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34

Traditionally, there had been no conscription in Ireland, at least not after the 17th century. Irish did serve in the British army, but only as volunteers. As an occupying country, Britain did not want to 1) antagonize and 2) train Irish soldiers who would be not loyal to them. Irish volunteers, on the other hand, served with pride so they were self-selected ...


31

Legally they were exempt because The Military Service Act (1916) applied to men "ordinarily resident in Great Britain" not men "ordinarily resident in the United Kingdom" But practically, it would have taken more men to supress the inevitable uprising than they would have recruited. John Dillon MP said: If you had passed a Military Service Bill for ...


30

At the risk of being pedantic, it is worth noting that some parts of the three counties traditionally included in the province of Ulster were transferred to the newly created Northern Ireland. However, the overall thrust of your question is correct - the traditional province of Ulster was divided by the Partition of Ireland. The shape of modern Northern ...


28

To answer this question, you first have to answer another complex question: Who are the English? This question turns out to be quite complex indeed because to this day scholars are unsure whether to subscribe to an invasionist/migrationist view or a diffusionist view in regards to the Britons, the Celtic people of Great Britain (excluding Scotland) which ...


23

England lies in the warmest, richest, and most fertile parts of the British Isles. These are modern population figures, but they are indicative of past relative strengths: England, 55 million; Ireland (counting northern Ireland), 6 million; Scotland, 5 million, Wales, 3 million. Frankly, I was surprised at the disparity between England, and all others (14 ...


21

There is no credible evidence that the apostle James ever visited Ireland. According to Acts 12:1-22, James was beheaded in Jerusalem by Herod Agrippa, with no indication that he had traveled. Acts does include passages about other apostles' travels--most notably Paul, but also Philip in Samaria and Peter in Caesarea. The fourth century church historian ...


20

Revolutions and uprisings tend to occur when youth population booms coincide with political or economic oppression. Ireland had a post-WWII baby boom like many Western countries and the 1970's was when enough of those people were in their twenties and unhappy with the situation they were born into. There is something unique about being between 15 and 30: ...


19

As far as I'm aware, this was something particular to the early Celtic church in Ireland. Before I attempt to explain further I'd like to add an important caveat in regard to terminology: These days, the term "Celtic Church" has, rightly, fallen out of favour with many (perhaps most) historians. The reason is that the term implies that there was a unified ...


18

The obvious reason for Scotland being "conquered" by England is that King James VI of Scotland was heir to the English throne, and upon the death of Elizabeth I of England (and Ireland) found himself ruling both kingdoms. The larger English population and stronger economy then led to the English language gradually pushing aside both Scottish Gaelic and ...


16

Ireland was not a threat to Rome By the time the Romans had reached Britain, their empire covered most of western Europe and their resources were becoming stretched. For most of the time they spent in Britain, they were more concerned with holding on to what they had rather than expanding further. Caesar invaded Britain in BCs 55 & 54 to see what was ...


13

Scotland joining England and Wales: The Darien Disaster was an ill-fated attempt to build a roadway across Central America by the Scots. It was backed by most of the Scottish nobility, and its failure nearly bankrupted them. This in turn, nearly bankrupted the Scottish Treasury. This lead to the Union of the Parliaments between Scotland and England in 1707. ...


12

The situation in early medieval Ireland was rather unique, as I explained in an answer to another question. The situation there was largely a legacy of the fact that the early monasteries had been founded under Irish Brehon Law. The point made by M & H. Whittock about the attacks in Ireland seems reasonable, although the comment about Aldhelm, abbot of ...


10

To invade Ireland, the Romans would first have needed to gain full control of either Wales or the Clyde estuary in Scotland, something they never succeeded in doing. The Romans very much wanted to conquer Ireland, because the Irish were a constant source of weapons and "rebellibus" support to the Scots and Welsh for attacks on Roman communities. During the ...


10

Furniture has of course been in use for thousands of years before the advent of Christianity. The earliest excavation of furniture artifacts in Britain were found in Skara Brae, Scotland. It is estimated to be from 3100-2500 BC. Due to lack of wood, the inhabitants are thought to have compensated by use of stone as the artifacts included: Stone beds Stone ...


