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46

Yes, but for fixed periods of (for example) six months or 1 or 2 years rather than for life. This section of the 13th Amendment, ratified on the 6th of December, 1865, was controversial from the outset. Slavery Under the Thirteenth Amendment: Race and the Law of Crime and Punishment in the PostCivil War South by Peter Wallenstein in the Louisiana Law Review (...


8

The one people seem to be drawing on a lot (I found two recent articles about it) was the raid on Donald Manno in 2008.* The better of the two was here on Reuters. In 2008, Manno’s law office was raided by federal investigators pursuing a racketeering case against a suspected mobster who was a client and friend of the lawyer. The FBI copied Manno’s ...


5

Criminal justice in USSR in the post war period was performed by "People's Courts" (they existed in 1937-1989). They consisted of judges and "people's jury". The judges were elected by popular vote for the term of 5 years. The jurors were elected for 2 years by meetings of "labor collectives" (factories an other enterprises). All elections in Soviet Union ...


5

Until the present case, what was the most significant or consequent of these actions in the United States? I don't know about most significant consequences, but I'll note the idea has been around for at least a century. United States v Clark (1933) references the limits of attorney-client privilege while dealing with the limits of juror privilege. Long ...


3

The prominent attorney Lynne Stewart had her records raided in 2002 over her work with Omar Abdel-Rahman, the "Blind Sheik" linked to the 1993 World Trade Center bombing and the 1997 Luxor massacre. Her contact with her client was subject to special administrative measures that she may not have honored. Prosecutors believed she was relaying messages between ...


2

In many jurisdictions, the state of mind of the perpetrator may affect the punishment for a crime, or even if an act constitutes a crime. The old Latin term is mens rea. Killing in self-defense is a good example. It is no crime if the perpetrator acted in the genuine belief that he or she was under attack, but it is a crime if the perpetrator did not think ...


1

Your question is trying to be so precise that it embeds its own answer. You ask: This quesiton is not about [the human rights abuse that is convict leasing], but about true, pre-Civil War-type chattel slavery. That is, did a court ever tell a defendant something like, "We find you guilty of Second Degree Aggravated Mopery with Intent to Do This and the ...


1

Given your role as an educator, can I assume you are sufficiently aware of the endless debates on social contract and this useful package on Rousseau? Obviously, we are not here to discuss Enlightenment philosophies but it provides a framework to view this answer (a certain perspective). The short answer is: Yes, there were. The steppe nomads (semi-nomads, ...


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