123

Information regarding mass murders of Jews began to reach the Allied leadership soon after the invasion of the Soviet Union in late June 1941. The volume of those reports increased with time. This was some six months before the Wannsee Conference and the formalisation of the Nazi's "Final Solution to the Jewish Problem". I'm not aware that this information ...


82

I want to offer a personal perspective: I am German. I learned about the Holocaust in school. I visited concentration camps. I have friends who lost family in concentration camps. I watched documentaries and Schindler's List. I read Anne Frank's Diary. I talked to Holocaust survivors. And yet, I feel I haven't fully comprehended the horror, the inhumanity, ...


65

No, Anne Frank's story is completely exceptional - both in circumstances and the fact that she hid for so long (and her father survived). This is a typical case of Survivorship bias. Most Holocaust victims left no memoirs (and no surviving relatives either), and did not even have their names recorded as they were murdered. This is why just about everyone ...


52

Short answer – it was less "hiring" and more "drafting". No pre-screening happened that I could find evidence of (well, except for the general "has to be a good Nazi" principle, which might count towards that), but being soft on incarcerated was strongly discouraged, which led to a predictable result of "refining" the most harsh guard possible. The camps ...


51

Theoretically, yes they were. The first law against Holocaust denial in Germany was passed in 1960, some time after the Nuremberg trials had taken place. As tall an order as it may have been for people to pretend that they hadn't known about something that even many civilians watching the trials knew about, to pretend that it hadn't happened at all would ...


38

Could an SS officer get from Auschwitz to Berlin by train in July/August/September 1944? Yes. Per the many comments to your question they'd repair the rails as they'd get destroyed. Trains might get delayed, but they would arrive. And per John Dallman's answer the rail system only broke down in early 1945 when allies began to attack it systematically. ...


36

Like this Swedish front page from December 18, 1942 it was known. The headline says "Planer på att utrota judarna förverkligas" (Plans to exterminate the Jews put into action). It speaks of hundreds of thousands of victims. Based on the British Foreign Secretary, Anthony Eden's proclamation. So it was reported in regular newspapers, but perhaps not the ...


33

It is very rare for new laws to apply retroactively, even Hitler's Nuremberg Laws. In this case, the prohibition of mixed marriages did not apply to couples who were already married. However, as the paper linked above observes, the Law for the Protection of German Blood and German Honour did include one provision in regard to existing marriages: "...


31

1) It's much easier to hide the killings if they occur at a remote camp rather than executing people on the spot. The latter would probably have meant a much higher chance of rebellion amongst the Jews, Roma and other people who were killed. Most of the people who were deported to the camps did not know they would be killed. 2) The manpower required is much ...


31

The right response is to laugh at it. I don't think this can or should be directly rebutted. Arguing details of a theory that is that far from the mainstream implicitly puts it on equal logical ground with every mainstream analysis. This is ceding it ground it has not earned. There are still some first-hand witnesses to the Holocaust around. However, there ...


28

Across the country, meaning only looking at victims in Germany and not the Nazi occupied territories, these were mainly Socialists, Communists, Jews, “gypsies”, certain religious groups, homosexuals, mentally handicapped people, pastors and priests who publicly voiced their resentment of the Nazis, German women who had a relationship with anyone deemed ...


24

As Denis de Bernardy found the 'newspaper' alluded to by Finkelstein was the November issue of the 'Post New York Post'. The headline didn't talk about 'a holocaust', nuclear or otherwise. The paper is a parody paper, not to be taken seriously, as if the news bit wouldn't suggest that already. But if it would have contained a letter attributed to Eli ...


23

Edit: Yes, they could have denied it if they'd wanted to - there was no law against it at the time - but none of them did in their defences to the charges. Using a defence that can readily be demolished by the prosecution when you're on trial for your life is not sensible. Edit: There was plenty of German documentation available, plus testimony from ...


23

The headline (or more specifically, a variation thereof) was used on the debut edition of the Post New York Post, a satirical take on the New York Post by Robert Vare and the same crew of satirists that also produced Not The New York Times and Off The Wall Street Journal. I'm unable to locate anything about the Elie Wiesel quote from the archives, but ...


22

What are you trying to rebut, that the plaque changed, or that the number of deaths is uncertain? Maybe the plaque originally stated the estimated number killed total, but now it just refers to the number killed at Auschwitz. Without knowing the exact text of the plaque, it is hard to say. The death of 1.1 million is the current total accepted by the ...


