116

Google image search brings this up pretty easily. (Image recognition technology is amazing these days.) It is The Abduction of Orithyia by Boreas, a late 17th century tapestry. I gather it's currently in storage at a San Francisco museum rather than at a New England mansion.


56

It's a 1 Baht coin from Thailand, between 1957 and 1962: Source: coinquest.com See also "Reading Thai Numbers and Dates" by Portland Coins.


53

I don't know uniforms well enough to be completely affirmative, but all your clues and the physionomy of the boy remind me of French Imperial Prince Napoleon, son of Napoleon III. He was born in 1856 and the pictures on his wiki page show a strong ressemblance (in my humble opinion) with the boy on your photo. On this picture, he even wears a similar ...


46

Postcards produced on Kodak Professional AZO paper had 'AZO stamp boxes' on the reverse. The style of these boxes varied over time. In this case, we have four triangles in the corners of the stamp box, two 'up' and two 'down'. This suggests that the card was produced in the date-range 1918-1930. The ship name on the reverse appears to be 'USS Marica'. A ...


43

It's the Wedding at Cana. The text is in Swedish, written with Gothic script (this was common up to the end of the nineteenth century in Sweden). The text is ... madd [sic!], som blir smakelig. Om Bröllopet i Kana i Galileen. JOHannis 2 Kap In English ... food that becomes well tasting. About the wedding in Cana in Galilee. Chapter 2 of John. The ...


42

The website apparently originating this image has a fuller/bigger version of it: From that we can conclude a few things: The helmet wearing people are 'old warriors'. Since they are not even showing a face it stands to reason that the prophet himself and Ali are either meant or alluded to (a really strict observance of rules would even forbid that what ...


39

This a picture called "La foire du Lendit" Pontifical de Sens, France, 14th century BnF Ms. Latin 962, fol. 264 Source: Medieval Trade and Travel: Home And can be dated with additional detail to found here. That image is at the source here, at the Bibliothèque nationale de France: La foire du Lendit Pontifical de Sens, France, XIVe ...


38

It was in Glasgow in 1957, as part of the city's fight against tuberculosis. It's worth noting that the X-Ray machines weren't actually on the tram. It was simply used to advertise the campaign. [Image source Wellcome Collection CC BY] Mobile X-Ray units were used in the UK (the Mass Miniature Radiography (MMR) programme), but in vans, rather than trams. ...


35

It is, in fact, a twin-engined American P38 Lightning: That particular aircraft was shot down on 27 January 27 1944. The wreck is located in Lecques Bay at a depth of about 40 meters, about one kilometre west of Grenier Point. The wreck was discovered in November 1996, and identified as G15-LO (serial number 43-2545) flown by 2nd Lt. Harry Greenup of 49th ...


34

It might be a Confederate flag, specifically the Van Dorn battle flag: Quoting its wikipedia description: The Van Dorn battle flag is a historical Confederate flag with a red field depicting a white crescent moon in the canton and thirteen white stars; and trimmed with gold cord. In February, 1862, Confederate general Earl Van Dorn ordered that all units ...


34

Confirming Brian Z and his answer: this is most likely a penumatic tube mail system. And strictly speaking: "What is the object moving…?" – It's not a "cuboid box" but a cylindrical container, also called capsule. Most easily visible in this still: You see a darker edge on top, a lighter reflection of light at the bottom of the tube. On the right is a ...


32

It's a Cветец (Svetetz), a device for holding a primitive torch called a Лучина (Luchina - splinter) or Rushlight, really just a splinter of wood or a piece of plant fiber dipped in grease. The Svetetz would need to be placed in a pool of water to prevent dropped ashes from starting a fire, so that could explain the raised yoke-like sides of the wooden ...


31

1400 A notable feature of this map is the English possession of Western France, which means that it's no later than 1453, when France took Bordeaux. Since in the Diplomacy game you color only the ownership of "supply centers" (represented by circles on the map, the larger industrial/population centres) this is consistent with France owning Paris, Rouen and ...


30

A similar item was sold at an auction site here. The item listed on that site is called a 'wild meat clamp' and is described as made to hold chicken legs or leg-of-lamb. The French term Manche a Gigot (Thanks @LangLangC) will lead to many more examples in a search.


28

A tuareg takooba sword, maybe Scabbard and half-moon markings on the blade are reasonably similar to a tuareg takooba sword shown on antiqueswordsonline. See images below: note that the half-moon markings appear at the same place as on the sword above, where the two outer fullers (grooves) end. From a general description: "The typical blade tapers, ...


