30

tl; dr Virtually all the Third Class (steerage) passengers were intending to emigrate. The majority were headed to the United States, while the rest intended to journey onward to Canada. For passengers in steerage, their voyage on the Titanic was intended to be a one-way trip. The vast majority of Second Class ticket holders, who were not already US ...


29

Many Italians emigrated to Argentina because many Italians emigrated. Argentina, like Brazil and the United States could offer economic opportunities not to be found in the old country, but equally importantly, had policies that were open to immigration. Italian Emigration 1876-1926 Many Italians left Italy in the late 19th and early 20th centuries; it is ...


22

The question as it was posed is not entirely accurate. The Sephardic Jews are, rightly, the most famous Jewish community of the Ottoman Empire. However, in Istanbul, you could find synagogues and associations belonging to Ashknazi immigrants from Europe. These were all pre-Zionist immigrants from, if memory serves, Russia. In fact, there was a power struggle ...


21

Short answer This was a requirement for all "natives, citizens, denizens, or subjects" of the German (and, a few months later, the Austro-Hungarian) Empire; thus, 'alien enemy' registration was not about targeting individuals and - for the vast majority - did not lead to internment. It did mean, though, that thousands of people's lives were adversely ...


19

Jews had traditionally been a wide-ranging people. They had centers in Europe, Asia Minor, and even India. (When Thomas went to India in 52 AD, for example, he did so in part because there was already a thriving Jewish community.) Starting in the 50s and 60s AD, many Jews were already being run out of the Israel (think Masada and all that). In 125 AD, ...


16

Farming societies typically support 60 to 100 times the population of hunter-gatherer societies. Given that kind of population difference, what that one person wants/needs vs. the 100 simply doesn't matter. They become unimportant on the ground, and are simply genetically and socially washed away in the tide. The hunter's options are to retreat to unfarmed ...


15

The time period from roughly 7500 BP (years Before Present) to 4000 BP (5500 BCE to 2000 BCE), known as the Holocene Maximum (or Optimum) saw global temperatures: rapidly increase from slightly (~0.5°C) below current the present value to between 1 and 2°C higher; stay at those values for nearly 2000 years; and then return to values ~0.5°C below current. (...


13

Yes, there were. The Russian-American Company sent a party of prospectors comprised of four Russians and six Tlingit indians led by a Lt P.P. Doroshin: Doroshin and 10 RAC employees sailed to California aboard the Prince Menshikov, which arrived in the overnight boom town of San Francisco on December 21, 1848. In January, 1849, Doroshin set out with ...


13

Because people from "third world" countries had limited access to "first world" countries until recently (about 1950). The century from about 1850-1950 was the period of European colonialism or imperialism. Basically, the Europeans set the rules. They could go anywhere in the world where the gunboats would take them, and refuse entry to their countries to ...


13

tl; dr The fact that your ancestor has a "Registration Affidavit of Alien Enemy" document on file doesn't mean that they had actually done anything wrong. All German immigrants who weren't naturalised US citizens had to complete the registration. If there had been suspicion that he was a German sympathiser he might also have been interned for the duration ...


12

I wonder whether what you're recalling was the battle waged against Einstein by the Woman Patriot Corporation. The "corporation" was anti-suffragette in character, possibly anti-Jewish and certainly anti-communist and anti-pacifist. In 1932 the organisation filed a memorandum complaining about Einstein's return to the United States. They claimed, according ...


12

It is a question of contacts. Where are you to move, and how? In general you move to where you have friends, contacts and where you can speak a language. And moving a long way with all your possessions is costly and takes time.


12

I could imagine, it is a kind of spiritual home. Jews immigrated from Muslim countries to Muslim countries (ok, Spain was Christian when the Jews were banished, but it was a new thing, and the Jews remembered on the better days under Muslim authority.) When Jews were evicted from Central/Eastern Europe they looked for similar societies to settle. They had ...


11

There wasn't enough work. This was originally a problem created by slave labor: wealthy nobles owned slaves and large estates, and small farmers could not compete with them. They had to sell their land or work for a wealthy patrician, and a lot of them eventually gave up and moved to the city. This was a constant source of civil unrest in Rome and quite a ...


10

Here's my proposition, basically it's just a set of Caucasus characteristics making this region especially interesting. By which we mean: there're numerous languages, 3 distinct language families, characteristic just for this region. My first point is, language diversity / fragmentation is normal for regions without a strong state / commerce / any unifying ...


10

The answer is simple - the US population is not primarily British in descent. The states have had large numbers of immigrants from all over Europe. Canada, New Zealand, and Australia have a much higher proportion of the population directly descended from British settlers, there was very little Eastern European movement to British colonies as they were just ...


10

There's no scientific definition of "race", so that part of the question is unanswerable. Linguists do try to classify languages though, since that can be done (mostly) objectively, based on similarity of grammar and words. One popular theory has been Turkic languages and Mongolic languages are part of a larger family of languages, named Altaic. Today ...


10

The possibility exists, and one particular family has claimed this heritage for over a century. Genealogical records are sometimes difficult to trace origins, but this is repeated on numerous genealogical sites: "The name Lurvey is a good transliteration of the German, which is a common name among German Jews. There is a tradition in the Lurvey ...


10

The demographic history of France is different from that of most other European countries. While in most European countries mortality rates dropped in mid 19th century but natality rates only declined at the end of that century or even in the beggining of the 20th century, in France natality rates dropped almost simultaneously with mortality rates. Indeed, ...


10

Actually, it was the formal occupation of Manchuria by Japan that began in 1931. But prior to this, the Japanese victory in the Russo-Japanese war led 1) to the Japanese occupation of Korea, 2) the withdrawal of Russia from Manchuria, and 3) the "infiltration" of Japanese into the resulting power vacuum in Manchuria. In 1914, Japan joined the allies in ...


9

To take off on the climate answer, it is noteworthy that the area between Buenos Aires and the Brazilian border (to the north), approximates the southern latitudes of Italy's own northern latitudes. Thus, not only the temperature, but the rainfall and crop patterns of that part of Argentina resemble that of parts of Italy. Basically, Italians felt "at home" ...


9

I wasn't able to find an actual location-of-origin census, which would be definitive. What I did find was two major drivers for German immigration to Texas. The first was Adelsverin, which was an organized attempt to form a "New Germany" in the Republic of Texas, starting in 1842. The founders of the society seem to be from all over Germany. The most famous ...


9

Because the British Nationality Act gave Commonwealth citizens free entry into the United Kingdom in 1948. This coincided with post-war labour shortages. As a result, market demand recruited large numbers of migrant workers into Britain. It is this availability of jobs, not mere disparity in GDP, that attracts immigrants. However, it's inaccurate to ...


8

This touches upon a really fascinating cluster of debates in the history of the late colonial period and the early republic. There are likely many publications on this but it forms one of the central issues in: Aristide R. Zolberg A Nation by Design: Immigration Policy in the Fashioning of America I'll focus on Zolberg's take. The book opens a discussion ...


8

In the end of the XIX century most Jews were concentrated in the Russian empire. (Modern Poland, Ukraine, Belorussia). Until 1917 Jews in the Russian empire were discriminated (Pale of settlement, restrictions on education, discrimination in the army etc.). There were pogroms, people were killed, their property destroyed. With the start of WW I, conditions ...


8

Ostensibly, Labour was against immigration controls. This is evident from its opposition to the Commonwealth Immigrants Act 1968. But your real question appears to be, how likely Labour would have passed the same law. I would argue that there's no great need for speculation. Labour was voted into power during the 1964 election. Despite its earlier ...


8

The chances are minuscule: there were very little Jews in Russia in 17th century. Russia acquired major Jewish population only in the second half of 18th century with incorporation of Poland. So those ancestors could be Jewish, from Europe, but I very doubt they were from Russia. Maybe from Eastern Europe, but hardly from Russia.


7

There are more members of many ethnic backgrounds in the U.S. than in their "home" countries. That is true not only of Jews but of Irish, British, and Germans (less so of southern and eastern Europeans). There are several reasons. 1) America was the "natural" place of emigration for people suffering from religious persecution. That applied to e.g. English ...


7

I think the question comes from misinterpretation of the expression "Romans abandoned". This was not related to any substantial movement of population. This only means that the Roman army (as an organized force) abandoned the defense and law enforcement in certain place. Population remained the same, part of it "Romanized", others not. The army itself ...


7

First, Turkish people are not in general considered of Mongoloid race, neither are Turkic-speaking Azeris. These two peoples are usually classified to belong to Europoid race with maybe only admixture of Mongoloids. Second, there is a lot of Turkic-speaking peoples that are indeed classified Mongoloid: Kazakhs, Kyrgyz, Uzbek, Turkmen. The reason is that ...


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