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40

Everyone learnt from the Korean War and wished to avoid a repeat of a bloody direct Chinese-American fighting. At the onset of the escalated American involvement in 1965, Beijing made it clear where the Chinese line in the sand is: [I]f the Americans went beyond the bombing of the North and used ground forces to invade North Vietnam, China would have to ...


21

Hideyoshi's reasons were not singular. A number of factors motivated his invasion of Korea. Although speculative hypothesis regarding his mental state is popular, domestic pressure for expansion coupled with seemingly-promising opportunities sufficiently explains the decision. TL;DR: Hideyoshi needed land and to keep his soldiers occupied. Korea was an easy ...


13

Firstly, the South Korean soldiers are far more concerned about escalating possible situation. This is exemplified by how they are strict about making contact due to possible unwanted attention, hence the sunglasses on the SK soldiers. This is also exemplified by how the two side guards hug the corner with a firm stance forward as to expect a situation. The ...


12

Addressing the link you cited, Tokugawa Ieyasu taking no part in fighting is not the same as opposing the war in general. In fact, Ieyasu was the one who proposed the invasion strategy that Hideyoshi adopted. When combat operations began, Tokugawa troops were part of the reserves who stayed in Kyushu. But, as you said, whether or not Ieyasu actually opposed ...


12

The question should be asked backwards: why did the US use tripwire deterrence in South Korea? Stationing troops in foreign soil should be considered unusual. In the case of tripwire deterrence, a nation deliberately places her troops in harm's way so that they are sacrificed when the host nation is attacked. The death of her own troops then creates a ...


9

In terms of recorded history, the earliest contact that I know was in 50 B.C., when a Japanese army supposedly aborted its invasion upon hearing of the Silla king's greatness. Make of its credibility what you will... 《三國史記·新羅本紀》八年,倭人行兵,欲犯邊,聞始祖有神德,乃還。 This is recorded in the History of the Three Kingdoms, written in A.D. 1145. The same document reports ...


9

1959, by a Belgian missionary named Ji Junghwan, who helped started domestic Korean cheese production at Imsil County. Cheese was introduced to South Korea in 1959 by a Belgian missionary, who came to Jeollabuk-do to help people surviving the Korean War. Lee, Cecilia Hae-Jin. "Keolla Do" Frommer's South Korea. 2nd ed. Vol. 775. Hoboken, NJ: Wiley,...


9

Related: It's worth noting the little (apparently) known fact that the Chinese and Vietnamese held Vietnam Warr part 3* between themselves after the end of part 2 with substantial losses on both sides. (*Part 1 - with France, part 2 with USA). Significant disgreements exist to the present and various "incidents" involving deaths on both sides (mainly ...


9

There were two reasons: 1) Economics and 2) Geography. The first was fairly obvious. Today, China is almost neck-and-neck with the U.S. as the world's largest economy, but in 1950, that was very different, with China then having only one-sixth of the U.S. GDP. The second is that China is right across the border (Yalu River) from North Korea, while the U.S. ...


8

The reason is simple: those were the allocated quotas[3]. The apparent contradiction observed in the question stems form the fact that Japan was not as politically united as is often assumed. The recruitment of "volunteers" was carried out by the colonial administration of Korea, where there was significant support for the idea. Aside from some Koreans who ...


5

Korea King Jumong, who founded the Korean kingdom of Goguryeo, was the son of Hae Mo-su of Buyeo who was reputed to be a "son of Heaven". Later, Goguryeo's spiritual successor state of Goryeo styled their rulers "son of heaven", but only internally. Externally, or specifically when dealing with China, the Goryeo monarchs styled themselves merely kings. ...


5

So finally, after all google searches failed, I had to search manually and now I must admint that the information is available even in english. A: The first screen door system was installed on 4. November 2005 at Sadang Station. Source: Seoul metro official site


5

The short answer is because they were still at war. Further, it is not clear to me why you would say "... the Japanese had no hopes of invading Korea again". This final battle is from Hideyoshi's 2nd invasion of Korea in late 16th century. The longer answer is, and putting this question in context, it wasn't a retreat or surrender but a fighting ...


5

Because it was decided that the two teams would compete separately. Originally, there were hopes for the two teams to not only march as one in the 2008 Olympics, but to compete as a single entity, a 'Korea' team. However, negotiations failed, and the two teams ended up marching separately as a result. Since then, there have been several diplomatic ...


