19

The biggest issue in deciphering the Indus script is that the average length of the known inscriptions is less than five signs, with the longest one containing only 17 non repeating signs: The longest Indus 'inscription' (if that's the right word) on a single flat surface is M-314, which contains 17 non-repeating symbols. Like all but one Indus '...


10

You are taking the quote out of context. Here is the complete text from the Story of Civilization: Twelve years he wandered, imbibing wisdom from every source, sitting at every shrine, tasting every creed. Some would have it that he went to Judea and was moulded for a while by the tradition of the almost socialistic prophets; and even that he found ...


9

The Indus Valley Civilization (IVC) was a Bronze Age civilization (3300–1300 BCE; mature period 2600–1900 BCE) extending from what today is northeast Afghanistan to Pakistan and northwest India At its peak, the Indus Civilization may have had a population of over five million. Inhabitants of the ancient Indus river valley developed new techniques in ...


8

There's an article here with details and reconstruction pictures like this one. Most of the site is small houses and you can see from photos many have not been reconstructed but there is still a lot that was done. A New York Times article on Mohenjo Daro says Much of the area has been reconstructed with newly made bricks, which preserves the look and ...


5

It would be hard to compare with other contemporary civilisation at the time viz Egyptian or Sumerian as not much written information available of that time. However, archealogical finding suggests many technological advancements 1) Sanitation - use of covered drainage system, (what now called) WC, reservoirs, public bath, dams and step wells to name few (...


5

I just want to know is there any evidence of the practice of burning dead bodies existed in India before 1900 BC It matters very little if there was anecdotal evidence prior to 1900BC. What matters is that, per your own question, the archeological evidence found to date suggests that cremation went from anecdotal or non-existent to widespread after that, ...


5

Sad to say, probably not. Let's look at the reported itenerary of these words: Rice: via Old French ris and Italian riso from Latin oriza, which is from Greek ὄρυζα oryza, through an Indo-Iranian tongue finally from Sanskrit व्रीहिस् vrihi-s "rice", derived from proto-Dravidian. So this word was first imported to Sanskrit (an Indo-Euorpean language ...


5

There is a gap of fifteen centuries between the demise of Indus script, and the origin of Brahmi script. More, Indus Valley script remains undeciphered despite the corpus of literature written in Brahmi script. On the other hand, there are substantial and irreconcilable differences between Kharosthi, which was based on Aramaic, and Brahmi. The most current ...


4

There is no mention in any Greek source of Plato travelling to India, or to any place in Asia. He did however sail to Sicily.


3

As you say, cremation in India is first attested in the archaeological evidence with the Bronze Age Cemetery H culture dating from about 1900 BC. This is considered to be the formative stage of Vedic civilization. Changes in burial practices are often seen as evidence for the arrival of new populations (so-called "invasion hypothesis"). The Rig Veda is one ...


3

I don't know yet, but there is some indirect evidence that an Indian Yogi met Socrates. Travelling far and wide was not uncommon. Shankaracharya travelled all over India on foot. So did Ramanuja. Fa hien and Hiuen Tsang travelled to India, crossing the Himalayas.


3

Yes, stone is typically more expensive than brick for two reasons. The first is that quarries (easily-accessible outcrops of building-quality stone) are rare in most locales, and the second is that the economics of construction favours the rapid laying of small objects (bricks) over the slow laying of more massive objects (quarried stone blocks) for smaller ...


2

In earlier greek texts we find the river Ganges being described as Phison. So it is natural that they knew about this river. If they knew about this river then it is sure that the river was then also famous for some reasons. May be because of mystic and Sanatana Dharma religion " Hinduism". So if Alexander can travel to India in B.C 326 . Plato may have too ...


1

This is probably not a very good answer, although perhaps it provides some context. There is evidence that the Indus valley people migrated towards Sumer, and conducted trade with Oman and the present day orient, by boat, from 3000BC until later civilizations used the same trade route in 350BC. The details of Indus valley chronology and trade are ...


1

The Indus Valley civilization started declining around 1700 BCE. The Bronze Age transitioned into the Iron age also referred to as PGW(Painted Greyware)-Iron age, somewhere around 1000-1100 BCE (Iron was discovered in burial sites near Gandhara). There was no abrupt collapse of the bronze age. . The conventional viewpoint is that at this stage that mixing ...


1

I agree wih @SiddhantKumar's answer here. I want to add some points he has overlooked. The Indus valley civilization was one of the most advanced civilizations during the bronze age. 1) Sanitation - There were underground sewage systems, flush toilets and a proper sewage drainage system which collects sewage fro individual houses. They were all first of ...


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