10

These records have been commercially available in print since 1967, when it was published under the title Haisen no Kiroku (敗戦の記録, lit. Records of Defeat) by Hara Shobo. This included materials spanning from March 1944 to late 1945. Here is an Amazon.jp link to a 2005 edition. A related publication is the Sugiyama Memos (杉山メモ), written by General Sugiyama ...


8

Yes the presses were in the offices in Fleet Street. For a picture see wikipedia picture entitled "New_Daily_Telegraph_Offices_Fleet_Street_ILN_1882" from the Illustrated London News in 1882 Another article gives this as credit: HERITAGE-IMAGES/PRINT COLLECTOR


7

All of the activities of the airship were considered interesting by the newspapers. The New York Times had 5 or 6 articles on the Hindenburg in April alone. The Hindenburg was by far the fastest way for a passenger to cross the Atlantic at the time, taking only about 70 hours (3 days) compared to regular ships which took about a week, twice as long. It's ...


5

In 1900 Hufvudstadsbladet (Swedish language newspaper in Finland) had a circulation of 17,500, putting it far ahead of the nearest Finnish language rival, Uusi Soumetar at 11,300.(Conflict and Compromise in Multilingual Societies: Finland, Volym 3) But Swedish is one of the two national languages of Finland so it may not count.


5

It probably depends on where. One important social meeting place at which news would be exchanged was actually coffeehouses. This holds true for the Ottoman Empire, which originally popularised the drinking of coffee after the taking of Yemen. From there it spread to Europe, where coffeehouses also became an important focal point for the transmission of ...


5

I imagine the town crier would have been an important source of news prior to mass-literacy.


4

I found a few notes here as to what happened with the paper in this article on the New York World. In the 20 years since the sons took over, the paper seemed to have a slow decline, part of this may be due to the editorial content, but also by the slow decline in columnists. These were a huge draw for newspapers at the time, the Journal had Nellie Bly who ...


4

A newspaper in Sacramento the capitol of California, probable had a fairly large circulation. If looking for as large or larger papers I figured I would look for larger populations than the city of Sacramento in the state of California. California was admitted to the Union in September 9, 1850, and was included in the United States Census of 1850 ([see ...


4

Until early 1871, when cable communication between Singapore and London was first established, it would take quite a while for information to travel between the two locations. Suez shortened the trip abruptly beginning in 1869, and there were many improvements to travel speeds throughout the century, but it was always measured in weeks. That pretty much ...


4

There are well-attested examples of the use of nicknames for popular political figures going all the way back to Athens and Rome. Examples of this would be Pericles, who was nicknamed "Squill-head" (he apparently had a very large and bulbous head - think "Egg-head" in our usage) and Caligula ("Little Boots"). Other Athenian political nicknames included ...


3

The Guidelines for news media issued by the Pentagon for the 1991 Gulf War were released into the public domain during the legal case Nation Magazine v. United States Department of Defense, and were included as footnotes in the paper Press Censorship and Access Restrictions During the Persian Gulf War: A First Amendment Analysis by Michelle D. Boydston, ...


2

Here is a timeline of British Press developments that may be helpful. The Daily Telegraph was launched in 1855, and became a "London" morning paper in the same year. Note, also, that the stamp tax was abolished in 1855, and the paper duty in 1861; these had formerly been deterrents to cheap, "mass" newspapers. It is striking that the Irish Daily was ...


2

A more general answer can be given. Transatlantic flights of airships were rare events. No comparison with modern airplane fights, and with regular ships crossings at that time. So it is not surprising that they had attention of the media. And they were available mostly to the "rich and famous", and these people always have attention of the media whatever ...


2

One must also mention the pamphlet, which was mighty popular back then. Here is what the Britannica has to say about the 16th century: Pamphlets were among the first printed materials, and they were widely used in England, France, and Germany. The first great age of pamphleteering was inspired by the religious controversies of the early 16th century....


2

Judging by Jenson (1988), Using the typewriter: Secretaries, reporters and authors, 1880–1930 (author's Twitter), and assuming similar developments on both sides of the Atlantic, the answer would be yes: The first claim, that the typewriter was deployed when it "made sense," is sup- ported by the rapidity with which the typewriter was adopted in American ...


1

Before the cable communication, and long time after that, newspapers from England were available in colonies only by subscription, and they arrived long after their publication. There is ample evidence of this in the literature. People in colonies learned about the news with large delay.


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