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Romania was the ancient Roman province of Dacia. Under Roman rule, the province was systematically colonised and developed. It has been theorised that these Roman settlers, intermingling with Romanised native Dacians, become the ancestors of the modern Romanian people. Under this theory, the Romanians inherited a Romance language derived from Vulgar Latin. ...


22

You neglect the fact that the 'indigenous' population of France before the Great Migrations (of mainly Germanic tribes) was Gallo-Roman, and by the end of the Roman era (5th century AD), the populace spoke a dialect of Vulgar Latin, which evolved into a distinct "Gallic" Latin over the following centuries. Note however that the ancient Celtic (Gaulish) ...


19

Ancient Romans used the word Aethiops/Aethiopem which was derived from Greek Αἰθίοψ ‎(Aithíops). But the other answer isn't right when it says that the word Aithiops had no meaning except for the land of "Ethiopia". Instead, the word is a combination created from αἴθω ‎(aíthō, “burn”) + ὤψ ‎(ṓps, “face”). So the Greco-Roman word for the blacks was ...


18

(Note that there are definitively many traces of Germanic influence on Spanish/Portuguese. For example, as @AlbertYago's pointed out, the Iberian vocabulary contains several Germanic imports; Wikipedia even has a section on this subject. Nonetheless, the underlying question is valid: the Germanic influence is obviously way, way weaker in Iberia than it is in ...


15

In addition to the excellent answer by Semaphore, there are some details about why Romania kept a much stronger character of the Latin culture and language, compared with surrounding countries. The influence of the French Revolution ( 1789 - 1799) was felt all across Europe. At the time, the territory of the modern Romania, while populated by people of same ...


11

It is, perhaps easier to understand when compared with a map: image source Wikimedia CC BY-SA 4.0 Now, Caesar's meaning should be a little more clear. When he says: "The Belgae rises from the extreme frontier of Gaul, extend to the lower part of the river Rhine; and look toward the north and the rising sun" We can see that the territory of the Belgae ...


10

1995 = MCMXCV. The rules are: first triad: I, V, and X: I, II, III, IV, V, VI, VII, VIII, IX, X Then all is repeated with: second triad: X, L, and C third triad: C, D, and M You can't use letters outside of their "triad": So, IM for 999 is wrong. CXC for 190 is correct, and 195 is CXCV (not CVC). You should write numbers in decreasing order: ...


9

Disclaimer: I am not a historian, however I do have a passion for history, and have researched some of the theories regarding the origins of my language and culture. If my answer doesn't meet H SE standards please let me know and I'll try and improve it (it's my first post) I noticed this question in the HNQ list and joined the site simply so I could get my ...


8

There were two Roman provinces that encompassed part of modern Bavaria: Raetia and Noricum. In both the ancient population primarily were herders and loggers, not farmers. So they weren't particularly populous provinces. Both were essentially overrun by Germanics during the Migration period. These "Germanics" were primarily speaking either West Germanic ...


8

This question has no definite answer because there was no alternative. In the period between 17th and 19th century all science everywhere in Europe switched from the Latin to the native languages. This process was inevitable with the raise of nation-states. The argument that you cite is not valid, because before that time all educated people learned Latin. ...


6

In my earlier answers on similar questions, What are some examples of racism in pre-modern literature? How did people categorize each other in the middle ages, how did racism work? I expressed the opinion that neither Romans nor Greeks nor Jews (of the time when the Bible was written) had words to designate races. Race is a modern invention. I challenged ...


6

As backup for Noldorin's point, note that the (French-speaking) Normans conqured England in 1066 and made French the country's official language for centuries. This didn't really change the fact that the vast majority of Englishmen spoke only English, and still do (although with a lot of French loan-words for things mostly of concern to the upper-classes). ...


6

The list can be found in the original Latin on page 68 of this edition of the Ystoria Mongolarum, about 1/3 of the way down the page. On Page 269 (through 295) are C. Raymond Beazley's Notes on Hakluyt's Version of Vincent of Beauvis' Abridgement of Carpini, discussing the text. On Page 278 at the top we have a discussion of India magna (noting that ...


3

The French wikipedia page about the dictionary names two Latin authors who kind of wrote dictionaries, Varro and Verrius Flaccus. Then with the Christian era and the rise of the codex (book) and its religious use, you see a lot more, including the onomasticon (a kind of thesaurus) and a Latin-Greek dictionary in the 5th century. But classification didn't go ...


3

Wikipedia has separate articles on the different ranks, but they are not (as of this writing) systematically categorized. For example: Illustris or Gloriosissimus. The Illustris article refers to Jones, A.H.M., The Later Roman Empire 284-602, A Social, Economic, and Administrative Survey (Oxford: Blackwell, 1964, repr. Johns Hopkins UP, 1986) which is a ...


3

The Roman numeral system was "designed" for calculating using an abacus. One wrote out the number by the values of each channel (we picture an abacus as a wood frame with wires holding columns of beads for counters but the Romans would usually have used a table, a "TV-tray" if you will, covered with ample sand, running a finger down for the lines, and ...


3

Bishop Asser tells the story of how as a child Alfred [the Great of England] won as a prize a book of Saxon poems, offered by his mother to the first of her children able to memorize it.[1] https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Alfred_the_Great#Childhood2 Following the example of Charlemagne, Alfred [the Great of England] established a court school for the ...


2

Anyone with an advanced education in either the secular or religious fields would know Latin. It was what most literature taught was written in, and all the religious texts.


2

Catholicism, whose liturgical language is Latin, is prevalent in Bavaria, so as long as there have been priests and parishioners there, Bavaria has had a population of Latin speakers, for example in the Seminarium Internationale Sancti Petri.


2

This is kind of a matter of opinion, but for what its worth, I don't think the change was particularly significant. First of all, it happened very gradually and during the time when most books were written in Latin, most anyone with even a basic education could read Latin. So, it was just not that big of a deal. I think part of the problem is that the ...


1

Nobody but nobody in Europe called themselves Romans Only Romanians and Romansh in Switzerland The Romanians/Vlachs came from South of Danube late in XII century That is in Valacia All the Lords of the Hungarians were Catholic Vlachs Also, some of the Hungarians (Contemorary) suggest that the Romanians/Vlachs called themselves "Romans" only because the ...


1

Keep in mind that Romania was part of the Roman empire (during the time of Trajan). Also Romanian language is of Latin descent (as Spanish, Portuguese, Italian and French), I guess that that could be part of the explanation.


1

Something too long for a comment, and perhaps deserving of more than the potentially-ephemeral state of "comments": First, specifically, in the late 1960s and through the 1970s, at least, for mathematics, a hugely significant fraction of important papers and textbooks were not in English. They were in French or German, and many things were in Russian, but ...


1

Newton and his contemporaries I think all had Latin. This is a primary effect of the education system of his and earlier times; math and physics were secondary in education. Even in Turing's time, his interest in math and chemistry was not apparently well regarded. He should have been spending more time on Latin and Greek, according to his instructors.


1

Can't cite a specific episode, but the British History podcast quotes several pre-Carolingian religious figures decrying the fact that nobody can understand the scriptures. At various points then Latin was as dead as it is now. I'm not sure it was a "conversational" language - it was the best option if you didn't share a common language. This is an ...


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