28

This is a Taiwanese bankote with a face value of TWD $10. It depicts Dr Sun Yat-sen with the Presidential Office in Taipei on the reverse. The text says "Bank of Taiwan", the issuing authority, and "Year 59 of the Republic", i.e. 1960 in the Common Era. This date identifies when the printing plates were designed, not when the specific note was printed or ...


28

The machine the tractor is pulling is a grain reaper-binder, possibly a McCormick-Deering. The reaper-binder, or binder, is a farm implement that improved upon the simple reaper. The binder was invented in 1872 by Charles Baxter Withington, a jeweler from Janesville, Wisconsin. In addition to cutting the small-grain crop, a binder also 'binds' the stems ...


27

The design is that of the "sailing ship" 10 Deutsche Mark note, a banknote first issued in 1960. The front features a 16th century painting by Lucas Cranach the Elder. On a real version of the note, the reverse would have depicted a barque of the same type like the German navy sailing ship Gorch Fock, officially meant to represent German openness to the ...


25

From the portrait, it looks to be a William I (William the Conqueror) "bonnet-type" silver penny. However, you should also be aware that there are a lot of replica and reproduction issues of that particular coin. As noted by @SimonB and @richardb in the comments, your coin appears to have the letters 'WRL' stamped on the obverse, which indicates that it is ...


25

It looks to be a photograph of Abdül Aziz, the 32nd Sultan of the Ottoman Empire. He reigned between 25 June 1861 and 30 May 1876, which fits with the 1866 date. Here is a similar photograph by an unknown photographer from the National Portrait gallery collection: © National Portrait Gallery, London, Creative commons licence CC BY-NC-ND 3.0


25

The three man are, also according to the text, the three rectors present at a faculty meeting. The staffs they are carrying are rectorial staffs ("Rektorstab"), symbolising their honour and autonomous power over jurisdiction in matters regarding the university. It seems that in English this is similar to a staff of office and similar to ceremonial maces. ...


25

The image shows shows the Fair at Lendit in France. It is taken from a 15th century manuscript held at the Bibliotheque Nationale in Paris France. MS Latin 962 folio 264. The suggested date for the manuscript is 1405-1410, which should help narrow down your research. The whole manuscript has been scanned, and is available online. From the description: ...


25

These are Polish Army Uniforms, starting around 1919. Unfortunately the main wiki pages show no Uniforms of the times. To my knowledge, these types of zig-zag collars (Polish only, but translates well to English) were in use sometime after 1918 until 1939 and are also unique to the Polish Army. Other photo collections, without dates show the simularity of ...


24

Scanning through samples of the List of US Destroyer Classes and List of US Cruiser Classes for examples of the 2-and-2 funnel arrangement and unusual bow-turret combination reveals the Omaha-class (light) Cruiser as the only US warship class that fits: Note the matching 2-and-2 funnel arrangement, stacked single-barrelled casemates to port and starboard on ...


24

Regarding place and date: The picture was taken in Blaubeuren, Germany. In the background, a part of the Blaubeuren Abbey is visible (its western portal): Source: Wikipedia Commons, Schilling Thomas (Own Work) [CC BY-SA 4.0] (https://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-sa/4.0) The place is about 100 meters south of the „Blautopf“, a famous little pond in ...


24

Got it, is a Spanish M1969 Bayonet, check it here: https://www.preferredarms.com/weapons/daggers.php


24

That's a pneumatic tube. The tube itself is transparent in this case, but the object you see moving through it is a capsule carrying documents, or maybe cash or other small objects. They are still used in some places (in that link, for delivering food), but were a common feature of most offices before the rise of computers and digital technology.


23

I agree with Kobunite, but by a different route. I can't make out the cap badge well enough to identify it positively, but the collar badges are either Royal Artillery or Royal Engineers, which are quite similar. The cap badge definitely isn't Royal Artillery, which looks like this: So he's Royal Engineers. The uniform is that of a commissioned officer: the ...


21

It's a Valentine tank: The Tank, Infantry, Mk III, Valentine was an infantry tank produced in the United Kingdom during the Second World War. More than 8,000 of the type were produced in eleven marks, plus various specialised variants, accounting for approximately a quarter of wartime British tank production.2 The many variants included riveted and ...


21

Those seem like the mitre caps which would be part of grenadier uniform in many armies of the time, including imperial Russia. I don't have a good source there but here's an example of a very similar uniform from a Russian grenadier regiment. Here are grenadiers of three British regiments from what appears to be the late 18th century: The hats don't have ...


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