58

This is a plausible description. Probably not 'the norm' in how it went down exactly, but easily filed under 'could have happened'. But it is essential to not generalise this too far. Since the revolution there was a general right for an accused to have a trial. That was copied from English law and survived throughout the 19th century unharmed until 'Vichy'. ...


44

On a lighter note (compared to the suggestions in other answers), possibly more suited to 12-year olds and with no possible covert political/religious/etc message, try: Did Robin Hood exist? Did King Arthur exist?


42

The Anglo-Saxon invasion/settlement of Britain? It's agreed that in the space of a few centuries, most of Britain went from being: mixed Christian/Pagan in religion mostly Celtic-speaking by language Romanized in culture to: Germanic Pagan in religion mostly Germanic-speaking Germanic by culture But how this change took place—whether this was a mass ...


35

How about the Late Bronze Age collapse? It would fit nicely into the background you provided under point three and I think could be explained at an age-appropriate level with lots of somewhat commonly known examples. The different theories (eg. the mysterious "sea peoples") should be quite exciting to discuss.


25

The basic form of this garment is like the gugel, a hood that protects the head and also covers the shoulders. The precursors for these are Roman paenula or Alpine Kotze made from various types of wool. It is not exclusive to medieval times, although this basic style became quite fashionable for a while during the later middle ages, first in the lower ...


24

Well it's a pity that the only civil war your class is aware of is a fictional one between superheroes, because otherwise the US civil war fits your criteria perfectly I think. My personal opinion and the opinion of a lot of historians today is that the Confederacy fought to preserve the evil institution of slavery, however there were and still are a lot of ...


22

Troy You can start with the Schliemann discovery, the so-called Priam's treasure, the realization that there were different layers, pinpointing Troy VII as probable Homeric Troy. Fits into the history they know. Unlikely to let modern passions hide the lesson you want to drive home.


19

Yes, this is historically accurate. Writing on bamboo slips was not entirely abandoned until the 4th century CE---over a century after the Romance of the Three Kingdoms takes place. As the Wikipedia article on the history of paper that you linked to states, the primary use of ancient Chinese paper before this was for wrapping things, not writing. One of the ...


15

tl; dr Are the Sabean people of Ethiopian origin? No. The evidence suggests that they originated in the region now known as South Arabia. Did the Sabean people truly exist? We have the remains of their cities, including at Ma'rib in modern Yemen, so we can be pretty sure that the Sabean people really did exist. Where are their descendants today? After ...


14

Sort of. Chinese Histories are not without records of generals who can really fight. For instance, in the Records of the Three Kingdoms (not romance), Chen Shou states "黃忠趙雲強摯壯猛 並作爪牙 其灌滕之徒歟". He notes specifically Huang Zhong and Zhao Yun's fighting prowess, and compares them to earlier examples such as Guan Ying and Xiahou Ying, who were said to be fierce ...


14

A lot of confusion here, but a kernel of truth. The book Railroad Signaling (2003, pp. 47-49) gives a fairly detailed account of how the color coding of signals evolved over time. It mentions that the use of clear lights did fall out of favor in Britain due to the Abbots Ripton rail accident in early 1876. The signal failure wasn't the only issue, and it was ...


14

Did Marco Polo Really Go to China? There are two major theories/groupings about Marco Polo's claims and publications that he travelled to China with his uncles and lived there for many years. It really happened basically as he claimed, or He actually was in Turkey, Persia or some other midpoint most of that time and his information about China was based on ...


13

Facts Wikipedia has a good account of the facts: by 11 May 1945, the Soviets had already confirmed through Hitler's dentist, Hugo Blaschke, and his dental technician that the dental remains found were Hitler's and Braun's. (as usual, you should check their references). PS. In general, I don't think it is a good idea to rely on TV for any information. ...


13

The hood and the 'distinctive castellated margin' mentioned by the OP are really two seperate features, so this answer will focus on the decorative hem, which was called Dagging. A very informative and well sourced article on Fashion History Timeline. The main definition being: Dagging (also “daggings”, “dagges”; adjective: “dagged”) is a decorative element ...


13

The Kennedy assassination would seem a prime example of disputed history, as would the role of the Mafia in John Kennedy's election as President. The Rosenberg trial would be another. Whether the United States was properly informed of the Pearl Harbor attacks is still a question of some debate. The Vela incident was a possible nuclear weapon test in the ...


