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14 votes
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Where in the sources does it say that Syagrius claimed to be "merely governing a Roman province"?

I'd say more likely an uncareful phrasing, rooted in a desire to not lavish too many words on side detail. Romans didn't have kings. They had an emperor, and people administering territories and/or ...
T.E.D.'s user avatar
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13 votes
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What does this quote from the Roman imperial poet Rutilius mean?

Rutilius was referring to monks, whom he strongly disapproved of because of their ascetic lifestyle. At the time (late antiquity), the abandonment of wealth and family for an ascetic lifestyle was ...
Lars Bosteen's user avatar
12 votes
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Is the following claim concerning the loss of classical Latin literature substantiated?

It's hard to see how this claim could be substantiated given that we don't know how much existed in the first place. In a 2013 article Lost writings of Latin literature, Peter Knox (Professor of ...
Lars Bosteen's user avatar
5 votes

Where in the sources does it say that Syagrius claimed to be "merely governing a Roman province"?

To make a long answer short: Nobody knows what title(s) Syagrius actually used. Part One (of Ten): Imperial titles. I note that Greek texts tended to refer to the Roman Emperor as Basileus, which ...
MAGolding's user avatar
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5 votes
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How did agricultural productivity change in Italy with the fall of the Roman Empire and through the early Middle Ages?

Agricultural output went down during the early middle ages in Italy. According to data from Maddison database, Italy GDP per capita was 805 on year 1, while it was 450 on year 1000. Population went ...
Santiago's user avatar
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4 votes

How did agricultural productivity change in Italy with the fall of the Roman Empire and through the early Middle Ages?

tl;dr Productivity did not change much in late antique Italy. Small decreases through disruptions occurred locally and repeatedly, but small increases in techniques and efficiency can also be observed....
LаngLаngС's user avatar
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3 votes
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What office or status did these individuals hold in Roman-Britain based on their attire?

I am fairly certain the person described is a lictor: one in the back wearing a white garment, with possibly a purple strap over his shoulder, carrying a black & white staff with a knobbed end ...
Jos's user avatar
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2 votes

Did the Roman government attempt to hide the collapse of the empire?

Let me answer at least one part of the question, on presence of Roman forces in early 5th century Britain. Before that, however, my recommendation is not to use the Notitia Dignitatum for anything ...
J Asia's user avatar
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2 votes

How many Western Roman rump states were there?

There were several Berber/Roman rump states in North Africa. One was the Mauro-Roman Kingdom in North Africa from about 429-578. In one inscription King Masuna described himself as Rex gentium ...
MAGolding's user avatar
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2 votes

What office or status did these individuals hold in Roman-Britain based on their attire?

There is really not much to discern exactly and directly, and unequivocally from the picture as present(ed). That we would see any lictores can be firmly excluded, however, as definitive attributes ...
LаngLаngС's user avatar
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1 vote

Where in the sources does it say that Syagrius claimed to be "merely governing a Roman province"?

@MAGolding is mostly right in his answer -- especially the part that we don't know what title Syagrius used for himself -- but we can be fairly confident there was one he did not use -- emperor. ...
llywrch's user avatar
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1 vote

How many Western Roman rump states were there?

The last such rump to fall would appear to be what became Wessex, with the defeat and death of a British king named Natanleod by the Saxons Cerdic and Cynric, in 519 CE. At some point one must draw ...
Pieter Geerkens's user avatar

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