23

Because for society as a whole, a peaceful transition of power is infinitely more important than honoring whatever rights a bastard might claim. The most dangerous time for any kingdom (or nation, really) is the interregnum between the passing of the old leader and the assumption of power by the next. Kingdoms which had a well-ordered process surely tended ...


14

Most "bastards" were sired by their fathers with women of a lower rank than the fathers. Kings and princes would seldom have access to "princesses" (who were protected and treated like vestal virgins until they married) outside of wedlock, but they would have numerous relations with other women, ranging from servants to lesser nobility, who were "too low" to ...


11

It would appear no money was paid out to the communist party, but it wasn't directly paid the the individuals heirs either. Any funds associated with the Peoples Temple cult were located in a lengthy search, then court proceedings established payment rates to cover the massive amount of claims made against this group. An extensive discussion of the process ...


7

Normally, there was no sense in adopting girls. There are only two known examples, and both took place under very specific circumstances. Livia Drusilla was formally adopted by Augustus' testament, so she got the name of Augusta in AD 14. On the first day of the Senate he allowed nothing to be discussed but the funeral of Augustus, whose will, which was ...


7

Well, in England the general rule has been, once a bastard always a bastard, with no inheritance rights - and as far as peerages are concerned, this still applies: a child born out of wedlock cannot inherit a title, even if the parents subsequently marry. Kings of course, have broken their own laws when it suited them. The children of John of Gaunt and ...


6

Different societies around the world had different succession practices, customs, rules, or laws. Ancient Roman laws restricted inheritance to the legitimate sons and daughters of a man. Since the marriage of Gaius Julius Caesar with Queen Cleopatra VII Philopater of Egypt was with a foreigner and not recognized by Roman law, their son Ptolemy XV ...


6

They could! In certain countries, at least. Norway and Denmark's early medieval rulers were bastards more often than not; Denmark had six bastard sons becoming kings in a row, and Norway possibly eight. One of the more well-known English kings, William the Conqueror, is also known as William the Bastard, and started out from his inherited Normandy. Whether ...


5

The Papacy is as good as it gets as an example - altough there were families with considerable influence over the choice of Cardinals and later on the Pope, and Nepotism was rampant, there were effective checks on Papal power - if one family tried to get a firm grip on the Pope/Papal position, at least one unhappy nation would start a war, not to mention the ...


3

Andrew Carnegie had one daughter (Margaret Carnegie Miller) and no sons. She inherited his money and was trustee for his charitable foundation, but Andrew Carnegie gave the bulk of his fortune to charity (about $350 million out of $480 million, which was a lot in 1900!).


3

If you look at the list of the Great Khans you will see it begins like this: Genghis Khan (1206–1227) Tolui Khan (as Regent) (1227–1229) Ögedei Khan (1229–1241) Töregene Khatun (as Regent) (1243–1246) Güyük Khan (1246–1248) Oghul Qaimish (as Regent) (1248–1251) Möngke Khan (1251–1259) There's a regent every other time so at first glance you might think ...


2

In the Mongol Empire, males could be conscripted into the army at age 15. It therefore follows that men could be qualified for other important duties, such as being Khan, at that age. As far as I know, there were no Mongol laws against children succeeding at a younger age without having full powers, but they tended not to survive under the severe Mongol ...


2

The Novgorod Republic comes to mind. I cannot think of any family supplying more than one top ruler (be it a Prince, a posadnik or an archbishop). I cannot say if Novgorodian system was specifically set up to prevent the formation of powerful dynastic blocks, but it surely succeeded in doing so.


1

It was often alleged that a disliked monarch was not who he claimed to be, that his alleged parents, despairing of having real children, pretended to have a child that was really unrelated. Thus the births of royal children were often very public with many high ranking witnesses, and yet despite that a monarch's enemies would continue to claim that he was a ...


1

Sweden in 1810 - 1818. The monarch legally adopted a French general as the official heir. It took generations for the resulting rift between dynastic factions to be healed by a royal marriage. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/House_of_Bernadotte


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