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42

The website apparently originating this image has a fuller/bigger version of it: From that we can conclude a few things: The helmet wearing people are 'old warriors'. Since they are not even showing a face it stands to reason that the prophet himself and Ali are either meant or alluded to (a really strict observance of rules would even forbid that what ...


18

SHORT ANSWER The reason why the Soviet Union backed down over Iran is still the subject of debate, but there does not appear to be any evidence that he threatened a nuclear strike. Nor would Stalin have needed reminding of American nuclear capability. There was, though, considerable diplomatic pressure from the US both inside and outside the UN. It is also ...


14

The Invasion of Iran was carried out by British and Commonwealth forces in the south, and Soviet forces in the north. The Shah of Iran was forced to abdicate, and the new Iranian government under his son was obliged to adopt a pro-Allied stance. For the remainder of the war, Iran was occupied by Soviets in the north and British forces in the south. The ...


14

Persia / Iran was sovereign for most of its history. Actually, Persia / Iran had colonies, mostly in the Caucasus region, before they were lost to Russia in the early 1800's. At times Russia and / or Britain held some Iranian territory occupied, but Iran was not "defeated" wholesale prior to the Anglo-Soviet invasion in 1941... by which time "colonization" ...


14

Turkey and Azerbaijan are historically the same nation. The slogan is "one nation two states". So Sunni/Shia difference is not very important. Both countries also have important economic ties such as gas and oil pipelines. In addition, both countries had conflicts with Armenia. So alliance is natural Iran has a major Azeri population. Historically ...


13

Comparing just to the Constitution of the Netherlands, that of Belgium was for a Unitary State with no substantial body of Common Law and tradition, while that of The Netherlands was for a Federal State, with a substantial body of Common Law and Tradition. Further part of the motive for the separation of Belgium from Netherlands in 1831 had been a feeling ...


13

There were plenty of European revolutions which led to terrible casualties and not much democracy, both before and after the French revolution. The Hussite wars. The English revolution of 1688. The German revolutions of 1848/49. The Paris commune of 1870. The revolutionaries simply tried again, or they faded away when conditions changed.


12

I won't try to speak for the rest (another answer seems to be putting a lot of work into that), but it appears the green cloaked figures are meant to be representations of Imam Husayn and his family, who are early holy figures in the Shi'a Islam sect prevalent in Iran, also known as the People of the Cloak. Quoting MENA* consultant @Weddady from Twitter: ...


12

Your reading of how alliances work is a bit too on the nose. Religious and political links are a major factor. But they definitely aren't the only one. The word 'technically' is misapplied here. Another factor is common adversaries. Azerbaijan has a long running conflict with Armenia, as you know. Turkey has also had major conflicts with Armenia. This is a ...


10

According to Ronen Bergman, in his book The Secret War With Iran, there were four factors motivating Israel's Operation Seashell, in which hundreds of tons of Israeli weapons were airlifted or shipped to Iran during the Iran–Iraq war: Israel had sustained significant losses due to the 1979 revolution in Iran. Since weapons were the Iranian rulers means of ...


10

Iran and Saudi Arabia are both majority Muslim nations in western Asia, with a lot of their external revenue coming from oil extraction. But that's about where the resemblance ends. Iran is largely Shia' in religion, and the vast majority of its population speak Indo-European (Mostly Indo-Iranian) languages. Only about 3% of its population is Arab. Their ...


9

The two situations were completely different: in 1943 Iran was largely occupied by the Allies (British and Russian) who thus had the final say in everything. Whereas in 1979 the Shah was toppled by a genuine revolution; at that stage there was nothing the US could have done for him. Perhaps if he had abdicated himself a few years before 1979 in favour of, ...


7

The Iranian Revolution was in 1979. Before this time, the US and Iran were close friends when the nation was run by the Shah. The Vietnam War ended in 1975. I assume that Iran supported the US in Vietnam, because the governments were still very close. The modern Iranian government did not like Sadaam Hussien. The Iran-Iraq War of 1980-1988 was likely fresh ...


7

It is not true. The name Iran is old enough and comes from Ayran which means the land of Aryans but Reza Shah suspected westerners' motives in using the name Persia instead of Iran and tried to change the name to Iran again. Reza Shah had extreme nationalist ideas, and the Nazi regime cheated him and abused these feelings in the second world war. Westerners ...


