39

One way to go about this type of research is to simply dig deeper, one step at the time: review the bibliography of the articles you've run into, and read the citations of potential interest. Rinse and repeat until you finally locate one or more articles that argue about the precise date - historians aren't the type of scholars who take ancient texts at face ...


19

The view of Beevor as a propagandist rather than a historian is based on the following points: Use of unreliable sources Use of anecdotal evidence Use of slanderous language Use of unreliable sources In his book "Battle of Berlin" Beevor gives the following claim: Berliners remember that, because all the windows had been blown in, you could hear the ...


16

If you are serious about learning the history of Christianity, you should be motivated to find more books period. A single book, especially one attempting to cover a massive subject like Christianity, cannot possibly suffice for anything beyond a cursory read. It will be "incomplete" regardless of how old or new it is, if only because you're fitting ...


15

There is an emerging trans-disciplinary field called cliodynamics which studies these ideas. There's an open access journal, Cliodynamics: The Journal of Quantitative History and Cultural Evolution, a lab in England, and an institute in New Mexico. Cliometrics is somewhat related: it applies the ideas of economics to the study of history. It's been around ...


14

Facts Wikipedia has a good account of the facts: by 11 May 1945, the Soviets had already confirmed through Hitler's dentist, Hugo Blaschke, and his dental technician that the dental remains found were Hitler's and Braun's. (as usual, you should check their references). PS. In general, I don't think it is a good idea to rely on TV for any information. ...


10

There is a picture of that oracle bone in the chapter Chinese and Korean Star Maps and Catalogs by F. Richard Stephenson in the University of Chicago's History of Cartography (p514): There is also a sketch of the bone, together with a brief discussion of the inscription on pp 3-4 of The Astronomy Revolution: 400 Years of Exploring the Cosmos by Donald G. ...


9

If you haven't found it or tried it yet, you might consider newspapers.com. The site allows you to search topics, keywords, etc. and look at actual scanned copies of newspapers from past years, going back to the 1700s. I went to the site and searched "1936 Olympics Hockey." 6,363 newspaper matches came back in the results. The results are broken down ...


9

I'd say that the original flaw in your approach was to choose the conclusion and then look for evidence to support it. Working this way leads to cherry-picking evidence that suits your conclusion (and, possibly, avoiding evidence that opposes it). As you've discovered, by picking an answer in advance, you can end up backing the wrong horse if your actual ...


8

The usual general attitude of professional historians to revisionist history is ignoring it. Except some publications specially written to refute it. Your last sentence with the question is not completely clear, but I interpret it as: "How can a non-specialist tell "revisionist history" from "mainstream history". Usually, by the author's reputation, ...


7

Caveat: I'm not a trained Historian, just someone who's read a lot of history books over the years, and has learned this the hard way. First off, every writer has bias. Know that going in. So if you want to find your writer's bias, you have to learn a bit about them. Where did they grow up and go to school? Are they from an ethnic minority in their ...


7

We actually have a lot of good evidence written by workers from that period. The bulk of that evidence comes from the workers' village of Deir el-Medina which housed the men who built the tombs in the Valley of the Kings (and their families) during the 18th to 20th dynasties (Ramesses II was 19th dynasty). It is probably not surprising that the people who ...


7

The Unix Heritage Society shows that while diff's man page appeared in V6 (1975), its source code appeared in V5 (1974). The algorithm is described there as being "due to Harold Stone".


7

I don't know how useful this will be to you but hopefully these links will at least lead you to what you are looking for. The British Library has more than 450 oracle bones and there are some links on the page, such as a pdf catalog and digitized manuscripts. You could write them and ask if these have translations to view and they should know where you can ...


6

Much of what you desire to know will be summed up by researching both the history of Marine Insurance, perhaps starting with the founding of Lloyd's Coffee House in about 1688; the history of the early trading companies such as Honourable East India Company (1600) ; United East Indian Company (aka Dutch East India Company) (1602) - ; and The Governor and ...


6

A scientist learns the history of their science out of interest or because it is considered didactically useful. Chemists for example learn quite a few of the older, long disproved atomic models because many chemistry educators think it helps to understand the concepts (I tend to agree). To learn chemistry, the chemist needs to understand the logical or ...


