieved 'town' status in the 1790s) and Washington, North ...


13

I passed the question to the professional historians at Mt Vernon (Washington's home). The Mt. Vernon research historian provided the following information, which I'll quote. Interesting...I've been on the staff here at Mount Vernon for almost 34 years and have never heard anything about Washington riding sidesaddle. I think what people might be ...


11

The dialog on HBO is obviously dramatised, but Washington did privately profess to disapprove of such titles. In a letter to David Stuart dated 26 July 1789, Washington wrote that: It is to be lamented that [Adams] and some others have stirred a question, which has given rise to so much animadversion, and which I confess has given me much uneasiness, lest ...


7

If you are interested in some of the actual political blaming being discussed by that quote, you'll probably want to take a look at the writings of the US' first political hatchet-man, James Callender. However, he didn't actually seem to have much compunction against saying nasty things about Washington. He wrote this when Washington left office: If ...


7

The very George Washington's surname suggests that his ancestors originated from a similarly called place in England.


7

It appears that this was almost certainly not the case. Here are some of the things contemporaries said of Washington's horsemanship during the revolution: "the best horseman of his age, and the most graceful figure that could be seen on horseback." - Thomas Jefferson "a very excellent and bold horseman, leaping the highest fences, and going extremely ...


7

It seems he did not say anything on the naming so no quotes unfortunately. But as president Washington was authorized to pick a location and name for the capital city. That he didn't do anything to change the name shows he approved of it being named after him. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_Washington,_D.C. Pursuant to the Residence Act, ...


5

There is a village called Washington in West Sussex, England. According to the Washington Parish Council: Its name – first recorded in 947 AD – means, in Old English, ‘Homestead of Wassa’s people’. This etymology (home of Wassa) is also the etymology of the name of President Washington and thus also Washington DC. The fact that the etymology is the same, ...


4

While Washington was generally reticent about his personal religious beliefs (or lack thereof), many think that he was a Deist (like many of the other Founding Fathers), paying only lip service to organized Christianity. and mostly for its societal effects - that is, that it helped establish public order & morality. What led to his Presidency was his ...


4

George Washington had in total about 300 slaves at the height of his slave-owning career, but only about 150 were directly his, the others being indirectly his since they were acquired through family connections and so on. I think Martha Washington brought many or maybe most of them to the marriage--a lot of George's wealth (land, etc.) came from marrying ...


3

Washington, Georgia claims to be the "first city in the nation to be established in the name of George Washington, 1780".


2

I had doubts of the reference when I used it for my book: I decide it was likely genuine. As I note in my reference, drinking tea from a saucer dates it to the appropriate time period. By 1869, "to pour tea or coffee into a saucer... are acts of awkwardness never seen in polite society." So if invented, someone got some very specific details correct.


2

I can't provide a good answer, but I think this is an amalgamation of several events; I'm not aware of anyone refusing to swear to the Continental Congress on this basis, but I am aware of units refusing orders that violated their charters. First, the Oaths Clause, which touches in turn on State's Rights as discussed in the Federalist period. Second the ...


1

So far all the links I've found about this hotel and Columbus start with "legend has it" or "they say". While Columbus stayed in Cordoba for some time, while trying to woo the spanish monarchs to fund his expedition, he was staying at the "Convento de la Merced" (Mercy's convent) (link in spanish). Then he returned briefly to Portugal, and when he came back ...


1

This is a very interesting discussion! Here is a place you may not be aware of: Washington Bottom, a rural community in present-day Wood County, West Virginia, was land granted to George Washington for his service in the the French and Indian War. Washington visited the area in 1770, and saw "he saw a bottom of 'exceeding good land' and thought there might ...


1

The answer may rest with the statue of Washington that was sculpted by Houdan and stands in the Virginia state capital. The sculptor visited Washington at Mount Vernon and carefully measured him so that his work would be as accurate as it could be. The statue of Washington himself stands at 6'2 1/2 inches, but it must be noted that Washington's knees are ...


1

I think Douglas S. Freeman wrote in Washington, the abridgment of his multi volume pulitzer prize winning work, that Washington was 6'2" and 209.


1

I have had an interest in this reported conversation between the two "fathers" because it involves handleless cups which were standard tea and coffee cups in their time. (handles came later). Hot liquid was poured from the pot into the cup, and then into the bowl (which we now refer to as a saucer) to cool before drinking. One drank from this shallow ...


1

Historian J. L. Bell has done some research on this tl:dr He believes this is a spurious quotation. My ego leads me to quote the following from Bell, which states far more clearly the concept I tried to articulate in my other answer(s). It’s worth noting that the “senatorial saucer” anecdote contrasts the wisdom of Washington with the “zealous,” ...


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