We’re rewarding the question askers & reputations are being recalculated! Read more.

Hot answers tagged

31

1400 A notable feature of this map is the English possession of Western France, which means that it's no later than 1453, when France took Bordeaux. Since in the Diplomacy game you color only the ownership of "supply centers" (represented by circles on the map, the larger industrial/population centres) this is consistent with France owning Paris, Rouen and ...


22

They identify the size of the formation. That Free French unit you referred to with one X is actually a brigade, not a division. Similarly, the Greek and German unit facing each other German unit both have a single X, and has been explicitly labelled as brigades. All other units, including the Italian one you mentioned, have XX - indicating they are ...


21

The Prime Meridian we use now was the one the British chose, since it went through Greenwich Observatory near London. France had their own where Paris was 0 degrees, the US had one. When the situation of each nation having its own longitude got too annoying, they picked one. England's won out because of 2 factors: 1) England was the largest power at the ...


18

There is a German Wikipedia entry for it, but I found no entry for this specific 'Schwedenschanze'. It is a military sconce (fortification) (German: Schanze) or Hill fort, the name is based on the Thirty Years' War. Sweden (German: Schweden) was a participant during the war. It is not necessary, that the Schwedenschanze you found is a real Swedish sconce. ...


16

This map is not historically accurate. For example there is an entity called "Prussia" and an entity called "Novgorod", while in reality they never existed at the same time. It's a mixture of maybe 1500ish plus minus 200 years and a lot of artistic freedom.


15

Your question assumes that some kind of a formal decision was made and that most countries explicitly agree that there is an official demarcation. As this boundary is mostly cartographical, no country has ever, to the best of my knowledge, made an issue out of this location. It's been the practice to just use whatever demarcation that other cartographers ...


15

The convention was established by Ptolemy (AD 90 – c. AD 168) in his main work, Geography. The following is a 15th century reconstruction of Ptolemy's world map: It's an arbitrary decision, and several reversed maps exist. There are also maps that don't follow a standard orientation, some examples are T and O maps, polar maps, and Dymaxion/Fuller maps. ...


14

This is a rough translation (work in progress). Notice that the text is rhymed, and some of it (I find ) it is illegible. 2 Norway and Sweden \\ Loving to make progress these nations both \\ they advance in the art of lazy bones 3 Finland \\ Even among bears the priestly tail \\ Attempts to place herself and summon factions \\ But only those ...


14

The first satellite image of Earth was taken in 1959. At that time, as far as I can tell, aerial photography and stereoplotters were used to produce topographic maps with accuracy that I imagine would have depended mostly on the quality of the aerial photographs, but probably down to a few meters. For larger maps depicting the Earth, I think the answer ...


14

Realistically speaking a reasonably knowledgeable Japanese person would've been able to spot Japan on a world map, based on the islands' relative position to Korea and China. This is probably true since at least the 400s. They were, after all, able to engage in extensive trade and diplomacy with the mainland. Their grasp of geography couldn't be that far off ...


14

There are some atlases for 1890 or thereabouts on the internet archive. This one here is exactly 1890. The world-wide atlas of modern geography, political and physical, containing one hundred and twelve plates and complete index [cartographic material] There are plenty of others at this link (but not necessarily 1890). https://archive.org/details/...


13

The book "Longitude" discusses this, and says the international standardization of the prime meridian arose mainly due to the publication of practical astronomical tables which used the Greenwich meridian. As ships started using these tables for navigation (as opposed to dead reckoning), they naturally switched to using the Greenwich meridian if they hadn't ...


12

The Romans were good surveyors. Vitruvius described surveying tools and methods in a book that was still used in the Middle Ages, hundreds of years after it was written. By laying out stakes at fixed distances and using a plumb with simple sighting rods, it is very easy to lay out squares, lines, triangles, etc., and to measure the distances between ...


12

One example would seem to be the 1867 treaty by which the United States purchased Alaska from Russia. The issues that arose are described Michael Byers and James Baker by in their book International Law and the Arctic. The border between the two countries was to be in the Bering Sea and Bering Strait. However, as Byers and Baker observe: ... the 1867 ...


11

The first thing I can think of is Portolan charts, the Wikipedia page is not very clear but it links here which has some more information. (full frameset for the second link) The lines themselves (Contemporaneously called rhumblines, but that term has since been redefined for modern usage.) are today termed windrose (or bearing) lines: lines of constant (...


11

The maps were almost as accurate as they are after the launch of satellites. And this has little to do with air photography. And celestial navigation ("sextants" hinted in the previous message) was responsible only for mapping of remote islands. The main method of making accurate maps was geodesic survey. One begins with laying a base, that is measure ...


11

http://omniatlas.com/maps/eastasia/19450815/ has a map that shows the Empire of Japan. It was very big even during the surrender.


10

Euratlas.net is by far the best map website, it has maps from 1AD to 2000AD. For European maps click here and for general maps click here.


10

Some maps from some UK universities can be found here.


10

General answer: it will probably depend what you define as "the shape". Ultimately, once landfall was made on opposite coasts (1820-1840), and land was proven to be there, it was a matter of looking at all the places a ship had sailed through without hitting anything, concluding that the coastline must be further south than that, and drawing in a dotted line ...


10

The date depends on whether one is referring to date of completion or date of printing. The map was completed by April 1750 but the 1st edition was not printed until June 1752. The earliest public presentation of the map would appear to be the 8th of April 1750 when it was presented to the Academie des Sciences in Paris. Arader Galleries says: BAUCHE, ...


9

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/History_of_cartography has a very good description. Ptolemy suggested mapping a spherical earth with lines of longitude/latitude but didn't do very much field work. There are Arabic maps from C9-C10 which used astronomical observations to get their important cities in the right place. The maps from 1500 are essentially ...


9

"Europe" can mean different things depending on context. To geologists, there is no such thing as a distinct European land-mass since it is inseparable from Asia (hence Eurasia). Politically, Europe might mean the member states of the EU or the EEC. In sporting terms, Israel and Kazakhstan are in Europe. According to Turkey, country is entirely in Europe, ...


9

The technology to determine the narrowest point in northern England is as nothing compared to that necessary for supplying Roman towns with running water and baths, as with the Nimes Aqueduct in Southern France, shown here at the Pont du Gard crossing of Gardon River. The Fontaine d'Eure, at 76 m (249 ft) above sea level, is only 17 m (56 ft) higher than ...


9

Treaty of Tordesillas defined a division of new lands between Spain and Portugal along a meridian 370 leagues west of the Cape Verde islands. Since it was so difficult to define where that meridian was, some Portuguese maps declared that the territory of present Uruguay was under their influence, even though the territory was in Spain's lands. As result, ...


8

Here's a zoomed-in screenshot of a map I made using Harvard's Geospatial Library. As you can see in the left, the layer I chose was "Germany State Boundaries, 1914." The little exclave in the bottom center of the screen is Achberg. If you zoom in a little more, it is labeled, but I chose to stay a little further out so you could see the other exclaves. It's ...


8

There's an article here with details and reconstruction pictures like this one. Most of the site is small houses and you can see from photos many have not been reconstructed but there is still a lot that was done. A New York Times article on Mohenjo Daro says Much of the area has been reconstructed with newly made bricks, which preserves the look and ...


7

I realise I am very late in answering this, but I cannot stress this enough: the best source by far for historical maps that I have ever found, is David Rumseys amazing online collections I would also like to point you in the direction of this book; Cartographies of Time though it might be more time-space related than what you are looking for.


7

Here are some sites that I like: • Historical maps, University of Texas (more to come)


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible