6

There are two main factors capacity, and time. The destruction of the Dutch East Indies oil fields meant that they produced at only 60% of earlier capacity when Japan managed to restore them. This restoration took place a year later. Capturing the oil fields intact would have meant 100% of capacity available in early 1942 instead of 60% in early 1943. Also, ...


4

That seems pretty much like asking why most countries force their people to drive on the right side of the road, when left driving is clearly superior. Or vice versa. It's pure historical contingency, then path dependency mixed with convention and afterthought rationalisation (like here). It could have been switched at any time to an arbitrary date. Just ...


3

As seen in the Japanese Wikipedia page of the article Order of the Precious Crown, 章の意匠は、古代の女帝の冠(宝冠)の形状... These are crowns worn by Japanese Empresses rather than Emperors. The crown used in the coronation of Empress Go-Sakuramachi shows almost exactly the shape of the crown in the badge.


3

In brief, the desire to capture them intact is because Japan needed the production and refining capacity immediately in order to conduct the war in the manner they wanted. They actually had reasonable success in doing so, and restoring what losses there were, but transport of oil products to Japan became the real bottleneck as the war went on. So, lets look ...


1

Not to hijack the question asked, but merely in an effort to keep the story straight, please accept that Lofton Henderson was not a lieutenant, he was a Major, USMC, commanding VMSB-241 on Midway and led the the Marine dive bomber attack on the Japanese carrier force. He was shot down and killed in this attack. An article in the “Marine Corps Gazette” Mar/...


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