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0

In the first photograph, I believe this is a US Army uniform; compare to the example jacket seen here. The second photo gives us a bit more detail, as the jacket has a branch of service badge on his left lapel. It's a bit out of focus, but we can see the general shape of an "X". This seems to be the two crossed cannons of the Field Artillery, or ...


4

The ten-pointed star on the lapel, and cap form makes this image readily identifiable to anyone familiar with the American Legion organization. The three digit number indicates the 'Post' the individual belonged to, with this one indicating a connection to Johnston, Polk County, Iowa (part of Des Moines metro area). Not enough detail at this resolution to ...


5

It matches the description of a US M70 57mm AP-T (Armor Piercing with Tracer) shot which has lost its rifling band. The M70 AP Projectile is a solid shot of hardened steel with a cavity machined into the base to receive a tracer. The ogive is continued to a point, and has a radius of 3.14 inches. A waved or knurled recess 0.79 inch wide is machined into the ...


6

@Jan points out that the uniform and equipment look like the First World War British uniforms, which would mean that they are in a British or British Empire unit, and that the hat seems to be the distinctive one worn by New Zealand forces. Having established he's probably a New Zealander, we can identify his unit in more detail from the cap badge on his hat. ...


-1

Actually your Great Great Grandfather is a soldier from the state of Baden and it seems to date just before or during the war of 1870 when Baden had military sovereignty though they heavily followed the uniform changes in Prussia like many other kingdoms and states. Now to go into detail on the table is the 1860 model Pickelhaube with the Baden emblem which ...


6

This question is probably not completely answerable, but let's see how far we can get with some reasonable assumptions. The object seems to have been made out of a brass cartridge case for an artillery shell. If it is "trench art", that implies it was done by hand, without power tools. That makes it unlikely that its diameter has changed much, and ...


7

Not sure about the movie, but here is the web page of family of the original photographer, and their version of your image It is a cinema at Caxias do Sul, Rio Grande do Sul, Brasil. Certainly it makes sense that the word at the bottom of the poster is HOJE (today). The webpage dates the picture to 1904, but, if you accept that the date may be wrong, I have ...


6

In the second photo he also seems to sport an RAF single wing device on the left side – this the correct placement. This could be any of several what are known as brevet devices, but are correctly aircrew flying badges, for examples: Signallers Wing (with the letter S in the center wreath), Wireless Air Gunner (with the letters WAG in the center wreath), ...


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