6

I have a copy (as yet unread) of Exploring and Mapping Alaska: the Russian American Era, 1741-1867, A. Postnikov & M. Falk, tr. L. Black, University of Alaska Press, 2015. There are a few pages dealing with Fort Ross, and the footnotes to these point to papers at AVPRI, RGIA, and RGAVMF. Respectively, these are the Archive of Russian Foreign Policy (...


6

It is difficult to say exactly how much was lost. We have some sources that enable us to say what manuscripts were held by some monasteries, for example the library at Peterborough, or that at Syon Abbey. Many of the manuscripts ended up in private libraries, with the best often ending up in the Royal Library manuscript holding. Wikipedia provides an ...


6

Check its sources Outside formally reviewed documents, there is no official quality control to ensure historical accuracy. Individual books may inspire a debunking if a historian is sufficiently peeved about it. This is more the exception than the rule: there is no point in going around and dissecting every book for its historical/scientific/etc. ...


6

tl; dr The answer to the question in your title is that it depends on what you (and Herodotus) mean by 'dark-skinned'. There is certainly no evidence of any large black African population in Colchis (contrary to the claims of many afro-centrists). The quotes from the Quora answer will be dealt with individually below. Firstly, your question: Pindar, ...


5

The archive of the Main Office [of the Russian-American Company] has not survived, and at present only individual groups of documents are known to have come from this archive. -- Leonid Shur in "The Khlebnikov Archive", University of Alaska Press, 1990. However, most of the Company's records from its Sitka office, from 1817 on, were acquired by the U.S. ...


5

Dictionary.com is good for Discoveries. to see, get knowledge of, learn of, find, or find out; gain sight or knowledge of (something previously unseen or unknown): So, yes people make discoveries every day no matter how large or small they are. To make a discovery the person making the discovery must not know that it already exists. That's why when Cook ...


5

You may find the field of "big history" relevant to your interests. David Christian's book Maps of Time is an excellent introduction. This work isn't as quantitatively oriented as what you are looking for, but you may still find it useful. (As an aside, I can't resist echoing the warning tweeted by Neil DeGrass Tyson: "In science, when human behavior enters ...


5

The Durants' work is not history, or anthropology, or archaeology. The claims made are unknowable, in part due to bad theory and method on the part of the Durants; and, in part as the elements of the claims are unknowable. Scholars can use burials or camp structures to look at the gendered division of labour in preliterate societies. To the extent that ...


5

There's likely no such thing. Different societies have different ways of doing things, regardless of how relatively "primitive" they are. That's why we call them "cultures". Take your topic of the roles and status of women. It varies by culture, and is ultimately fairly random. There will usually be a division, as men will likely insist on taking the more ...


4

The event is described in the 2009 book The Guards Brigade in the Crimea by Michael Springman. On pp 81-82 the encounter is described thus: Captain Goodlake and Sergeant Ashton advanced along the ravine to guard against an ambush and to examine the caves. While they were inside a cave, a party of Russians, 600–800 strong, became visible to the ...


4

This is an incomplete answer so far. Any additions and suggestions are welcome. Heliopolis myth is based upon the excerpt from The Bremner-Rhind Papyrus known as The Book of Knowing of the Creations of Ra. English translation available online. Memphis myth is based upon The Shabaka Stone. English translation available online. Hermopolis myth is compiled ...


4

There are many aspects of a computer game - gameplay, graphics, storyline, mechanics, etc. and it is always necessary for a game to simplify or distort the history a little bit, otherwise it becomes unplayable, or very expensive/difficult to develop. For example, I quickly scanned the Wikipedia article you cited and found Each unit that is produced ...


4

This isn't something historians typically do; there's far too much speculation involved. The people who address questions like this are Alternate History writers. There are far too many titles in this genre to list here (try Uchronia), but I've noticed that WWII and the American Civil War seem to be favorite subjects to alternate. In my experience the ...


4

I believe you are looking for James Ward who is credited with writing the book, "Perils, Pastimes, and Pleasures of an Emigrant in Australia, Vancouver’s Island and California." (See: Perils, Pastimes, and Pleasures of an Emigrant in Australia, Vancouver’s Island and California). He is also mentioned on page 65 in a book called Gold Seeking: Victoria and ...


4

A newspaper in Sacramento the capitol of California, probable had a fairly large circulation. If looking for as large or larger papers I figured I would look for larger populations than the city of Sacramento in the state of California. California was admitted to the Union in September 9, 1850, and was included in the United States Census of 1850 ([see ...


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