6

Flu is caused by a virus. A virus is too small for an optical microscope. The 1918 flu pandemic was neither caused nor spread by humans intentionally (although some nations uses quarantine to good effect). Humans still have no effective flu treatment. Blaming the British for Iranian deaths from the pandemic is preposterous. The British did not quarantine ...


5

As you mentioned, their linguistic relation to Kurdish does imply a shared history at some time in the past. As near as I can piece together from various sources online, the split may have happened as early as 200AD though, which in terms of languages (and history) is quite a long time indeed. They have an oral tradition of descent from Hamza, an uncle of ...


5

I will answer the part of your question about these four specific names. The Persian names for Holland and Germany are recent borrowings from French. Lehestān is borrowed from Turkish and derives from the name of the Lendians, a Slavic tribe who once lived in what is now Poland. Hend is an Arabicised form of Middle Persian hindūg, Old Persian hindū-, ...


5

Here are a few pages that have more detail. The official report is worth a look. The first one lists several mistakes, including: The lack of any overall review of the plan The requirement that all the US armed services should have a "piece of the action", which led to helicopters not being flown by crews who were familiar with them, who might well have ...


5

Not really, no. In the 10th century CE, the Mesoamerican polity of note was the Toltecs. They were viewed by the later Aztecs sort of in the same way Medieval Europeans viewed the Romans or Greeks, but there's a lot of debate about how much they actually lived up to their later Aztec "press". There is no archeological evidence that they ever had the ...


4

There are many Geo political reasons for that. Most of the other names are kept by other countries. India is called India (from Indus) because British kept it. Its called Hindustan (Land of Hindus) because Arabs kept it. Germans call their country Deutschland but internationally it is called as Germany. It is the same as we have synonyms in any language for ...


4

I am going to answer these questions as best I can. It is actually too broad of a question to fully answer in an amount of time I have to spare for it. Since it is a symbol that spans multiple ages of humanity. Though since the original poster was seeking a starting point for further information, I am of the belief that this will provide that starting ...


4

Historically, every country had many different names - what they called themselves, and what others called them. Conquerors came and said "This is now SomethingLand" while the people who lived there were already calling it "OurIsland" in their language or "LandOfTrees" in their language or whatever. [There is a claim that "Canada" comes from an Iroquoian ...


4

To a large extent both Alexander and his father were inspired by the Ten THousand, as well as the Greeks' dramatic victories against the invasions by Darius and Xerxes. In these campaigns the Greek heavy hoplite infantry had proved itself more than a match for the best that the Persians could muster. Once united under the Macedonian mantle, a force of ...


4

I haven't found a lot of numbers specifically for British Persia, but it is amost certianly the case that far more subjects of that area died from the Spanish Flu (50-100 million killed world-wide) rather than WWI (about 16 million killed, mostly in Europe and Africa). Even among the heaviest combatants, the the numbers were close (eg: UK 1 mil for war, 250K ...


4

The 1964 speech was arguably a turning point in Khomeini's campaign against the Shah. The speech was against the Shah's giving U.S. servicemen "extraterritorial" privileges, the right to be tried for crimes in Iran in American, rather than Irani courts. It cut pretty close to home and upset the Shah. The Shah didn't try to kill him, but did arrest and ...


4

Wilayat al Faqih is traditionally not a position, but a principle, or theory. The principle says that an Islamic Jurist as a guardian of people. There has been several different views on what this means, and if the Islamic Jurist is a guardian in all things, including secular, or only a guardian in religious matters. Ruhollah Khomeini expanded on this ...


4

The answer to your question is that both the CIA and Canadians were responsible for the escape of the American diplomats. The Canadian Broadcasting Corporation, Central Intelligence Agency, Al Jazeera, Ottawa Citizen, New York Times, Montreal Gazette, and many other sources confirm the story. Once the crisis started the CIA contacted the Canadians in Tehran,...


4

The U.S. and Iran were originally allies when the shah they supported was in power. the Iran hostage crisis and subsequent revolution changed this by removing the shah from power and installing the Ayatollah as the new leader of Iran who was fiercely anti American. Iraq was supported by the Soviets, however the Iran-Iraq War was taking place during the ...


4

As per T.E.D's suggestion, to summarize the detailed answer I have posted already, following are main points: Safavids main target was the Sunni Muslim community of Iran which was the majority of Iranian population at inception of Safavid Empire. They considered them possible fifth column since main rivals of Safavids were Sunni Ottomans who were expanding ...


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