10

Peter C. Scales:The Fall of the Caliphate of Cordoba: Berbers and Andalusis in Conflict (Medieval Iberian Peninsula, Vol 9), the source linked in the answer by @Mr.lock / @Kobunite actually hints at a plausible answer to OP's question, namely that Abd al-Rahman was recognized when he arrived in al-Andalus because members of the Umayyad family had already ...


7

I think you can talk about potential Moorish influences on Iberian nautical expansion in following three areas: Wealth By the 9th/10th Century, al-Andalus (Islamic Spain + Portugal) was by far the most advanced and wealthiest part of Western or Central Europe. When the northern Christian kingdoms expanded south, they were generally conquering places that ...


6

According to Colin McEvedy, in 737 AD, after the Muslim conquest of Visigothic Hispania, the population on the Peninsula was around 4 million. Nearly all of that would have been in Muslim-held territory, as there simply wasn't much else but a couple of little strips of land in the mountainous northern coastal region. Toledo was the only city of any real size ...


6

From additional research I have clarified this answer to better reflect the documentation from Spanish Historians who have provided much more detailed commentary and record of the events of the Grenadian War. Your initial question asks if the Grenadian people believed that the Spanish would be faithful to the terms of the surrender. The Spanish Wikipedia ...


5

I don't have much relevant expertise, but am inclined to question the uniqueness of Al-Andalus on both points. First, the case can be made that Islam in general was more tolerant of Jews then Christian rulers were. The Wikipedia article on the Muslim concept of dhimmi or "protected peoples" quotes a scholar who asserts: The legal and security situation ...


5

"Some people believe that Renaissance started in Toledo". Who are these people? I think the prevailing opinion is that Renaissance started in Italy. By the way, Columbus came from Italy too. And notice that his first voyage started in exactly the same year when the last Moorish kingdom fell, and Jews were expelled from Iberian peninsula. (As it is ...


3

TL; DR: Yes, there is a relationship, but not of the kind you probably think. A lot has been written on how Columbus' journey of discovery was only made possible by the fact that he was hilariously wrong about his estimates of the size of the Earth. The man himself being Genovese, his estimate would have been based largely on Italian science which yes, was ...


3

The Spanish Muslims had "some" reason to expect that the Spanish would observe their rights. The "Reconquista" had been going on for several centuries, and the Spanish had (earlier) more or less observed treaty terms in the newly reconquered territories. This "observance" had become less as time went by. Three things made the fifteenth century version "...


3

The Wikipedia article on Al Andalus mentions this: Arabs, and Berbers comprised eighty percent of the population of Al-Andalus by around 1100. BTW as well as this: Jews constituted more than five percent of the population. If you are looking for a source published in book form, I would recommend Ibn Khaldun: The Mediterranean in the 14th century: ...


2

It had more to do with the Reconquista. There was a social pattern that Aragon, Castile, and Portugal developed as they "reconquered" the Iberian Peninsula. This same pattern was how they colonized the new world very rapidly and very cheaply. In Reconquista a captain would gather fighting men with the promise of shares of any wealth or land they would ...


1

Abd al-Rahman I's mother was a Moor from a tribe called Nafra (click the link for pg 111). That helped him to be recognized first in Morocco and then in Islamic Spain as well.


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