Hot answers tagged

22

Your example seems incorrect. William of Orange was William III of England, whereas the other was William III of the Netherlands. William of Orange was also William III in the Netherlands, but as Stadtholderate under the House of Orange-Nassau, while the other William III you found was King of the Netherlands. Lastly, as point out by LangLangC in the ...


19

The Inca might have been the largest non-literate society in history. Allow me to explain by way of two definitional digressions. Any society has peripheral or marginal members that are less in tune. We won't know quite where to draw the line, and of course the population data we have is worse than incomplete. More so, the concept of society that we all ...


18

You might want to consider Denmark and the House of Estridsen: Valdemar III the Young (co-ruled 1215 - 31) Valdemar III Eriksøn von Schleswig (ruled 1326 - 29) 1. Valdemar the Young or III was co-ruler with his father Valdemar II from 1215 to 1231. Valdemar the Young is sometimes referred to as Valdemar III for example his tombstone reads in Latin: ...


17

Speaking very generally, merchant groups were relatively marginalized in all pre-modern societies. They formed networks across city-states in different regions, but were not allowed to take strong political footholds in more centralized states. Political rulers saw economic power as a threat, a (sometimes necessary) evil and were generally successful in ...


14

SHORT ANSWER In your case there was a man William who was William III, Prince of Orange, Stadtholder of the Netherlands, and King William III of England (1650-1702) and there was another man known as William III, King of the Netherlands (1817-1890). They were two different members of the same dynasty who were both the third William to hold their position ...


13

If one interprets this question as Why were the Merovingians so reviled at the peak of their power?, then the answer is easy: they weren't. At the peak of their power, the frankish kingdoms were the most powerful geopolitical entities in Western Europe, were recognized as such and their kings were treated accordingly. The early Carolingians reviled the ...


12

It was Norway. This is the story of Harald Fairhair in the late 9th century. Harald inherited one of a number of petty kingdoms west of modern Oslo. He proposed marriage to Gyda, the daughter of King Erik of a nearby kingdom of similar size. She wanted to be queen of Norway, so she refused to marry anyone who was not king of "all" Norway. She had created a ...


10

There is as far as I know no known historical record of anyone with no legal claim to a kingdom or other significant administrative territory (ie not just a farm or manor or other owned area) winning that territory in one-on-one combat with the sovereign of that territory or his representative, without having an army to back him up. And why would there be? ...


9

As T.E.D. already mentioned, titles were tied to the territory, and mostly didn't change unless a feudal lord higher up in the "foodchain" granted one of its vassals a higher title (it usually came with further land and possessions as well). Also, once you fulfilled certain requirements to create a title, you could do so (great example, the British Empire, ...


8

It seems most likely to me it would have been a local Sept leader, or at best a Earl or Laird, who got run out of his territories in the course of typical Scottish infighting. Over generations of retelling this guy could easily have been eventually promoted all the way to a "King", as it makes the family's origins sound more respectable. You would be ...


7

There were two Henry VII rulers as kings of Germany, the first of whom co-ruled with and pre-deceased his father. He is often referred to as Henry (VII) to distinguish him from the later Henry VII, much admired by Dante. Some kingdoms do not number crowned kings who co-ruled with their fathers but never in their own right. Thus, Henry II of England's son ...


6

The African state of Mthethwa might count. It was a nation that existed from around 1775 to 1817 that predated the Zulu Kingdom and, as far as we know, had no formal writing system. The nation used military innovations such as the system of age regiments (amabutho) that would come to be utilized by the Zulu empire. While not as big as the Inca, it was around ...


6

I am not a historian, but here's what I've found from a cursory look at the literature. There's Pre-Aksumite, but that demonym isn't exclusive to D'MT. From "Punt and Aksum: Egypt and the Horn of Africa.": There are extensive remains of a Pre-Aksumite culture (that is, the kingdom of D'MT in particular) in the area surrounding Aksum, although little ...


5

Pieter Geerkens gave a good answer on feudalism, but missed the mark with the conclusion that the elective monarchies appeared from areas that were not part of the Carolingian Empire, because of a lack of feudalism. Of course, both East and West Francia elected kings. Hnece, the answer to this part of the question: In Poland and Hungary kingship was not ...