22

Short answer - they tried and many (although not the majority) did. Moishe Cohen is partly right in his answer - population movement in USSR was more restricted than in contemporary Europe, and even more so - in the pre-war period. Stalin was committed to his efforts to delay german attack for as long as he could, and mass evacuation of border regions would ...


21

The purpose of to industrialize the mass execution of Jews and other "undesirables". Prior to creating the execution camps, the Nazis had executed considerable numbers of people "on the spot". This was a time consuming process not only for the actual execution but the sanitary disposal of bodies afterward. Considering that the regime was planning on ...


21

He was stealing the Jews' property, which belonged to the state, which in practice meant the SS. That meant he was showing obvious corruption, in an organisation that tried very hard to present an image of impeccable honour and loyalty, but was actually corrupt to the core. There may well have been written regulations about the humane treatment of ...


20

For survivors who went undercover the whole time, her story is not all that untypical. The German term for such people was "illegals" or "U-Boote". They needed helpers, they needed hiding places, they needed money for bribes. Wikipedia quotes estimates that several thousand survived that way in Germany. For a Jew who lived in Germany or German-occupied ...


19

Tyler Durden's answer is excellent. But you request autobiographical evidence from Germans writing during the war. One German of note is the diarist Victor Klemperer. As a highly educated Jewish professor Klemperer was very far from representative of the general German population. However it is telling that his information (and he, understandably, took a ...


18

It seems like the term is Zählappell “roll call”, from the verb zählen 'to count'. It may not be necessary to look for the pronunciation in a dialect or Yiddish, if this was the official term used in the camp. The following excerpt from the Dachau camp regulations (Strafordnung) suggests it was: §3 Mit fünf Tagen strengem Arrest und mehrwöchentlicher ...


18

There is of course no such thing as a typical holocaust story. There are six million stories and each one is different. The Anne Frank story is special because it was warm and personal enough to have been palatable to the general public in the 1950's, while still being sufficiently tragic and moving to illustrate the enormous evil that was the holocaust. ...


16

The movie is loosely based on a real story of Rubino Romeo Salmoni, Italian Jew who was kept in Fossoli Camp and later moved from there to Auschwitz (as 700 other Jews). Luckily he managed to survive the war and passed away in 2011 at the age of 91. Italians, being on Axis side, could follow their own policy regarding Jews. There were concentration camps ...


16

Question: Imagine I live in 1933-1934 and read Hitler's "Mein Kampf". Is there anything in this book that would make me think the Nazis seriously intend to kill between 6 and 17 million Jews? . Short Answer: The way the question is worded the answer is yes. In the original German publication there were ideas expressed in Mein ...


15

I recommend going to Wikipedia's page on the Holocaust. You have two options. One is to read the article, which is a bit tedious. That is inevitable when you crowdsource the writing of an encyclopedia. On the other hand, that article is among the most watched of all articles on the Wikipedia, so it is unlikely for misinformation to remain in there for long. ...


15

It is wrong to say that Italian Jews were not exterminated. They in fact were, but only after Italy was occupied by German forces. Regarding the stance of the Italian government and fascist party, it did not express much of anti-Semitic ideology. At the origins of the fascist party were many Jews, and also Jewish black-shirt brigades of Jabotinsky were ...


15

The German and Austrian Jewish population was about 750,000, of which three quarters were exterminated. Whereas the total German population was about 70 million. But 1941, when the extermination program began the number of Jewish forced labourers in German was 60,000, compared to the 2,000,000 foreign labourers (Fremdarbeiter) [source]. The Nazis decided ...


15

The policies against the Jews developed gradually. The Wikipedia article on Holocaust gives a rather complete history. Complete extermination was decided at the Wannsee conference in 1942. Many camps had a dual purpose, they were both labor camps and extermination camps, like the best-known of them in Auschwitz-Birkenau. It is indeed hard to tell with ...


15

The 1 million figure quoted in the figure only relates to the use of Zyklon B at the gas chambers installed at Auschwitz-Birkenau, Majdanek, and other extermination camps. Einsatzgruppen killed over 2 million people, including some 1.3 million Jews, gas vans (using gasses other than Zyklon B) were used to murder large numbers, while many others were worked ...


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