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46

There is no evidence they seriously considered expelling all Palestinians. The impracticality, illegality and negative publicity was self-evident, even if fringe elements entertained the fantasy. However, there's evidence that smaller scale displacements were carried out. It resulted in the 1967 exodus. During the brief war of 1967, 350,000 Palestinians ...


29

Decided to do some research to try to provide an answer to this question. I found three documented cases where an Arab leader used the term "Drive Jews into the sea" or talked about large scale massacre. I also mention a court case that seems to indicate that Nasser never used that term himself, nor did any other Arab leader make genocidal statements prior ...


26

It is clear that Stalin supported the creation of Israel. From the Wiki: For Soviet foreign policy decision-makers, pragmatism took precedence over ideology. Without changing its official anti-Zionist stance, from late 1944, until 1948 and even later, Joseph Stalin adopted a pro-Zionist foreign policy, apparently believing that the new country would be ...


26

There's been a lot of debate about the Exodus over the last several decades. Its obviously a touchy subject for religious reasons, but the balance of the current scholarly opinion currently appears to be that there's no good evidence that such an event actually occurred. The Book of Exodus appears to have been written and molded over a 200 year period ...


25

The Jews were largely exiled from 'Judea' which Romans then renamed 'Palestina' in 132CE by the Romans, after a rebellion against Roman rule. They dispersed into the Roman Empire, and gradually spread to all parts of the world. 1800 years later, there were quite a lot of them in Germany, but it's very unlikely that many, if any, had moved as individuals all ...


23

The Arab-Israeli conflict didn't start in 1948, it has a long history and was particularly intensified after the British government promised Palestine both to its Arab and Jewish population in the course of World War I. The first armed conflict is apparently assumed to be the Battle of Tel Hai in 1920. As a result, while Israel didn't exist before 1948 ...


23

What Arab plans can be inferred from three classes of sources: (1) Pre-war statements to the Arab population with promises that all would share in the booty of Jewish property won by the Arab Legion armies, (2) changes in Ottoman land ownership laws following Jordan's annexation of the West Bank and East Jerusalem Here are some statements from Arab books and ...


22

I'm not aware of any evidence that Israel considered mass expulsions from occupied territories in the aftermath of the 1967 Six Day War. As I understand it, the civilian populations would have been protected under the terms of the Fourth Geneva Convention. In particular, Article 49 of the Convention states that: "Individual or mass forcible transfers, as ...


20

In short, the answer is "no" to long term political effects. The article you refer to starts with a very good summation (and is my source throughout): The contrast between the very speedy resolution of the crisis in Israeli-Argentine relations and the affair's long-lasting effects on Argentina's Jews indicates once again that the interests of the ...


18

This is an excellent question and this answer is only the "easy" answer based on easily available sources, and should be used primarily as a jumping off point for more research on what is in fact more likely a more complicated reality. The full PDFs of the stenographic protocols of the Zionist congresses from 1897-1935 are available here: http://edocs.ub....


18

In 1974 the PLO adopted what is called "The Ten Point Program". It is a program that outlines a phased plan for liberating all of Palestine. Liberating here means liberating it from Israeli rule. Obviously once all of Palestine has been liberated that means there is no Israel at all. If we take this at face value, that means that any compromise you make ...


16

It is of course impossible for the Israelites to have no ancestors. It is also impossible to know their ancestors with absolute certainty. I give you here several quotations from "A History of the Jewish People", chapter 3 "The Dawn of Israel" by Abraham Malamat, edited by H.H. Ben-Sasson, from Harvard University Press to provide a modern historical answer....


16

I'll summarize what the Jewish Study Bible, 2nd edition says about the subject. This material is from the introduction to Exodus and two essays: "The Religion of the Bible" and "Archeology and the Hebrew Bible". Positive evidence: We know that Semites of similar ethnicity to the Hebrews had for centuries migrated to Egypt in search of food and water during ...


16

China did not participate in the voting as it has a long-standing policy of not participating in votes on resolutions of which it does not approve. The reasons for not participating or abstaining: the Chinese have been reluctant to use their veto power, opting instead for abstention and non-participation in votes. In this way — typical of Beijing’s ...


15

Josephus was able to read and write in several languages. Obviously Greek as he wrote most of his books in it. Aramaic, which was often called Syriac in his time. Latin maybe. Even though he was associated with Vespasian, that would not necessitate knowing Latin. The Romans spoke Greek as it was the lingua franca of the day. Once Josephus was given a Latin ...


14

As a matter of fact, the 1948 war actually started on November 30th, 1947 - the day after the UN Partition Resolution, as the Arabs vowed not to accept it. The first phase of the war pitted Palestine Arab irregular warbands against Jewish paramilitary formations - the mainstream Haganah, the more nationalist Irgun, and the really really radical Lehi. The ...


14

Summary Nothing is known beyond the official drive the Jews into the Sea rhetoric, and nothing definitive will probably be known. Nothing is Known Most countries do not publish their unfulfilled plans, and, even when they do, there is no good way to ascertain their authenticity. This is especially true for the Arab states in question, which were at the ...


13

The answer to how Israel won the Six Day War has filled numerous books and cannot be done justice in a short-form resource like this. At best, one can only give a summary in this space, but even the summaries that came before mine have given short-shrift to some key factors. Obviously, air superiority ranks first. The Israeli Air Force's success at ...


13

The policies of Soviet Union were never determined by "hate" or other emotions. They were always pragmatic. (For example, they "hated" Nazism when they found it useful, and then suddenly made a U-turn and started to support Nazi Germany, when they saw potential benefits of this. And did this until they were attacked themselves). Israel was founded by ...


13

As Evergalo says, Jewish leaders were not at all interested in this idea. Even if they had been (which makes no sense), such a hypothetical state would have been treated as an enemy by the Germans. There was a common belief in Germany during the latter part of WWII that the Allied bombing was purely revenge for German treatment of the Jews (Source: Germany ...


12

UCSD held a fascinating conference on the topic of the Exodus a couple of years back, which I highly recommend viewing - It contains a variety of views on the subject, along with both archeological and textual attempts to support the various hypotheses. That the Exodus story as described in the Old Testament is a myth, is a pretty much universally agreed ...


12

When considering historicity, Abraham, Jacob, and Isaac have traditionally been considered together as the "patriarchs". There used to be some historians who seriously argued that they lived during a patriarchal age sometime around 2000BC. Today the stories they are contained in can fairly reliably be placed as written in the near east Iron Age, which is ...


12

It seems that at least some Western leaders have thought about it, but no such proposal came to the fore because Zionist and Jewish leaders were not interested at all. According to Jonathan Frankel: In London in the summer of 1941 to meet with Lord Moyne, the newly appointed secretary of state for the colonies, Ben-Gurion made the question of the ...


12

Copies of the letter to the New York Times, dated 2 December 1948 are easy enough to find online. It is worth noting that Einstein was not the only signatory to the letter, although his is naturally the name that commentators choose to quote. The paragraph quoted by Lustig itself contains part of the answer to your question: Among the most disturbing ...


11

Reasons for Arabs starting the war during Ramadan: Arab attacked Israel on October 6, 1973. That year, October was the month of Ramadan. But the main reason for attack on this day was Yom Kippur festival, which was on this day. Yom Kippur also known as Day of Atonement, is the holiest day of the year for the Jewish people. Arabs were defeated in all ...


11

In 2002, the leader of the Palestinian Authority Yasser Arafat said he would accept the Taba agreement in the terms put forward by President Bill Clinton 18 months earlier. Back in January 2001, the Taba summit had reached an impasse when both (Israeli and Palestinian) negociation teams still had reservations while Clinton had to quit the White House and ...


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