5

I guess he could be anyone, but one who more or less fits is Edward IV of England – he was one of four brothers who survived into adulthood, was the fourth king by the name Edward, had four sons (including an illegitimate one), and his reign began on March 4, 1461. Maybe there's more trivia around about him matching the number 4.


5

Olivier Bernier's biography 'Louis XIV' says, based on Mme de Motteville's account (II, 286): "Having seen the Queen in her bed, we went off home ... As soon as we had left, the gates of the Palais Royal were closed with the command to not open them again. The Queen got up again to think about her situation and confided her secret only to her First ...


4

This question is difficult because it is not clear what monarchy is absolute and whether such elected office should be called monarchy rather than something else (i.e., dictatorship). One of the basic features of monarchy is inheritance of the office. As such, all elected monarchs are quite borderline cases. That said, I can name the following cases upon ...


4

I don't know that the Merovingians were always reviled. According to Paul Freedman, even when they were quite weak and ineffective as rulers, they still enjoyed the prestige that accrued from having "the blood of Clovis [flowing] in their veins". Clearly, Clovis at least was still revered several generations after his death. Freedman suggests that the ...


3

Within the Roman/Byzantine empire there were: Constantine III (Western Roman Emperor) Constantine III (Byzantine emperor) Disputable because one may claim that these were two distinct political entities, or that the Western Roman Emperor was a usurper. Also Roman/Byzantine imperial names are a complicated matter - e.g. Caligula would have been known as "...


3

Welcome to History SE, Helena! Once the coup began, it's unlikely Queen Liliʻuokalani could have done much of anything to preserve the monarchy, or restore it once the provincial government was established. Hypothetically, even if we set aside the fact that the Queen was thoroughly opposed to engaging in armed hostilities, in the long run it's still highly ...


2

The kingdom of Sarawak, 500 000 pop., won by Sir Charles Vyner Brooke, later "white Raja of Sarawak" "With little more than his 140-ton sloop and a bit of help from a British warship, he made himself Rajah of Sarawak, a kingdom of deep jungle and broad rivers on the island of Borneo." http://www.nytimes.com/1986/07/13/travel/sarawak-a-kingdom-in-the-jungle....


2

Titles of nobility literally came with the territory. Thus if you rule a principality, you are a prince, if you rule a duchy, you are a duke, and if you rule a kingdom, you are a king. The main place it mattered was in dealing with other European nobility. In any social situation, kings got priority over dukes, who got priority over princes. Your Savoyard ...


2

Perhaps the Mali Empire or Zulu. I couldn't find anything about written records by themselves. If the Mali didn't write then they were probably much bigger, longer lasting and older than the Zulu kingdom.


2

An elaboration on my comment; the bad idea came from my distant cousin, John Adams! How ‘His Highness’ George Washington Became ‘Mr. President’


2

Emperor Harsha (also known as Harshavardhan, around 600 AD) had his widowed sister along with him in his official court. She was active in day to day politics as suggested by travellers of that time. source : Cambridge History of India (old version published in 1920, can be found royalty free)


2

While it is correct some women of noble houses have played role in medieval indian politics, it was not universal. Their roles varied from councillor, war leader & regents. Some even played at being King-makers. But those seem to be exceptional cases not the usual way. Normally, just like any other country in the world at that time, Women were not ...


2

Reign of Maria Theresa as Archduchess of Austria, Queen of Hungary and Croatia, etc., Queen of Bohemia, Duchess of Styria, Carinthia and Carnioila, etc. 1740 to 1780. Reign of Maria Theresa as Empress consort of Holy Roman Empire 1745-1765. Reign of Joseph II as sole Archduke of Austria, King of Hungary and Croatia, etc., King of Bohemia, Duke of Styria, ...


2

No, the Catholic Church did not have a Police force around 500 AD to arrest a British King. Some of the reasons why this was not so: Police, as it is known today, started to form during the 17th Century in the Roman Empire the army was commonly used where needed The Catholic Church, as a state authority, did not yet exist Kingdoms had envolved from ...


2

An addendum as regards William III (of England)...his number as used in the Netherlands before he became King of England referred to the Principality of Orange; which was an enclave within France and not very big, but was a sovereign, independent state nonetheless. He was also officially William II of Scotland (there had been a previous King of Scotland by ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible