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It seems that all those sources may preserve elements of how Jean Parisot de La Valette died. In his 1864 history, The Knights of Malta, Whitworth Porter described La Valette's death as follows: La Valette was struck down by a sunstroke whilst engaged in a hunting expedition. A violent fever followed, and after an illness of a month, he died on the 21st ...


6

This order is quite old and previously called Hospitaller. The earlier designs were much simpler crosses and not really "arrow-like". The design is quite varied over the medieval period and ranged from a plain Latin cross to the 'modern' design. Obsidionis Rhodie Urbis Descriptio, Bibliotheque Nationale, Ms. Lat. 6067, f37v, Paris, France. While there ...


6

Jaroslav Folda of the University of North Carolina described the gonfalons of several military orders as follows: The Templar battle standard is well known to have been a long narrow vertical rectangle, argent with a chief sable, that is a white standard topped by a broad band of black. This is the famous gonfalon baucent, or the piebald standard. We ...


5

Jean Parisot de La Valette developed a severe fever the day after he had been out hunting in extremely hot weather and never fully recovered. Valette, who was 73 at the time of his death, was also under considerable stress due to the responsibilities of being the Grand Master (he had been the subject of much recent criticism) and he had suffered a personal ...


4

The perceived discrepancies in question are not necessarily all too contradictory. Most accounts repeated elsewhere of this are very short and just leave out specifics. Further, earlier understandings of the medical reason side were probably hampered by basing a diagnosis on outdated medical knowledge. If he went hunting and got a sun stroke, he didn't have ...


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