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27

There's nothing really odd about this. The same thing historically has happened all over the globe any time an immunologically naïve population meets up with one that is tapped into all of the worldwide reservoirs of diseases. Eventually the native population can naturally select similar genetic protections to the ones the colonizers already had, but that ...


9

If you want that level of detail then you'll need to work your way through the British Admiralty archives. Ship's muster books will give you the crew names and should show if any were missing once the ship left the islands. The ship's log books (both Captain's and Master's) should give you the arrival and departure dates and may also give some idea of the ...


8

Yes, the islands themselves had a macro-economy, where each had their own specialties that the contributed to the inter-island economy. Soon, entire islands began to specialize in certain skilled trades. Oʻahu became the chief kapa (tapa bark cloth) manufacturer. Maui became the chief canoe manufacturer. The island of Hawaiʻi exchanged bales of dried fish. ...


7

Yes. It is always difficult for me to say "Japan wanted to do so and so". Not all Japanese are or were the same and the policy of one state is resultant from many actors, actions and so forth. The immediate goals of the Japanese military were definitely focused an the co-prosperity sphere which meant mostly the neighbouring landmasses of Asia. ...


6

Although disease was probably the primary factor, as other answers have addressed, there was another factor that negatively impacted the native population of Hawaii: emigration. Hawaii was an important stopping point for trade vessels. It was not uncommon for ships to take on board Hawaiians as laborers in various roles. Many, of them never returned, but ...


5

First the easy stuff, from the article you linked, it was indeed first reported by a member of Captain Cook's expedition to Tahiti (not Hawaii): The art of surfing, known as enalu in the Hawaiian language, was first discovered by Joseph Banks on the HMS Endeavour during the first voyage of James Cook, during the ship's stay in Tahiti. Surfing was a ...


3

Welcome to History SE, Helena! Once the coup began, it's unlikely Queen Liliʻuokalani could have done much of anything to preserve the monarchy, or restore it once the provincial government was established. Hypothetically, even if we set aside the fact that the Queen was thoroughly opposed to engaging in armed hostilities, in the long run it's still highly ...


2

To add to the existing good answers, it's important to remember that during the period of population decline, disease was far more readily spread and dangerous than it is today. Vaccination did not start to become commonplace, even in advanced countries, until the middle of the nineteenth century. Antiseptics first came into use in 1867, and took years to ...


1

The following passage is from the book The Early Mapping of Hawai'i by Gary L. Fitzpatrick. There is an open-access but poorly formatted copy of the book on ulukau.org. Could the Spanish have sailed in the neighborhood of Hawaiʻi for two hundred years without sighting the islands? One possible explanation is illustrated in a map frequently referred to as ...


1

Context Hawaii at the time was little more than a puppet state of the US. The US had forced the monarchy in 1887 to hand over Pearl Harbor as a lease. Consequently, it had then a strong military presence right next to the Hawaiian capital. Hawaii on the other hand did not have any military to speak of. What is more, the Hawaiian economy and the political ...


1

Partial answer: the last of the four events from Gast and Conrad refers to the abolishment of the Kapu system. Burning heiaus (as opposed to foreigners' houses) has to have religious implications. Similarly, in 1779, after an ugly encounter during Cook's second visit, Hawaiians "burned the structures on the temple, perhaps to cleanse this sacred area."


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