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24

Last year, a team headed by Steve Fine of the Yeshiva University Center for Israeli Studies in New York which had been examining portions of the arch since 2012 announced: High resolution three-dimensional scans of the Menorah and the deification reliefs were made, and part of the Menorah relief was examined to determine whether any traces of paint ...


23

Yes. Quite closely resembling: See that structure in the South-East? The temple mount? That's were the Knights Templar took their name from. This is almost a fixed point in time. Plan of twelfth-century Jerusalem Adrian J.Boas: "Crusader Archaeology. The Material Culture of the Latin East", Routledge: London, New York, 1999, p13. ...


14

Wikipedia - Siege of Jerusalem All of the contemporary records, whether Hebrew or otherwise, rely on regnal dating systems. There are two points of confusion, particularly when dating the reigns of Israelite or Jewish kings: which calendar is used and when does the first year start. I'll try to clarify farther down using Queen Elizabeth II as an example. ...


10

Judaism grew out of the Canaanite religion, in the Canaanite area. So for most of the early existence of the region it was split up in independent areas, probably some sort of city-states. In the later period two confederacies seem to have emerged, one centered around Kadesh, the other around Megiddo. The Canaanites lost independence some time during the ...


10

This contemporary NY Times article most likely contains all the information you can get on this: Kaiser Wilhelm II was on a pilgrimage tour, in best Christian tradition. It's not clear whether anarchists actually tried to kill him, these were rumors. There is no definitive evidence and there was no assassination attempt. Left-wing anarchists opposed the ...


7

Thanks to the "heads-up" I got from your comment on my answer to your last question earlier, I had a chance to do some research on this today (although I'm not sure about your page numbering in Breasted. You may have a different edition to mine). While translations like the ones in Breasted (pp 175-192) and Lichtheim (pp 29-35) are excellent resources for ...


7

Visitors from other lands You have listed the most common languages spoken in Jerusalem already -- Hebrew, Greek, Aramaic, and even some Latin -- but the passage in Acts that you refer to answers your question: there were Jews living all over the place in the ancient world, even before the diaspora after the two wars with the Romans in the first century (...


7

The Jewish population was not expelled in 70. At least Josephus, our the main source on that war does not say this. Jerusalem was destroyed, and the Temple was robbed, burned and closed (closed few years after the siege). He also mentions that lands belonging to the Jews were confiscated. But he does not say that population was expelled.


6

First temple: 30 cubits tall (I Kings 6:2), with an entryway 120 cubits tall (II Chronicles 3:4). Second temple: 100 cubits tall (Mishnah, Middot 4:6). Elevation: the highest point of the present-day Temple Mount is about 740 meters above sea level. There are various theories about where on the mountain the temples were located, so they may have been a ...


6

Source from wikipedia There has been some debate as to when the second siege of Jerusalem took place. Though there is no dispute that Jerusalem fell the second time in the summer month of Tammuz (Jeremiah 52:6), William F. Albright dates the end of Zedekiah's reign (and the fall of Jerusalem) to 587 BC, whereas Edwin R. Thiele offers 586 BC.[10] ...


4

The Kaiser wasn't there for mere pilgrimage. At the time Germany was heavily invested in developing the Ottoman Empire. Germany had no significant colonies, so sought to make the weak Ottomans their economic vassal. The major project was a rail system from "Berlin to Baghdad" which would compete with the Suez Canal. There was also a lot of German non Jewish ...


4

One of the main sources, Cassius Dio, says that Hadrian renamed Jerusalem, and as a result of this the uprising started: This source is considered trustworthy in general.


4

You observed correctly. The Second Temple was built upon Temple Mount. Around 20 B.C., King Herod the Great lavishly renovated the site, and in the process endowed the hill with a retaining wall. This structure became the only remnants of the Second Temple after its destruction in A.D. 70, most famously in the form of the Wailing Wall. In fact, however, ...


4

An addition to other already excellent answers: The Western "Wailing Wall" is constructed at the very top from smaller stones placed initially by the Roman X legion. However, the large stones below that - typically about 12 tons each - which make up most of "The Wailing Wall" are the remnants of the wall built by Herod the Great's engineers. Touch the wall ...


2

According to Josephus's account Jerusalem was razed to the ground & most of those who didn't perish from starvation in the seige were killed defending the Temple. From what Josephus writes it seems like there was: No Jerusalem. It suffered a similar fate to Carthage by being utterly destroyed. There weren't many Jews left to expel. We know many ...


1

It's all spelled out in the original document. On a cursory reading, apparently there was no plan for separate citizenship of the City of Jerusalem.


1

I am an Ultra Orthodox Hasidic Jew, very well versed in the Talmud and Jewish tradition, and I am seeing here a lot of confusion, so I will try to clarify. (Note that I tried as much as possible to reference sources, but not everything has available online sources or even English sources, as many things are just in Hebrew Religious texts, as well as basic ...


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