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9

The actual quote from Forsyth's book is: Captain Magnus Karl von Böhm, attempted to restrain the Russian soldiers and make them treat the Itelmens as human beings, and to introduce justice and honesty into the administration of Kamchatka, according to lengthy instructions issued by Catherine the Great. p142 I think the 'lengthy instructions' referred to ...


7

I think I found Semyonov's "old book"! This is Sgibnev's Historical Essay of Most Important Events in Kamchatka, 1650-1855, published in 1869. The story there is more or less as follows: On January 13, 1758 fourier Shakhturov arrived in Nizhnekamchatsk to select Kamchadal girls for the court. He brought to the Kamchatka toyons the Sovereign's order giving ...


7

In a letter from Baranov to Shelikhov, written in July 1793, he mentions an English ship named Phoenix. It doesn't explicitly mention when the ship arrived there or if it had wintered there. Here I encountered the English ship Phoenix, 2 masts, 85 feet long. This ship has sailed from East Indian to Canton, Manila, and then to Nootka in America, and from ...


5

According to I. V. Viter, in 1767 the town population couldn't support the church, so it was moved to nearby Paratunka. According to Svetlana G. Federova and her coauthor Yakov M. Svet, Captain Charles Clerke was buried in 1779 "on the high northern shore of the Petropavlovsk harbor near a new church that was being built". According to A. Sgibnev, quoted ...


4

William "Василий" Tolman was a New Englander born in 1793. According to the book "Тайны камчатских имен", he arrived in Petropavlovsk, Kamchatka in 1813. A story about one of his daughters, long settled in the USA, getting in touch with her brothers was published in several American newspapers in the 1890s. According to this story, her father had been ...


4

Before the snowmobile, the only options for land travel in such a region would have been reindeer sleigh or snowshoes. I can find no mention of a navigable river. Here is a fairly detailed account on Wikipedia that seems to support the conclusion that no successful attempt was made to explore the southern peninsula over land. The main indigenous people ...


4

James Forsyth's 'A History of the Peoples of Siberia' suggests that settler constructions were similar to those used in Siberia. Before the Russian's arrival(in the early eighteenth century) the local Itelman population lived in large villages. In summer they lived in: leaf-covered tent-like shelters standing on platforms raised well above the ground ...


4

According to Archibald Campbell's account "A voyage around the world", the Petropavlovsk houses of Russians were thus: ... with the exception of the Governor's house, [the town] consists of huts one story high, built of logs and covered with thatch. In a few of them the windows are glazed with talc, but more generally the intestine of the seal supplies ...


4

According to Wikipedia, there are several places named Petropavlovsk in the huge country of Russia. No surprise. Petropavlovsk-Kamchatsky is in Kamchatka and should be the correct Petropavlovsk. I note that according to Google maps there is a body of water southwest of Petropavlovsk named Vilyuchinskaya Bukhta. That means Vilyuchinskaya Bay. It would ...


3

Helpful comments above indicate that the disease was syphilis. This is backed up by secondary sources: Jones's Empire of Extinction describes it as "rampant". Jochelson's The Kamchadals called it "widespread". Stern's Marginal Linguistic Identities reports one in three natives suffering. Davidson's Geographical Pathology says it was "very prevalent".


3

I believe punishment is an inaccurate term. Two cultures, one earnestly striving to be a pure meritocracy and the other firmly entrenched in the recognition of birth privilege and honour, are here intertwined with each other. Assignment to Kamchatka, and other eastern posts, becomes the solution for how to reward behaviour seen as beneficial by the ...


3

According to James R. Gibson's "Feeding the Russian Fur Trade", supply ships from Okhotsk visited Petropavlovsk in this period annually around October. Several round-the-world voyages (Nadezhda, Kamchatka) and foreign trading vessels (Lark, Sylph) also arrived.


2

Wildes seems mistaken about the cannon's destination: it never went to Kamchatka. Stephan in The Kuril Islands cites Lensen in reporting that after their raids, Khvostov and Davydov headed to Okhotsk. Lensen also says that upon arrival Commandant Bukharin imprisoned the two and helped himself to the booty they brought from Sakhalin and Iturup. The cannon ...


2

My assumption about ships' libraries may have been in error. Chamisso, in "A voyage around the world...", wrote about his trip on the Rurik, on which in 1816 he found in Petropavlovsk not just books, but several volumes useful for his expedition. According to Chamisso, these books had been accumulating in Kamchatka "since the time of Bering" (early 1740s). ...


2

TL; DR Cabri doesn't seem to have been in Kamchatka for more than a few months, from late July / early August 1804. He left Kamchatka, and travelled to St. Petersburg in the company of Count Fyodor Ivanovich Tolstoy, departing in late 1804. While in Kamchatka, Cabri seems to have been seen as something of a scientific curiosity. Extracts from two of ...


1

Apparently the rule did exist. John Dundas Cochrane clarified its origin in his Narrative of a pedestrian journey through Russia and Siberian Tartary, from the frontiers of China to the Frozen sea and Kamtchatka; performed during the years 1820, 1821, 1822, and 1823: Much benefit has been derived to the colony from the exertions of the present Chief, ...


1

Major Karl Magnus Von Behm was my 5xgreat grandfather. His wife Eva Von Borg was a friend of the Empress Catherine 11. She wanted Alaska to be opened up for settlers and the Major was to find a doctor willing to go. He was to build forts, open up the infrastructure and set up a good administration. He was recommended to her as being an honest man. He ...


1

According to Город над Авачинской бухтой by Витер, Magnus Carl von Böhm, appointed governor of Kamchatka in 1773, sent 32 soldiers with two officers to Petropavlovsk. They built an artillery battery at the entrance to the harbor. So far the answer seems to be between 1773 and 1801.


1

The general rule is that the command is with the most relevant officer. E.g., an amphibious operation is commanded by the naval commander. I.e., when a ship lands an amphibious force on an enemy shore, the overall commanding officer is the ship's captain, not the amphibious force's commander. Moreover, even if the ship is lost and all troops are now ashore, ...


1

According to James Gibson's "Otter Skins, Boston Ships and China Goods", the ship was the Halcyon of Captain Charles Barkley. At Petropavlovsk (the only practical place to winter in Kamchatka) in 1793, it attempted to sell "ironwware, rum, anchors, cables, cordage" but despite the goods' low prices, the commandant said he had no authority to buy anything, ...


1

The Itelmen or Kamchadal were the native inhabitants of the southern part of Kamchatka while the Koryaks lived at the northern end. The presence of the isolated southern tribe suggests to me that land routes were once in use. There is more documentation of access during the Russian era, though. Before the first successful sea voyage from Okhotsk to ...


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