17

Concepts of prosecuting a people’s gender war for matriarchy are modern (post-Enlightenment) fantasies or farces of the reversal of modern gender roles. Correspondingly feminism and rights are both also modern social relationships. Medieval women did seek to change their position in the social system. Amongst the second estate nunneries were not simply ...


8

Have there been controversial ideas that were successfully outlawed, without generating any significant violence (on the part of the government or the population) or civil unrest? Apart from the obvious German anti holocaust denial / Nazi laws, there has of course been plenty of ideas banned without much of a reaction throughout history. One particularly ...


7

Finally, I must mention that women can work, drive, and wander freely in Kuwait-it is one of the least restrictive areas of the Middle East, although the freedom of the West is still a little distant. British Medical Journal, 1979 Apparently Kuwaiti women could drive in 1979, which should answer the question.


6

Well played sir, well played! Drake has persuaded me to offer a bad answer. This is a bad answer because I'm going to cite a set of generalizations without either the sources that I prefer or the extensive scholarship of the god king of H:SE. If you want a one sentence answer, growing communications, a broader distribution of economic power to ...


5

Gender inequality is a completely unproven concept. It's more a modern fantasy, not much different from how the Victorians looked at the middle ages ('Ivanhoe'). Very much like walking along the buffet and picking things you like, and ignoring the things that don't confirm the concept. Until about a century ago most of both men and women led a tough life. ...


4

Europe gained limited religious tolerance by fire blood murder starvation war and rape. The guarantee of religious tolerance is cuius regio eius religio: that the nature of the person of the sovereign dictates the religion of the sovereign's realm. Between princes, religious toleration was obligatory due to violence. Firstly in the Peace of Augsburg (1555)...


4

Fascinating question. Revocation of voting rights of convicted Criminals is based on "civil death", which is explained further at PROCON. British common law gave the government the right to revoke voting rights. I'm not aware of the framers explicitly addressing the issue, but they did discuss a more democratic franchise. My recollection is that they ...


4

First, let's clarify; declaring something illegal does not prevent people from doing that thing. Burglary is illegal, but it happens. Sexual harassment is illegal, but it happens. So all of the examples listed are... not really relevant to understanding or answering the question. The examples lead more to confusion than resolution. Second you are citing ...


3

No, it was not possible Equality in this world was a concept completely alien to Middle Ages. In those times people were sharply divided between social strata (monarchs, nobility, clergy, peasants, city dwellers etc ...) There was very little chance for social mobility (for example for peasant to became noble) . Society was held together by religion which ...


3

In Germany and Austria there are laws against reviving the Nazi ideology. As an Austrian I am not aware of any violence involved in enforcing these laws. Every once in a while, people are sentenced to jail or fined. However, physical violence is rarely if ever involved. On a general note, all laws require a certain extent of (legal) force to be, and remain, ...


3

@Dohn Joe has the correct answer; enforcement of law is, by definition, violence. Government is a monopoly on the use of violence; law is legalized violence. The question is a tautology. In the body of your question you change the context to "leads to civil unrest". If the question is, "Have governmental laws restricting free speech suppressed an idea ...


3

Why wasn't the 1953 Iranian coup d’état considered [by the UN Security Council] to be a violation of United Nations Charter? It doesn't seem to have come up. Resolutions adopted by the Security Council in 1953 S/RES/103 (1953) International Court of Justice S/RES/102 (1953) International Court of Justice S/RES/101 (1953) The ...


3

In a rather simplistic answer, because of bourgeoisie. The French Revolution was a commons revolt, but we need to remember that not all "commons" where poor. Bourgeois where commons, in the third estate. As they are rich, they are stronger political and ideological players that could patronage thinkers and artists that supports the overthrow of society based ...


3

Review the definition of Human Shield in wikipedia; there are multiple examples of countries using their own population, or that of their allies as human shields. Note that almost every example is contested by one side or the other. This is in part because it would violate the Geneva convention. During interrogation by Allied intelligence officers in ...


3

I'm not even attempting to answer the whole question, just want to give example of a country which managed to avoid the bloody religious wars of Germany or France ( other answer implies that it was the only way to reach religious tolerance ). That country was Polish - Lithuanian Commonwealth, which spanned a large chunk of Europe, and was mostly Catholic, ...


2

Wikipedia has an excellent overview of the history of religious tolerance from antiquity to the modern day. (Unfortunately, it seems to have been ham-handedly shoe-horned into the entry for Tolerance, which is a political science thing unto itself. Gotta love the never-ending Wiki edit wars...) Here is another, under the heading of "Christian Debate on ...


2

(I have limits on how many references I can add. I will bold important terms that have useful Wikipedia pages) The UN Universal Declaration of Human Rights represents the first global expression of rights to which all human beings are inherently entitled. It was signed in 1948 by the UN General Assembly. It elaborates on the ideas of: 1. US President ...


1

In Germany, holocaust denial is illegal (as is using Nazi symbols, except for in a context of art or science). Some people have spent short jail sentences for this, which may or may not count as violence for enforcement for you. However, I don't see signs of any broader negative impacts, where outlawing one negative opinion would lead to outlawing more, or ...


1

The turning point was not the French revolution but American revolution which happened 13 years earlier. The Declaration of Independence (1776) is the first official political document where these rights (for all) are mentioned. The idea should probably be credited to French philosophers of 1700s. Human rights (in the sense of the rights of ALL humans) ...


1

What you mean is not humanism by any definition. One can call it tolerance or pluralism. In ancient, polytheistic world it was quite common: people tended to believe that all deities worshiped by other peoples also existed. They were seen either as local deities or just other names for the already known deities. It was the spread of Abrahamic religions ...


1

Well you can look on the Amnesty International web site, I found a description page there on Prisoners of Conscience that links to individuals. As to individual lists you can across one at Wikipedia but I also found at least one on their site for Cuba that lists many people. You can probably find others, though I didn't do an indepth look on the site. As ...


1

Ugarkina of Lagash, circa the 24th century BCE, is generally credited* as the first effective reformer in recorded history to grant broad legal rights to commoners, the poor and disabled, and elevate many more women into the ranks of the political elite while reigning in secular corruption and abuse of power by wealthy landowners and the priestly class. ...


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