21

Just a supplement to @BenCrowells excellent answer, it was partly based on the English Bill of Rights 1689. The Roman Catholic James II had attempted to disarm Protestants, and set up a standing army - anathema to the English at the time. The right to bear arms in the Bill (actually limited to Protestants) was a reaction to a perceived (and probably actual) ...


19

The historical context shows that it intends that everyone be armed, both for the defense of the state and for their own personal use; that the "militia" is intended to consist of all capable adults; that broad membership and independence from a centralized army is the very thing that makes it "well-regulated"; that people were afraid of the federal ...


11

As a matter of fact, I found the source, although curiously it does not say exactly what people quoting it seems to imply: Some slightly better informed claims directed to article 166 of Turkish penal code of 1911. As my knowledge of pre-Ataturk legal Turkish jargon is a bit lacking1 and all the sites claiming against gun control failed to provide the ...


7

The Chinese Communist party has, from its earliest establishment, made it a practice to carefully control weapons in its areas of control. In this respect it is not much different than most political and military movements that are attempting to gain control of a territory or overthrow a state. The degree of strictness the party authorities took with view ...


7

This is quite difficult to really fulfill in all the specifics laid out. Those kind of plot devices must be much more common than a quick net-search coming up empty might lead you to believe. A promising lead, according to conditionals set forth here, seems to be czar Alexander II and Alexander III. But apart from some newspaper reports about Alex3 escaping ...


6

Surely. Just in 2008-2010, the judgments in Heller and McDonald and the settlement in Guy Montag Doe all expanded gun rights in the United States by constraining local authorities' ability to regulate firearms. No revolution needed!


4

To answer your title question, a 150 gun salute would have been very unusual, not just because of the great number but because salutes were generally done with an odd number of guns. The firing of gun salutes is a very old custom which appears to have originated in the early days of sail. Ships, when on goodwill visits to foreign ports, discharged all ...


3

America of the 1780s had to worry about a variety of enemies, both internal and external. In some ways, the America of that time was much like today's "Switzerland" (which has universal male conscription and a militia army). Although (mostly) not mountainous, America was a Confederation of states that had won their freedom against common and powerful ...


3

Germany in the 20ties and 30ties. Even if you count conservatives delivering political power to the Nazis as a revolution. I'll paraphrase German Wikipedia: Immediately after WWI, private gun ownership was outlawed, however this was impossible to enforce because guns were not registered. Especially post Freikorps right wing militias (Schwarze Reichswehr) ...


2

Most gun legislation may add regulation, but not all of it does. The Law Enforcement Officers Safety Act of 2004 created new gun rights for two classes of individuals, the "qualified law enforcement officer" and the "qualified retired or separated law enforcement officer". The Wikipedia article on the act lists several cases in which individuals were allowed ...


1

Bliss v. the Commonwealth (of Kentucky) advanced gun rights in the US: Bliss stated, "But it should not be forgotten, that it is not only a part of the right that is secured by the constitution; it is the right entire and complete, as it existed at the adoption of the constitution; and if any portion of that right be impaired, immaterial how small the ...


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