23

The Muslim religion started making its way into modern Indonesia in the 13th century. That's when various rulers in North Sumatra, then Java, started converting to that religion, as a result of contact with Muslim traders, and converted their subjects. The religion got a big boost in the 15th century when the Sultan of Malacca (modern west Malaysia) ...


13

To fill out JK's answer: the VOC directly controlled very little except the shipping routes to Amsterdam (and a few other Dutch ports, but the majority of goods arrived at Amsterdam). Indirectly, through deals and influence at the local courts of the rulers of the islands, they controlled far more. By supplying those rulers with weapons, advisors, European ...


11

Te VOC was not interested in control of people or land, but trade. For example nutmeg; the dutch burned every bit of it except on an island of 1 square km so they could control all of it. IIRC the value would go from 1 in Indonesia to 50000 in Amsterdam. The VOC was the single most profitable company in history (according to my prof.). A journey would take a ...


10

There is a history of anti-Chinese sentiment in Indonesia, but even taking that into consideration, the violence of 1998 was unusually extreme and virulent, attributed to the encouragement of the army and the Suharto regime. Jemma Purdey's Anti-Chinese Violence in Indonesia, 1996–1999 (2006) examines large-scale violence of the kind exemplfieid by the 1998 ...


8

SHORT ANSWER In 1901, there were two higher education institutes but neither was, at the time, truly comparable to Dutch universities. The first genuine university-level education was not available until 1920, the shortage of trained professionals having become apparent during WWI. DETAILED ANSWER Prior to 1800, the education system was in the hands of ...


8

Yes, but this was a lot more complicated than in the Netherlands. During the war, the Dutch colonial government-in-exile in Australia founded the Temporal court-martials, who were tasked with persecuting war criminals and collaborators. The courts started their work as soon as the Dutch regained control over Indonesia and worked until the end of 1949. The ...


7

Perhaps the best way to think of this question is to recognize that there are roughly three ways to think about right/legitimacy, which correspond to the angle of one's approach: the state, domestic stakeholders, and the international community. Each of these are considered below. We should also recognize the difference between a "claim" to legitimacy, and ...


6

You probably confused Papua New Guinea with West New Papua, a region that is indeed under Indonesian administration. Papua New Guinea, on the other hand, was administrated by Australia from 1906 to 1975. It's north part was under control of the German Empire from 1884 to 1914, when it was surrendered to Australia. Papua New Guinea became self governing on ...


6

This Wikipedia article shows the results of the 1930 Dutch East Indies census (in the Social History section), listing 240,417 Europeans out of a total population of over 60.7MM. Calculating this as 0.4% European (with an additional 2.2%, or 1.35MM, Chinese and other foreign orientals), the European population was outnumbered 250-1 and the non-indigenous ...


6

It's an interesting question (although it has been 2 years without satisfying answer; maybe you've found the answer), because it is located between Jawa Timur (East Java) and Nusa Tenggara Barat (West Nusa Tenggara), both of them have about 96% muslim population [1, 2]. Usually people will follow their leader, especially before this modern era. They ...


6

Here is a better version of the graph (click to enlarge). As you can see, the first dip follows, and can be nicely explained by the 1973-4 oil shock as @sempaiscuba commented. The second period you highlighted, however, actually bottomed out only in 1991, four years after the 1987 stock market crash. The Hang-Seng Index for the Hong Kong stock market, where ...


6

Definitely looks like a stabbing weapon. I think Europeans would call/would have called this a long dagger, but in Indonesia I think these were often called swords (short ones, but still). It bears a lot of resemblance to a kris, e.g. the length is about the same, and the handle being slightly curved, even pistol-gripped in some kris, is also a similar ...


5

I will take this question: "Are the ancestors of Malays (of Malaysia) from Yunnan, China?" as: "Was the Neolithic (Early Holocene) expansion of (Pre-) Austronesian-speaking communities into Island Southeast Asia (ISEA) from Yunnan, China?" The only answer, at this point, is: we don't know. We don't know because they are competing models to explain how ...


4

Indeed the reasons are Oil In Liquid (oil) form: but the Iranian incident wasn't a reason for skyrocketing oil prices. For long anyway. But that is just the kicker, as Indonesia was an oil exporting nation! High prices for oil would have benefited the trade balance of that country: Src: Statista: Average annual OPEC crude oil price from 1960 to 2018 ...


4

In the GGS book, the NS orientation is appointed as only one of the reasons that Eurasia was more developed than America and Sub-Saharan Africa. It also considers narrow points and bottlenecks (e.g., panama) which hampers migration and technology spread; the fact that American corn was less efficient in calories-hour than Chinese rice or Eurasian wheat; ...


3

The problem with the Thesis in Gun, Germs, and Steel is that we have one example of an E-W megacontinent (Eurasia) and one example of a N-S one (the Americas). Africa is a bit small, and vague on E-W vs N-S. The Island comparison probably fails due to the small size of any island, so the different terrain zones are similar.


3

The Wikipedia article says: Although some PKI branches organised resistance and reprisal killings, most went passively to their deaths Citing this reference I can not access: McDonald (1980), p. 53; Friend (2003), p. 115. McDonald, Hamish (1980). Suharto's Indonesia. Melbourne: Fontana Books. ISBN 0-00-635721-0. Friend, T. (2003). Indonesian ...


3

The name itself is far older than the country: The name Indonesia derives from the Greek words Indós and nèsos, meaning "Indian island". The name dates to the 18th century, far predating the formation of independent Indonesia. In 1850, George Windsor Earl, an English ethnologist, proposed the terms Indunesians — and, his preference, Malayunesians — for ...


3

There were several reasons, many of which you listed. First, Bali was a relatively isolated part of the country, after Sumatra, Java, and Borneo, far from the main trade routes (near today's Malaysia). That meant that it was less susceptible to Muslim influences. (It's true that Bali is only a few miles from "Java," but that's east Java, the less accessible ...


3

The Indonesians did this in several parts of the country where people were used to "stronger" foreign currencies. For instance, in parts of Borneo that had formerly used British-Malayan currency, the Indonesians issued the Riau rupiah that was pegged to the U.S. dollar, and therefore a stronger currency than the Indonesian rupiah that was not so pegged. The ...


2

This LA Times article by Richard C. Paddock (currently at the New York Times) attests that the practice was revived around the turn of the Millenium. Dayak tribespeople, upset with their treatment by Madurese settlers, revived their century dormant headhunting traditions (my emphasis): Before their killing rampage ebbed, the Dayaks had slaughtered nearly ...


2

In high school in the US, we generally learned that until Europeans started sailing the world, with Vasco Da Gama and Christopher Columbus, there was no long distance sailing. The impression I got was that Europeans were the first to figure out how to explore, and how to trade, and how to sail. This is not correct; many traders vied the seas for centuries ...


1

The Japanese, unlike the Germans, did not use locals to run the country. They replaced the entire system of government with their own, installed (supposedly, in effect chosen based on them not being Dutch) "natives" in junior roles. So there were no local police, clerks, etc. etc. who could be charged with collaborating with the enemy. They also rounded up ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible