24

"Conrad" is not a given name. "Conrad" is his first surname. Franz is his given name, along with Xaver Josef. Full name: Franz Xaver Josef Graf Conrad von Hötzendorf [given names ] [title] [surname] [nobility] [placename] WP: Franz Conrad von Hötzendorf The field marshal, with full name Franz Xaver Josef (since 1910 ...


11

Classical names were given by masters to slaves from the very beginning of the slave trade. Classical names abound in eighteenth-century slave records. Even though slaves were not, as a rule, given new names until sold to their new owners, the few instances of slave traders or sailors naming their cargo before they even reached America indicate that these ...


10

"Conrad" was his actual surname. "von Hötzendorf" was the nobilary particle his grandfather assumed when he became ennobled, but it was in fact derived from a maternal line (and thus was technically not his patronym, but just his title). That was likely a large part of the reason. Further complicating matters, he didn't have nobilary particle for the last 6 ...


10

At the time Europe used to be called Christianity. Most if not all monarchies ruled by divine right. All names were officially in Latin so each country translated it in its own vernacular language, even if some names had obviously no Latin origin (Karl, Otto, etc) : Franciscus =>> François / Francis / Franz/ Francisco Carolus =>> Charles / Charles / ...


9

Omar occurs also in the bible Genesis 36:11 The sons of Eliphaz: Teman, Omar, Zepho, Gatam and Kenaz. Genesis 36:15: These were the chiefs among Esau's descendants: The sons of Eliphaz the firstborn of Esau: Chiefs Teman, Omar, Zepho, Kenaz, Chronicles 1:36 - same as Genesis 36:11 The sons of Eliphaz: Teman, Omar, Zepho, Gatam and Kenaz;


8

In this web posting by Charles Kent Smith, former president of the American Names Society, he claims the popularity of Omar as the name of Americans in the 19th century (as in Omar Bradley) is due to the popularity of poems like the Rubaiyat. They are named after the famed poet Omar Khayyam, much the same way the names Homer or Milton or Virgil came into ...


6

In Russian there is a similar convention. For example, we refer English monarchs by German-like names. I think the origin of this convention is pragmatism. Many monarchs changed their country by marriage. Some monarchs were sovereigns of two or more countries with different language. As such it is difficult to define the "true" ethnicity of many monarchs ...


6

You are conflating many different things, some of which still happen regularly: Transliteration is still necessary, and it happens a lot, often with differences from one country to the next (cf. Wladimir Putin/Vladimir Putin/Vladimir Poutine) Monarchs' names do get translated, at least occasionally, especially by people who care about such things. Thus, ...


5

In my opinion the reason is that all Europe (except Turkey and some other minor Balkan areas) is influenced by Christianity. This religion was for many years the most common factor of all European people, never mind if it was Catholic, Orthodox or Protestant. Because all Europeans were joined by this common faith, they shared the same God, the same ...


4

According to wp, in Germany, family names appeared first in the cities (from the 12th century onwards). Having no family name was still quite common in the 14th century and in the countryside family names became only necessary in the 17th or 18th century. If we look at a few name lists, most Minnesängers from the 12th to 14th centuries seem to have had ...


4

This happened in Turkey, as part of a deliberate attempt to replace old names: Approximately 12,000 village names that are non-Turkish, understood to originate from non-Turkish roots, and identified as causing confusion have been examined and replaced with Turkish names, and put into effect by the Substitution Committee for Foreign Names functioning at ...


4

Estanislao was baptized on 24 Sep 1821 by Father Buenaventura Fortuny. The father baptized at least 108 natives during 1821, and over 2300 in total. He had officiated for another Estanislao earlier in the same year, on 26 Apr, and another one back in 1816. Since he went through names so rapidly and regularly, he was bound to repeat them; there were 28 ...


4

Probably has much to do with phonetics, and of course in case of different alphabets errors in transliteration. So Karel in Dutch becomes Karl in German, Charles in French and English, Carlos in Spanish. Nothing to do with them being royals, it happens with all names (and other words). I never give my actual first name to foreigners who don't speak my ...


3

There is a difference between translation and transliteration. The Чайко́вский example obviously had to be transliterated, and there are different transliteration conventions in different languages. Interestingly, the cities München, Nürnberg and Köln usually get translated, while Berlin or Hamburg don't. Does the diaeresis have anything to do with it?


2

Short Answer: In my humble opinion, religious and biblical names probably became common in western Europe centuries before family names became common. I do not think that people would be afraid of widespread use of a few personal names leading to confusion between different people with the same personal name, and so avoid using religious names. I think that ...


2

When German territory was given to Poland at the end of WWII, many names changed. http://polandpoland.com/names_german_polish.html I had a German colleague whose grandma was born in these lands (Silesia), and she was expelled to Germany after the war. After the iron curtain fell, she went back there to visit her old farm... Buildings, roads, and all names ...


1

A possible explanation is that he simply received the name of the saint on whose day he was baptized. That would be 11 April in this case. Wikipedia says he traveled to the mission on September 24 and was baptized "soon". Can "soon" refer to a six-month period? I don't know. Or maybe the fathers at the mission just had a soft spot for St. Stanislaw for ...


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