10

Until 1603, Irish couples could divorce for several reasons (sterility/infertility, impotency, homosexuality, abortion, infanticide, flagrant infidelity, insanity, abandonment...). Marriage was a private contract and up to the council of Trent (1563) clandestine marriages that could be dissolved easily were common. For instance, Irish couples were not ...


7

There are quite a few great sources on this topic. If by “how common”, you are implying that you are looking for hard, measurable and very-much-incomplete sample data (that you have to, of course, collate yourself), this is going to come from digitized historical court records like the Assize Courts that @Kobunite linked to, or from the proceedings of the ...


7

What I'm seeing there for good attestations are the following: In Irish folklore, a Jack-o'-lantern appears to have been the same as what was called a will-o'-the-wisp in English folklore. In other words, ignited swamp gas visible at night, with lots of creative folklore built up around it. This is attested to as known folklore before we know of the term ...


7

Scotland, Ireland and Wales along with England were all integral parts of the UK with full representation in the UK government. The four nations each benefited from the Union, for the most part anyway. And so with the exception of Ireland, there has never been a majority in any of the four in favour of independence. (that may change soon though.) Canada, ...


7

Late to this discussion, but relevant, is that the Gaels of Ireland claim to have migrated from Galicia in Spain. In the most popular legend, the son of the King of Galicia climbed a tall tower and spied a green land beyond: Ireland. (Ridiculous, because no mountain is high enough.) He sailed over, liked it, and more settlers followed. In the real world, ...


7

The other answer notes that this remains a controversial subject, and has already presented most of the evidence used by nationalist historians to make the case that the "Irish Potato Famine", or "Great Famine", was an instance of genocide. However, it is equally important to examine the evidence that those historians tend to ignore. I will try to present ...


6

SHORT ANSWER The available sources suggest that even Iron Age roundhouses had some basic furniture such as benches and that, among the poor at least, the quantity (and probably the quality) of furniture did not change much for many centuries, perhaps until as late as the 16th century. DETAILED ANSWER Although our knowledge of furniture in the homes of ...


6

St Patrick is recognized as a saint of various Christian denominations, including the Catholic and Orthodox Churches. It is generally accepted that he died on March 17 493, but that actual date and year is open to debate. Even the year of his birth is not known with any surety. Patrick was born in a village that he identified as Bannavem Taberniae, ...


5

Since England had not been invaded by the Romans at this time, and Ireland was beyond that, the odds are extremely unlikely that any such event took place. There are always legends created in far-flung areas of having Biblical 'celebrities' visit, but travel was not easy in those days. Most evidence says that the James apostles were martyred in the Holy ...


5

The use of the word 'Celts', or the non Roman spelling, 'Kelts' (Romans had no K in their alphabet and so used C) is very confusing. The Britons were not Kelts, the Romans record that the Britons or Pretani called themselves the Britanni in the south and Brittoni in the north. On Pliny's map Britain is named, and much of Europe including Gaul, is named '...


5

You might like one of my local fortifications (The Portsmouth area is a fortification rich area with forts/castles dating from the 3rd to the 19th and probably 20th Century, all worth a look), Porchester castle is built on the remains of a Roman Fort of the Saxon Shore, with large parts of the Roman fortifications (including D shaped bastions) incorporated ...


5

I found this for you: There have been three symbols of sciences in use by the nation of the Cymry from the beginning. The symbol of word and speech, that is to say, a letter, ten fold, sixteen fold, twenty fold, and twenty-four fold. The first of the three, in respect of privilege and origin, is the symbol of word and speech, that is to say, a letter. The ...


5

IRA bombings did increase Hibernophobia in Great Britain, as one would expect. John O'Beirne Ranelagh's "A Short History of Ireland" (Third Edition, Cambridge University Press, 2012. Page 217) makes mention of increased Hibernophobia being a result of IRA bombings during the lead-up to World War II: The effect of the IRA bombings was in Britain to ...


5

Citing the work is really critical. Knowing the title permits me to access the Wikipedia page which gives me the legal statue under which the marriage occurred. According to Irish “Brehon Laws,” a marriage becomes permanent only after three years. Until then, either party may dismiss the other. Grace invokes this law and banishes Donal from her life (“I ...


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