38

The Korean War and the Vietnam War are fundamentally very different conflicts. With the former, South Korea was unambiguously invaded by North Korea in an explicit war of conquest. Due to lucky political circumstances, United Nations was able to sanction a military operation to defend South Korea. The Security Council, Having determined that the ...


25

It happened too quickly. The North Koreans invaded at dawn on June 25th 1950, which is the middle of the afternoon June 24th at UN HQ in NYC. Within 5 hours news agencies had picked it up. 24 hours after the invasion, resolution 82 was introduced and passed. Security Council Resolution 82 demanded hostilities end, and the North Koreans withdraw. Two days ...


18

The USSR boycott wasn't simply a bout of pointless petulance. It was likely felt in the USSR that any action from the Security Council required their concurrence whether or not they were there for the vote, and thus their boycott would prevent anything from getting done (eventually forcing acceptance of their position on the China issue). The veto power ...


18

First of all, armistice was supposed to be a temporary measure on the way to an actual peace treaty, it was not expected to last as long as it did. But at the moment of its proposal it was not accepted by South Korea - or by North Korea, for that matter. In fact, USA officials first started talking about peaceful resolution in December 1950, after China's ...


17

Based on the persistent comments by Hans, this new OP seems really keen to get an answer. So I will try. But I have a qualifier, and that is I'm not really that interested in rehashing political debates (which it could turn into, very quickly) on the Korean war. I'd rather delete this answer if that's the case. Let's start with a timeline (Jun 25, 1950 – ...


17

Let me add a few details to Semaphore's answer. One is that the Vietnam war actually ended with the North Vietnam invasion of South Vietnam. This happened soon after the US withdrawal, and in violation of the peace treaty. The UN Security Council could not react properly because the Soviets had the right of veto in it. (As it could not react in 2014 on the ...


13

Firstly, the South Korean soldiers are far more concerned about escalating possible situation. This is exemplified by how they are strict about making contact due to possible unwanted attention, hence the sunglasses on the SK soldiers. This is also exemplified by how the two side guards hug the corner with a firm stance forward as to expect a situation. The ...


12

Frankly, Korea's history has been so defined by external powers that it would be difficult to imagine what things would have been like without them. You are getting seriously into realms of speculative history. For the most part, the reason people band together into large states or countries is so that they can deal with other such large entities. So it is ...


10

It's pertinent to note that several nations other than the U.S. participated in combat on the side of South Vietnam, with the largest contributions coming from South Korea, Thailand, and Australia. Many others gave civilian or military aid. South Korea deployed 50,000 soldiers over the course of the war, which is more than all the countries in the Korean War ...


9

I don't think you can describe it as "get[ting] rid of" former Nationalist troops. However, there is some truth to the basic idea that Nationalist soldiers fought in Korea. Since soldiers had to obey the chain of command, to some extent you may describe that as being "forced to fight", as well The best example is the PLA 50th Army, which used to be the NRA ...


8

tl; dr There is some evidence to show that the message was, in fact, sent during that engagement, but it seems unlikely that it was the USS Buck that sent it. It seems more likely to have been the USS Duncan (DDR-874). Eyewitness account There is a Facebook group dedicated to the USS Wisconsin (BB-64). This picture of the damage sustained by USS ...


7

Question: The reason for the stalemate of the korean war. . Short Answer: The United Nations forces did not enjoy overwhelming Military Advantages in the Korean War. The UN forces had no answer for the Soviet T-34(medium tank) initially in the Korean war. US Army War College: The Armor Debacle in Korea, 1950: ...


5

Yes, the People's Liberation Army (PLA) included many Nationalist POWs including a whole Nationalist army. The People's Volunteer Army which attacked Korea was made up of PLA units. However, I find no evidence they were considered disposable. According to The Chinese Communist Army in Action: The Korean War and Its Aftermath by Alexander L. George on page ...


4

Actually , given the dire situation in Korea when the US entered the war, with only a shrinking beachhead around Pusan left in South Korean hands, I venture that the US did win the Korean War. We are misled by the hopes that MacArthur engendered with his amazing landing at Inchon. Unfortunately MacArthur's complete mismanagement of both supplies and his ...


3

What does win mean? Did you achieve what you originally aimed to do? Then maybe U.S. and allied forces did "Win" as they achieved the mandate of Security Council Resolution 84 to "furnish such assistance to the Republic of Korea as may be necessary to repel the attack". References 1. UN Security Council, Resolution 84 (1950) of 7 July 1950, 7 July 1950, ...


2

In World War II, the United States had the assistance of the Soviet Union and China, countries with two of the largest armies in the world, that tied down large numbers of Axis troops while the U.S. administered the coup de grace. In Korea, the United States was fighting both China and the Soviet Union, the former, "officially," the latter, tacitly, who ...


2

The only source I have found prior to the Reddit post is this page on MilitaryHistoryNow which was published in August, 2018 in conjunction with the release of Amy Waters Yarsinske's book USS Wisconsin: The Last Battleship. I suspect the real answer will be found in Ms. Yarsinske's book or its bibliography. The site contains the text Following the ...


2

No. Gary Sinise has done over 100 USO tours. According to an article at USO.org dated April 18, 2017, Gary Sinise & Lt. Dan Band Performance Marks Actor's 97th USO Tour A later article,just last month(Mar 27, 2019), also at USO, says Today, Sinise will perform his 100th USO Tour in Virginia Beach, Virginia, and we’d like to salute his service ...


2

This is a very basic and straight-forward question which can be answered by looking at the first few paragraphs on wikipedia. Since I'm not sure of the specifics the basic outline I've written below. [It] was a product of the Cold War between United States and the Soviet Union. Korea had been split into two sovereign nations. Both governments claimed to ...


2

Given the history of European and Russian intervention in Chinese affairs ( e.g. the Boxer Rebellion, Sino-Russian border disputes and foreign mercenaries involved in the suppression of the Taiping Uprising) it does seem surprising that there was not more international involvement in the Chinese Civil War. There was even a precedent for intervention ...


1

Here's my stab at it, coming from just reading This Kind of War* by Fehrenbach. (Apologies: my first read on the Korean War. However, the Cold War is my favorite historical period, along with asymmetric warfare). Past the initial mad yo-yo-ing the 2 other answers have provided maps for, Truman understood that this was a sideshow . "Domino Theory" dates ...


1

The evidence is covered in the notes at the end of the book if memory serves me well. In this specific case, you'll find one or more references to Edgar Schein's work. (I'm not 100% sure this is the precise reference Cialdini gives in his book, as I gave away my own copy, but you'll most definitely find references at the end of the book to precise literature ...


1

The question asks about General MacArthur's decision to cross the 38th parallel thus 'invading North Korea'. The answer to that question is that General MacArthur, heading a U.N force tasked with repelling North Korean aggression, saw that South Korean people were deeply divided and the US supported regime was corrupt, contained collaborators, and was ...


1

After reading Anwar's answer I did some more research and can confirm parts of his answer and since @Congusbongus said Anwar's answer seems entirely speculative I would like to add to it. Why do the South Koreans stand the way they do? The ROK soldiers stand in a Taekwondo fighting stance to react to anything that may happen. In fact all ROK soldiers are ...


1

It appears that was killed in a napalm strike by U.S. forces, although there is at least a slight possibility that the responsible aircrafts was South African. By then four US bombers had flown past the village where the headquaters was located. People thought the bombers went to bomb the Yalu River bridge. Mao Anying and the soldier went into the ...


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