4

To expand on Amandeep Jiddewar's answer: The Wikipedia article on Noryang referenced by OP seems to indicate that the Japanese were not intending a retreat from the Korean Peninsula, but rather a consolidation inside their fortified perimeter around Pusan. As one of the most vulnerable maneuvers that an army can attempt is a withdrawal in the face of the ...


4

Before I begin to answer your question a little information is required to set the appropriate background of discussion. In 1259 the Koreans, the Goreyo at the time, capitulated to the Mongolian forces and signed a treaty making Korea a vassel of the Mongol horde than led by Möngke Khan. Subsequently in 1260 Kublai Khan comes to power inheriting his fathers ...


4

This is my idea how this happen. Japan during the Meiji Era started the modernization of Japan and started copying everything western. I believe even the sailor suit used by school children was copied from Britain. As for the bell chime, it seems it was started only near 1950s. According to this site (In Japanese), after WW2 around the 1950s, the school ...


3

It is always difficult to answer the question "why"? It is a combination of many reasons. Perhaps some reasons can be unveiled by comparison. It seems that "good government" is very important for prosperity of a nation. Compare S Korea with N Korea: same people by the way. I do not know the whole history of Korea very well, but I suppose there was no ...


3

Soviet-Chinese relations were at the lowest point at the time of Vietnam war. Even if the Vietnamese government wanted to get full support from the two sides, they would have to choose. And for many years since then the Soviet Union and Vietnam were allies not only against the US but against China too. A strong Vietnam was the reason for China's failure in ...


3

A few days ago I read a very long article about modernization of Korea, but it is in Portuguese. A summary: The Japanese occupation not played a significant role. Most of Japanese industries was in the north and Korea was always a annex, supping goods for Japan, so not have complete productive chains. Korea received a lot of free money from USA because of ...


3

Hideyoshi's predecessor, Oda Nobunaga, ruled mainly through fear and intimidation. Hideyoshi had a more benign approach. When conquering Shikoku and Kyushsu he let the local daimyo keep their holding provided they swore him loyalty. Hence, there were no spoils of war to divide among his retainers to the same extent that Nobunaga was able to. Megalomania is ...


3

Simply, the Koreans wanted to bloody the Japanese so the Japanese wouldn't be tempted to re-invade again. The Chinese treated the Koreans as the junior partner in the war, and felt free to ignore Korean concerns during negotiations. The Chinese wanted a stable situation on the Korean peninsula, so they could withdraw from an expensive endeavor, and free ...


3

The website of the Japanese Ministry of Foreign Affairs has the text of General Order No. 1, as issued on 2 September 1945, in both English and Japanese. The English text states: (b) The senior Japanese Commanders and all ground, sea, air and auxiliary forces within Manchuria, Korea North of 38 degrees North latitude, Karafuto, and the Kurile Islands, ...


2

Before China was unified there was a warrior class(mostly noblemen), until the warlords realized that they could hire peasants with a cheap price and give them cheap weapons to expand their army. After that, most noblemen became scholars or military commanders, because of the change in the tactics of warfare(the ceasing of chariot warfare and agreed warfare,...


2

Korea had a Yangban class which might be compared with samurai status but was closer to the Chinese scholarly ruling class. Most historians hold that the scholar class achieved power in China (or Chinese dynasties of whatever race, except perhaps the Mongol Yuan one) while the warrior class gained power in Japan. During the late 17th, 18th and early 19th ...


2

To Semaphore's excellent answer I would just add that Hideyoshi was already showing signs of declining health. Ieyasu's Japanese nickname can be translated as "cunning badger" and he is known for patience and long term outlook. Thus, it is likely that he envisioned ambitious Western daimyo returning with battle fatigued troops and a physically (and ...


2

He stayed out because he was saving his strength for taking over Japan. Right after the Korean war finished he staged a coup and took control from Hideyoshi's government. Source: http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Battle_of_Sekigahara


2

Japan has spent over a century in constant fighting when Hideyoshi unified the country. Typically Japanese conquerors take land from the defeated and reward their own followers. But with all of Japan conquered, there wasn't any new land to give away. Conquering Korea solves both problems. Unfortunately for Hideyoshi, the invasion failed.


2

I knew nothing about him before reading the Wikipedia article on him five minutes ago, so hopefully someone will come up with a more informed answer. According to Wiki: Hideyoshi's health beginning to falter, but still yearning for some accomplishment to solidify his legacy, he adopted Oda Nobunaga's dream of a Japanese conquest of China and launched ...


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