32

There is some truth in it, but the printing press adoption delay was only a late symptom of an attitude that began much earlier. In short is was more of contempt for the culture and aesthetics of print and the demand for censorship than an outright real, complete ban. The first book in Arabic was published in an Italian town named Fano in 1514. During ...


13

States in West Africa, including Senegal, Gambia, Guinea, Burkina Faso, Niger, Mali and Nigeria The conversion to Islam in this region happened in a gradual process. Margari Hill's The Spread of Islam in West Africa: Containment, Mixing, and Reform from the Eighth to the Twentieth Century described the process in three stages, which doesn't include ...


12

Many of the descendants of the Mongol empire (except China, Mongolia and Far East). It is true that they were conquered by the Mongols, but at that time Mongols were not Muslims. At a later period some descendants of Mongols converted to Islam, in fact they accepted the religion of one of the conquered nations, and the result is that their contemporary ...


11

It appears that both are correct. It's just that they are referring to different buildings. The term Moti Masjid simply means "Pearl Mosque". The Moti Masjid (Agra Fort) "Pearl Mosque" in Agra was built by the Mughal emperor Shah Jahan in the 17th century. Image source - Wikimedia The Moti Masjid (Lahore Fort) "Pearl Mosque" inside the Lahore Fort was ...


10

Iran and Saudi Arabia are both majority Muslim nations in western Asia, with a lot of their external revenue coming from oil extraction. But that's about where the resemblance ends. Iran is largely Shia' in religion, and the vast majority of its population speak Indo-European (Mostly Indo-Iranian) languages. Only about 3% of its population is Arab. Their ...


6

First, there’s a Wikipedia article on Dan Gibson, and it says he is not a professional historian, and is criticized by them. The article also contains links to critical reviews you may want to read. For example, here’s a criticism from David King and Gibson’s response. However, it’s a traditional knowledge in Islam that before Mecca, Jerusalem was Qibla. ...


5

Interestingly, the book The eclipse of the 'Abbasid caliphate; original chronicles of the fourth Islamic century, contains a slightly different account, suggesting that a huge ransom of fifty thousand dinars was offered, but never actually paid: In this year the Qarmatians restored the Black Stone to its place in the Sacred House of Meccah. It had been ...


5

Islam at first mostly spread by the sword. It could rapidly spread because of convenient circumstances. The everlasting border wars between the Byzantine and Sassanid empires hurt both empires seriously. They were not able to resist first Muslim border raids and later outright conquest. If those two empires hadn't bled themselves white against each other, ...


4

A quick search brings up the book The Mughal World: Life in India's Last Golden Age By Abraham Eraly, pg 284, which seems to have some figures for this particular time and reign: Another source, History Of Aurangzib Vol. 3, by Sarkar, Jadunath, shows the same information:


4

Other than Suleyman's notorious short temper and tendency to keep grudges against people who caused offence whether real or imaginary, With further reading, it looks like that It wasn't Suleyman that the Generals personally disliked, rather his alliances. For context, Umayyads themselves were Adnanite Arabs (Qaysids) but Princes and Caliphs often allied ...


4

The Ghana Empire became Muslim in the 1100's. The subsequent fall of the Ghana Empire and the rise of Islam coincided perfectly. Arab tradition states that the Muslim Almoravids conquered Ghana. While this probably isn't true, there was likely an element of political control involved in maintaining the gold trade. They did invade several times as far as Mali....


3

Sufism is responsible for the proselytism and spread of Islam, first in the Middle East, then as far as Africa and South Asia. Sufism was a mystical form of Islam. The Sufi doctrine was established by certain mystics, and propagated widely by missionaries. It focused on one's personal experience with god and a divine love. Its message had popular appeal. ...


3

The Byzantines did know about Caltrops. A Companion to Byzantine Illustrated Manuscripts, Page 111 The so-called "Heron of Byzantium" is a name used to refer to an anonymous Byzantine compiler and commentator of two treatises: the De strategematibus, an instructional manual on the fabrication of siege machines and Geodesia, a manual on the use of a ...


3

Legally all the Muslims were treated identically, at least on paper, as only non-Muslims had jizya imposed on them. However the different Islamic groups in medieval Iberia came from different ethno-cultural backgrounds, and the three principal groups Arabs, Berbers, and Muladi (native iberian muslims) formed three distinct communities that contributed to ...


2

Most certainly. The most famous example was probably Mansa Musa of Mali. He was enormously wealthy from his empire's gold production, and made a lavish Hajj in 1324 accompanied by thousands of courtiers (he distributed gold so freely that in Cairo its value dropped by a quarter against silver). Musa was impressed by the many scholars and men of letters he ...


2

Yazid went by the standards of the day, but went about them in a somewhat twisted way. Women and children were off-limits for killing, but anyone who took up arms against him was killed. Husayn was holding his six-month-old son in a gesture of peacemaking, but both were killed when he approached Yazid's army. Likewise, while they spared Ali ibn Husayn Zayn ...


1

It might be a bit too simplified to attribute the Iranian revolution to just one man and his ideas. He's now dead, by the way. Many forces contributed to how the Islamic revolution unfolded and how policies, also towards women changed compared to the Shah era. It is simply untrue that the sixties and seventies were a haven for unopressed men and women and ...


1

I focus on: How did Islam end up with a single Qur'an, without variant readings? In the early years of Islam two key factors ensured the production of a single version, without variants, of a book, the Qur’an, for the whole of Islam. The first factor was the existence of a single, centralised, controlling authority of the whole of the Muslim world with ...


1

First, while Hajj is one of the Five Pillars and is recommended to do it once a year, the actual requirement is once in the lifetime only. If you take into account the spread of Muslim rule in Xth and XIth centuries, only certain percentage of the Muslims would actually go on a Hajj regularly, let alone yearly. There are indeed conditions to be met before ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible