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5

Hypothesis: She never existed, nor did her castle, in this exact name and location at least. The quote in question reads typo-corrected and in context: She realized now that she loved him without reservations, so cast aside all conventions and not only became the quartet’s administrator and manager, but also managed her husband’s love affairs with firmness ...


3

This might match the description of the uniform of the German Infantry in WWI as given by the German Wikipedia Die Uniform der deutschen Infanteristen gehörte bei Kriegsbeginn zu den modernsten und brauchbarsten und war erst kurze Zeit zuvor eingeführt worden. Trotzdem blieb die preußische Militärtradition deutlich sichtbar. Die feldgrauen Uniformjacken (...


12

It is a German uniform of that era. The biggest hints are the cut of it, as visible, the classicist font used for the number on the shoulder boards, and most important: the two cockades on the hat. The upper cockade would have been in imperial colours (black white and red) and the lower in the colours of the issuing state. As the lower one would be of higher ...


3

Territorial annexation goals do not tell the whole story. It's the economy, Stu… Of these annexionist fantasies there were quite a lot going around during the war, and quite significantly: before the war. It was for Germany to become the undisputed hegemon of continental Europe, and as such the leading world power. More important are the relational shifts ...


2

Historical vexillologists do not know a definitive answer. What is known is that the Allied Control Council Law No 39 from November 1946 made it mandatory to display such a c-pennant-like flag instead of a 'national flag', but not as a national flag (meaning also not at the usual position on masts etc). (Law 39 on page 166 PDF, German translation on WP: ...


-3

The by order of the allies since 1945 by german ships to use flag is corresponding to the flag C of the signal-flag-alphabet. Behind this conceals the humiliating intention to let ride german ships on the oceans only with the letter C, standing for Capitulation. Costa Rica made an appeal against this practice, because it is self using such a flag as national ...


-2

The causes of World War One were actually the same as the long-term aims of the German High Command. Those causes were twofold, and they were strategic and military. But the first thing to understand is that the war aims of differing parts of the German state were not the same. The Kaiser, for instance, although he was the monarch, and as the Head of State ...


22

With the arguable exceptions of Austria and Serbia, no country that got involved in 1914 had long-term war aims in WWI. They got involved in the war first and tried to invent aims later. It worked out about as well as you would expect "act first, plan second" to work out. (Not that things necessarily worked out much better for countries like ...


19

Woodrow Wilson famously entered America into the war to "Make the world safe for Democracy." Germany's comparable slogan might have been to "make the world safe for Germany" (and its allies). Germany had a number of unfinished businesses from the previous century or two. In the southeast, its goal was the "Berlin to Baghdad" ...


43

The Septemberprogramm of 1914 was a drafted document prepared for Chancellor von Bethmann-Hollweg. It shows possible envisioned (territorial) war goals including: Turning Belgium into a vassal state or fully annex it (especially including its eastern parts and potentially Antwerpen) Annexing portions of France, force its to partially disarm and demolish its ...


4

Q During WWI, were union disputes the only reason for low female employment in German factories? No. It's a matter of perspectives. And it seems as if the articles prompting the question give a not entirely accurate impression. It mischaracterises one law and both its intended and actual effects. From 1916 on there was a law that specified a form of '...


32

Bunzlau is now in Poland and called Bolesławiec. Back then it was in Silesia, thus Prussia and therefore in Germany. The photographer is given as "Otto Scholz", a German, not a Polish name, just as the address given is decidedly not Polish. His studio is given as: Fotografische Anstalt, vormals Ed. Scholz & Söhne in Bunzlau und Görlitz ...


2

Germany was much less "liberated" with regard to women than other Western countries such as Britain and France. The German attitude toward women was well summarized in the phrase "Kinder, Küche und Kirche,". (Translated, this means 'Children, kitchen, and church', as the proper spheres for a woman's activities.) Other countries held ...


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