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Hitler's Meeting with Japanese Ambassador Oshima on 3 January 1942 On 3 January 1942, Hitler met the Japanese ambassador, Hiroshi Oshima, to discuss his future plans and the potential for co-operation between the two powers. A German observer of Hitler's meeting with Oshima noted: ...For the time being [Hitler] did not intend to carry out any more ...


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It appears that the answer to this question has more to do with Japans history rather then Tokyo's recent development into a mega-city. A Brief history The capital of Japan changed from Kyoto to Tokyo, then Edo, in 1868 to symbolize the transition of power from the traditional Shogun to the new Emperor Meji. With this shift in power Japan as whole began to ...


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Soviet Landing at Shumshu (from Russian Wikipedia) At 0238 on August 18, the coastal Soviet battery from Cape Lopatka on the Kamchatka coast opened fire and fired until 0450. At 0422 the landing of the advanced naval landing detachment began (a marine battalion minus one company), machine gun and mortar companies, machine gun and anti-tank rifle ...


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I found a much better and more direct site. after googling. How many tanks there were on the Shumushu island is on debate, but even if how many tanks there were, Soviet had about 100 anti tank rifles, The picture of soldiers with the anti-tank rifle. 18日午前5時ごろ島の中央部へ進出を開始したソ連軍に対し、真っ白なシャツに鉢巻姿の池田大佐は部下たちに「赤穂浪士たらんとするとするものは一歩前に出よ。白虎隊たらんとするものは手を上げよ。」...


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According to this reference the Soviets fielded anti-tank guns and were aided by fog: The 11th Tank Regiment also attacked the Soviet forces. About 40 Japanese tanks run over the Soviet soldiers and rushed into the beach. The Soviet soldiers fired to the tanks with AT guns, which were unloaded on the beach in a hurry. As a fog gathered over the beach, it ...


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I'm not seeing anything specifically about the tanks, so something looking at a full action report would probably be a better answer. However, just looking over what's there... Tanks can be quite vulnerable to aircraft, and to anything with really big guns outside of their own limited firing range that they can't get at, like a ship or offshore gun battery. ...


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The term manga first came into common usage in the late 18th century with the publication of such works as Santō Kyōden's picturebook Shiji no yukikai (1798), and in the early 19th century with such works as Aikawa Minwa's Manga hyakujo (1814) and the celebrated Hokusai Manga books (1814–1834) containing assorted drawings from the sketchbooks of the ...


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I found the direct answer. (To be updated later). Conclusion Yes, the government bought the houses and demolished (by today's JR East). Hereunder the text under the quote in bold italic is the translation. From this statement of the Board Of Audit Of Japan. 日本国有鉄道大阪幹線工事局で、東海道幹線増設工事に伴い、京都府乙訓郡大山崎村所在の福田某所有の宅地、建物等の買収費および移転補償費として、昭和37年4月および5月、同人に総額215,010,...


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probably the only Japanese here. I would like to introduce you a page which analyzes why the Japanese so-called Anime ( please note, not "Animation" ) became kind of a symbol of one of the huge industries(also culturally) world wide. There is a fair bit to translate so I will gradually update this post to cover the full translation. On the other hand, each ...


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The Dutch hired Japanese mercenaries to conquer the Banda islands in 1621. They were not gentle. @Tom Au alludes to this, I think.


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This mainly took place in the "interregnum" between the Muromachi (ended 1573) and Tokagawa periods (began 1603) when there was a power vacuum that left a lot of samurai "stranded." As in the answer to another question, this occurred in Thailand, where the king had originally hired samurai as mercenaries, but they tried to take over his kingdom. Isolated ...


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Yes, there were. Below are examples from Siam, the Philippines, China, Mexico and Indonesia. Ayutthaya (Siamese Kingdom) Probably the best known one was Yamada Nagamasa (born 1590, died 1630) in the Ayutthaya Kingdom. Over a period of 15 years, he ...rose from the low Thai nobility rank of Khun to the senior of Ok-ya, his title becoming Ok-ya ...


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There would seem to be quite a number of possibilities, including: Businessmen Japanese business interests in India were extensive between the two world wars. Putting this together with "In the 1880s, 23 percent of prominent Japanese businessmen were from the samurai class; by the 1920s 35% were." (as cited by ed.hank from Wikipedia Samurai in his comment),...


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I live in Japan and have lived here 35 years. The Samurai disappeared in the 1860-1870's (sword-bearing was banned in 1876). So while he was from a samurai family, that wouldn't have meant much between 1919 and 1939. In the late Edo period, many of the smarter samurai became bureaucrats, sending young (mostly men) people around the world to learn and acquire ...


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