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Hot answers tagged

83

Japanese AC power outlets were first standardised in 1926 with the publication of the "挿込型接続器標準仕様書" (lit., "Standard for a Insertable Connector"), which became JIS C 8303. At the time, Japan was barely an industrial nation, and generally relied on imported power outlets. The leading designs up for consideration were thus the German Schuko and the American "2-...


79

The total land area of Japan is around 146,000 square miles. 20% of that works out around 29,000 square miles or 18.6 million acres. The population of Tokugawa japan was around 30 million people. 80% of that is 24 million people. This gives each farmer roughly 3/4s of an acre. The basic unit of land in Japan was the cho, which was roughly 2.5 acres. ...


47

Question: Was Japan known to be a potential threat to the USA in the 10 year period prior to 1941 Short Answer Yes some military experts did realize the inevitability of war between the United States and Japan as early as 1912. Most did not up until the late 1930s. No conventional wisdom in the 1930's would not permit the American public to ...


36

Yes, that would be the Kenpeitai. It was a military police corps, founded in 1881. The kenpeitai had jurisdiction everywhere within the Japanese empire and their conquered territories. Although it was a military police corps, everyone fell under their jurisdiction. Not just the military, civilians as well. The naval equivalent was the Tokkeitai. Both ...


25

Japan had been an ally of the United Kingdom since the Anglo-Japanese Alliance of 1902. That alliance had been renewed in 1905, following the Treaty of Portsmouth that formally ended the Russo-Japanese War of 1904-05, and again in 1911. The impact of the alliance was that it facilitated Japan's entry into the war on the side of the UK and her allies (...


18

The answer by sempaiscuba is very good. I just want to discuss the background of the situation a bit. Around the 1860's, Japan had to grant extraterritorial rights to various European powers that were engaged in colonialism. Many in power in Japan were well aware of what the European powers had done to China before, during, and after the Opium wars. Not ...


15

Yes, at least one member of the Nazi party is known to have been horrified by the actions of the Japanese Imperial Army. It depends on what you understand by the (plural) term the Nazis I would, in this historical context, understand this as the Government or leadership of Germany or Japan both of which, together with Italy, were allies with ...


12

A Gallup poll conducted just prior to the Pearl Harbour attack in 1941 found that: 52% of Americans expected war with Japan. 27% did not. 21% had no opinion. So there's that.


10

Some people did, most didn't. Billy Mitchell, among others, warned. But most people didn't see those funny little yellow men with thick glasses and hilarious swords (stereotype of the day) as really dangerous. Not for America, anyway. Yes, the massacre of Nanking was widely known, but that was somewhere far, far away. In 1937 there had been an incident in ...


10

This answers primarily the first version of the question that is still evidenced in the misconception of the title, and thus the rest of this answer is still relevant to read in conjunction with semaphore's answer, which would otherwise re-inforce these misconceptions: Q Why does Japan use the same type of AC power outlet as the US? This is actually not ...


9

I have an envelope (and the letter within) cancelled aboard USS Missouri in Tokyo Bay on Sept 2, 1945, sent via air mail to Norfolk VA. It has a six cent air mail stamp. See below, gently censored just because I feel like it. I'd have to go find another box of mail to see what it cost to send a return letter. . . it's probably in the attic somewhere. I'...


8

No, they did not. Imperial Japan never subscribed to the racial ideology of the Nazis. Instead, like many in East Asia at the time, they adopted a somewhat self-deprecating racial attitude; as they enthusiastically adopted modern Western practices during the Meiji Restoration, there appeared a strain of thought that the Western races were superior to the ...


7

Background Timeline of 1945: Feb - firebombing of Dresden Feb/Mar - battle of Iwo Jima Apr 12 - Truman becomes president. May 30 - Groves and Stimson begin to butt heads over targeting Kyoto. Jun 16 - committee rejects a demonstration bombing Jul 16 - Trinity test Jul 25 - Truman's diary entry Jul 30 - torpedoing of the Indianapolis Aug 6 - Hiroshima ...


7

That article kind of glossed over a rather complicated subject. The oft-quoted conclusion of the Strategic Bombing Survey packed many separate claims into one sentence, and different historians have identified flaws with different parts. Giving conventional air power too much credit. Firstly, the methodology employed by the Strategic Bombing Survey is not ...


6

Question: Was the attack on the American forces at Pearl Harbor totally unexpected? Short Answer Commanders across the pacific had been warned for weeks of an impending Japanese attack. Specifically Admiral Kimmel and General Short in command at Hawaii's navy and army forces respectively, had responded to these warnings and taken steps to safeguard ...


5

Question: What were the flaws in the U.S. Strategic Bombing Survey? According to this source, "Some historians have identified flaws in the [U.S. Strategic Bombing] survey, based on contemporary evidence." Background: A key allied strategy in WWII was strategic bombing. Large bombers capable of delivering many air ...


5

The online glossary from the New Zealand Philatelic Federation has this to say on the subject of postcards with divided backs: Divided back The earliest postcards carried the recipient’s address and postage stamp on one side and the message was written on the ‘picture’ side. Such cards are known as undivided back postcards. In 1902 Great Britain ...


5

Question: Why, in the US, is Japanese brutality ignored compared with the Nazi brutality in WW2? Short Answer: Although the United States did conduct Japanese War Crimes trials in Tokyo following the war(Tokyo War Crimes Trials). A series of political decisions and global events in the 40's worked to mitigate and suppress US public knowledge of the ...


5

First of all, the question is based on an incorrect assumption: the Japanese actually widely use Western utensils (fork, spoon, knife). This is generally missed because of the context. The long answer is that everyday Japanese food consists of food of very different origins, and utensils often follow accordingly. Generally, food of Japanese and Chinese ...


5

Question: Why did WWI include Japan? Short Answer In the late 19th and early 20th centuries or the Meiji Period(October 23, 1868 - July 30, 1912), the Empire of Japan underwent a rapid expansion; fueled by a feudalistic military based economy and European technology (largely from Britain). Japan chose to enter WWI because it saw an opportunity to continue ...


5

As long as the US was willing to keep fighting, nothing would have been strategically decisive for Japan. Quoting from this page that explores a Japanese victory at Midway: In other words, even if it had lost catastrophically at the Battle of Midway, the United States Navy still would have broken even with Japan in carriers and naval air power by ...


5

Preamble Personally (ignore any moderator diamond you might see next to my name - this is just my opinion as a user of History:SE), I think this question should probably have remained closed, since your main question: "Why did Japan never “apologize” enough for World War 2?" appears to be fully answered by the Wikipedia article you cite, and would thus ...


4

The Japanese were never fully isolated from the rest of the world. They're far closer to the Eurasian continent and were not geographically isolated any manner that compares to contact with the Native Americans or the American continent(s). The Tokugawa Shogunate did restrict trade with the outside world during the Edo period (1603-1868) but they didn't ...


3

You shouldn't give too much credit to the idea of a coherent Nazi ideology. One commenter put it: there was no substantial racial theory that would be official in Germany except "Jews are bad" and "Russians are natural slaves" because they are "Slavs" (the words coincide in German) This is correct. Moreover, Hitler's confused racialism didn't seem to bend ...


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