12

tl; dr The answer to the question in your title is that it depends on what you (and Herodotus) mean by 'dark-skinned'. There is certainly no evidence of any large black African population in Colchis (contrary to the claims of many afro-centrists). The quotes from the Quora answer will be dealt with individually below. Firstly, your question: Pindar, ...


10

Firstly, your assertion that: > It is said he recorded the last words of the Spartans "stranger go tell Sparta we lie here obedient to her laws " is incorrect. That is actually the wording of an inscription that Herodotus states was erected above the graves of the Spartans. In fact, Herodotus records that three inscriptions were put there (Book VII, ...


10

The stated goal of existence of Soviet Union was to make its citizens happy, and to establish socialism in the whole world (to make all people happy). This does not mean that this stated goal coincided with the personal goals of the rulers (as in any other society, these things rarely coincide). The first goal had to be achieved by higher labor productivity ...


10

The first source below confirms: that given numbers in the past may be unreliable quotes the Lübeck Chronicle with similar numbers As tremendous as the battle and the decision of Tannenberg was, and as much as was recorded at that time, it has only been passed down with great uncertainty. The sequel to Detmar's Lübeck Chronicle puts the Polish-Lithuanian ...


10

I recently read that some years ago, some scholars formed the view that there never was an Catharic heresy, much less a Catharic religion, not even a separate Catharic "church" organisation. All that there (supposedly) was were some major misunderstandings within Christianity. E.g. that most of this article is mistaken. This might be a good example ...


9

Those inconsistencies are exactly when historiography becomes crucial to historical understanding. Disagreement between sources raises questions about the quality of the sources and those who reported them. The risk of not addressing these issues is that erroneous information can become accepted, and must then be recast in light of the qualities of the ...


9

I doubt that anyone has been bothered by this coincidence because it's not terribly unlikely. If there are 12 months in the year and if wars last a random amount of time, one war in twelve will end in the same month it started, and one in four will end in the same or an adjacent month. So unless the opposing sides actively collude to avoid it, a war ending ...


9

Factors I'm using Preferably, it should be about some subject that they have already learned If possible, there should be only two big theories (and maybe a few alternatives with minority support), with the debate being mostly about which of them fits the available data better It shouldn't be too politicized (cuts off most of the "was X real?" ...


9

Who first discovered America? Common ‘wisdom’ in the US is that it was Christopher Columbus, and the public schools in the US generally say exactly nothing more. Prior to that though, the Norse peoples colonized Greenland (around 980 CE), and there was a short-lived Norse colony established in what is now Newfoundland (specific people to look up are Leif ...


8

A few things that I think need to be cleared up here. First: When the ancients said "Ethiopia", they generally meant the territory directly south of Egypt, what we today call Sudan. They were not talking about the territory we call "Ethiopia" today. That usage didn't start until the 4th century AD, well after the entire Bible was written. This is ...


8

Soviet Union in that time? As a quick aside, we would know that the Soviet Union did not use any forms of encryption at this time as the Soviet Union did not exist yet. The ratification of the USSR occurred in December 1922 (a year after the conclusion of the war at the Treaty of Riga in '21). Bolshevik or Soviet Russia would be the appropriate party to the ...


8

The Soviet Union started as essentially 150 million illiterate slaves, and within a half century became one of the world super powers, with nuclear weapons, a space program, world class physics and engineering. It developed its people to be educated, and to expect everyone to live a middle class lifestyle. Certainly, some of the production numbers were ...


8

There are several aspects to observe: The narrated timeframe We have a fictional account of which the author claimed to have based it on her own childhood and that of her father. It is thus already apparently an amalgamation of real memory and imagination of a golden old time in very backwaterish rural area as remembered and imagined by the author. The ...


8

Greatly exaggerated, but basically correct for a video game. You are correct that a fire ship is a ship deliberately set on fire, and possibly filled with explosives, and sent into an enemy fleet to set fires or to simply cause chaos. They were a powerful tactic against an enemy fleet in port to force a battle. They have been used through naval history. How ...


7

This anecdote is quite common, many versions do not have "expel him", and it is more frequently associated with Euclid rather than Plato. Which is more natural. After all Plato did not teach mathematics, and no mathematical discoveries are credited to him. He discussed mathematics in some of his dialogues, like Theaetetus. "Platonic solids" are named after ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible