Hot answers tagged

12

Question was heavily edited. Answer is therefore now in two parts. The second part actually depends on the first. 1 Original question Q Was the Hebrew Bible modified after the death of Jesus? Yes. What most would consider the 'Hebrew bible' seems in the context of this question come to mean a Jewish bible, TNK, or from a Christian view, the closely related ...


12

Yes, the Samaritans are Israelites. Samaria, the Samaritan kingdom, is in this context the Kingdom of Israel, i.e. the northern part of the Biblical United Kingdom of David and Solomon. The Samaritans, and other Jewish groups living in the Kingdom of Israel are listed as Israelites and descendants of Abraham in the Bible. However, here is the Judean account ...


12

A century ago, the overwhelming view of scholars was that Aramaic had entirely displaced Hebrew as a vernacular language well before the Roman conquest, probably around the Hellenistic Period of the 4th century BCE, or not long after. However, these views have changed substantially in the 20th century, in large part due to archaeological indicating showing ...


6

In Jewish tradition, the Lost Tribes are not "lost" in the sense that your car keys might get lost. They are "lost" in the sense that a dead friend is "lost". What happened was that after Israel split into two countries, the Assyrians invaded the northern one in 740 BC and carted off the balance of the population (after the war) to Assyria as slaves. This ...


6

The first mention of Israel anywhere is in the stele of the Egyptian pharaoh Merneptah c. 1209 BCE, where it says "Israel is laid waste and his seed is no more". In other words Merneptah claims to have crushed the Israeli nation so badly that it can't rise again. This is in fact the only mention of Israel in any Egyptian records. The reason is that Egypt ...


4

The Bible is written in three languages: Hebrew, Aramaic and Koine Greek. The Hebrew Bible is the Bible in existence before Jesus, that is the Protestant Old Testament. So it predates incarnation of Jesus. One of the best historical preservation of the Hebrew Bible is evidenced by what is know as Dead Sea Scrolls. The first Dead Sea Scrolls were ...


3

The location and time period of Tel Arad seems most similar to the "high places" that the book of II Kings credits King Josiah of Judah with eliminating in favor of a single temple under royal supervision in Jerusalem. It is not clear whether these places were used for the worship of Y-H-V-H, for idolatry, or for a syncretic mixed practice. Reportedly, ...


3

German Wikipedia has a page on him, with references to books that mention him, and there's a more here and here. Google Books has Studying the Jew: Scholarly Antisemitism in Nazi Germany online with a bunch of references to Pohl, and Lessons and Legacies VI: New Currents in Holocaust Research with more. Searching on "Johannes Pohl 1904" gets you the ...


3

The most interesting and most original book in Syriac is the "Dialogue on fate" by a pupil of Bardesan of Edessa (died AD 222). Here it is in a rather old-fashioned translation: http://www.tertullian.org/fathers/spicilegium_3_bardesan.htm#1


2

At least in prescriptive religious texts, Islam rejects the practice of bowing down to anyone but God, and the canonic report about the prophet’s delegation to Ethiopia specifically states that the Muslims refused to bow down to the Negus, but none the less found favour with him. (I am citing this not as a real historic event but as a normative religious ...


1

The Torah is read Mondays, Thursdays, and Saturdays; but it is also read on Rosh Hodesh (the first day of the new month), which could come any day of the week. It is also read on festivals and fast days. However, the Torah readings for Mondays and Thursdays are previews of the coming Saturday's full reading. Rosh Hodesh, festivals and fast days have their ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible