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Short Answer Tripoli declared war against the United States on 14 May 1801. Detailed Answer At first glance this seemed like a trivial question. Surprisingly, the answer appears to be shrouded behind several contradictory dates in internet circulation. I'll try to explain why I believe those answers are incorrect below. (A) 9 January 1801 I didn't ...


6

Henry Adams' History of the United States of America During the First Administration of Thomas Jefferson explains the developments e.g. in the following excerpt (pp. 80). In short, it seems that Jefferson was "just" being pragmatic in a matter that he deemed important for the nation and for his party. ... the President, according to his letters, had ...


5

According to Stolba's Music in the Life of Thomas Jefferson, his music library contained no works by Mozart. If Jefferson ever heard Mozart's 40th, it may have been Alexander Reinagle that brought it to his attention. Reinagle was a composer and impresario of musical theater and a personal friend of Mozart's as early as 1764. Drummond's Early German Music ...


3

"To date, no evidence has surfaced that such a conversation actually took place. The earliest known appearance of this story is in Harper's New Monthly Magazine in 1884 (the transcription above is from this source).[1] It was repeated by M.D. Conway in his Omitted Chapters of History Disclosed in the Life and Papers of Edmund Randolph, first published in ...


3

Thomas Jefferson in France, 1787. Source: Study.com - Thomas Jefferson as the Ambassador to France Q: How did Thomas Jefferson's time in France influence his views of women? A: Evidently, not much Thomas Jefferson was in France from 1784 - 1789, first as Minister Plenipotentiary (sent by the Congress of the Confederation) along with John Adams and ...


2

I had doubts of the reference when I used it for my book: I decide it was likely genuine. As I note in my reference, drinking tea from a saucer dates it to the appropriate time period. By 1869, "to pour tea or coffee into a saucer... are acts of awkwardness never seen in polite society." So if invented, someone got some very specific details correct.


2

The part which is wrong will be discontented in proportion to the importance of the facts they misconceive. . . . The remedy is to set them right as to facts, pardon & pacify them. Those who are discontented will take up arms; the response of civil society is to set them right as to the facts, then pardon and pacify those whose contentment is newly ...


2

Question: What developments in Jefferson's life caused him to withdraw from the topic of slavery in political discourse? Where Jefferson once saw slavery as the central flaw in Virginia, a sentiment he forcibly expressed in his Notes on the State of Virginia, he later “began to adjust his thinking to concentrate instead upon his ...


2

The whole area of Jefferson and his stance on slavery is hotly debated (and given Jefferson's role in the founding of America one that can rile people up) so I'm going to try not to be too controversial here. Jefferson was indeed quite forceful in his words regarding slavery in Notes on the State of Virginia, however his stance in that text isn't exactly ...


2

Question: Jefferson seemed to believe for some time that women were consigned to domestic duties while men were tasked food, shelter, protection, public debate, and politics. He went so far, in 1816, to declare that for men and women to cross this division and mix promiscuously in public meetings would produce "deprivation of morals and ambiguity of issue."...


2

The official story is that the inscription is taken from Jefferson’s Notes on the State of Virginia, with the last two sentences being from a letter to George Washington. A manuscript. The quote isn't some black-and-white assertion against slavery. Thomas Jefferson had complex and evolving relationships with slaves. He owned lots of them (inherited some 135 ...


2

Generally, I believe the best place to find old copies of city newspapers is in the archives of the city in question's Public Library. I know mine has every back issue of the two major local papers (at one time we had two) on microfiche, and perhaps in more modern forms now as well. So I'd think the best place to look would be the Richmond Public Library. ...


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I have had an interest in this reported conversation between the two "fathers" because it involves handleless cups which were standard tea and coffee cups in their time. (handles came later). Hot liquid was poured from the pot into the cup, and then into the bowl (which we now refer to as a saucer) to cool before drinking. One drank from this shallow ...


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Historian J. L. Bell has done some research on this tl:dr He believes this is a spurious quotation. My ego leads me to quote the following from Bell, which states far more clearly the concept I tried to articulate in my other answer(s). It’s worth noting that the “senatorial saucer” anecdote contrasts the wisdom of Washington with the “zealous,” ...


1

These apparently cover a wide range of time-periods, since it seems that Madison was paranoid about many of his correspondence's being discovered. The Library of Congress details some of them. Most of the early ciphers that Madison used were keyword polyalphabetic code systems involving a complex interaction of a keyword with alphabets and numbers in a ...


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