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89

I’ll throw in a vote for Robert “Romeo” Coates, a theatre actor in Britain in the early 1800s. According to Wikipedia (emphasis mine): Despite this ridicule, Coates went on to tour the British Isles. If a theatre manager would hesitate to let him show his talents, he would bribe them. Managers, in turn, often called in the police in case things went ...


61

The poet William McGonagall (born March 1825 and died 29 September 1902) is a famous example. McGonagall has been lampooned as the worst poet in British history. The chief criticisms are that he is deaf to poetic metaphor and unable to scan correctly. His only apparent understanding of poetry was his belief that it needed to rhyme. McGonagall's fame stems ...


48

Florence Foster Jenkins, known as the world's worst opera singer. "No one, before or since, has succeeded in liberating themselves quite so completely from the shackles of musical notation." Despite (or perhaps because of) her technical incompetence, she became a prominent musical cult figure in New York City during the 1920s, 1930s, and 1940s. At ...


24

English As She Is Spoke was so bad it was enjoyable: English As She Is Spoke is the common name of a 19th-century book written by Pedro Carolino, and falsely additionally credited to José da Fonseca, which was intended as a Portuguese–English conversational guide or phrase book, but is regarded as a classic source of unintentional humour, as the given ...


15

Adios is Spanish for Farewell or Goodbye. This is a cloned poster made in Argentina of the movie, from the Bruceploitation movement of the 1970's, Goodbye Bruce Lee: His Last Game of Death. This movie is actually a cloned version of the original movie Game of Death. It was released in 1975, two years after Bruce Lee's death. And starred Bruce Li (Don't ...


13

On November 23rd, 1938, the Arizona Republic was one of several papers to carry this stark headline: Source: Newspapers.com On November 6th, 1939, on page 7 of the New York Times, under a headline 'Jews said to face famine in Poland' it was reported that About 1,500,000 Jews remaining in that area are condemned to starvation. Just over a year later, ...


11

In the late part of 1858, Count Charles Montalembert of France was put on trial and prosecuted by the French government for writing an article titled "A Debate on India in the English Parliament". The French government took the position that certain passages of this article were "seditious and an outrage upon the existing Government" of France. (This link ...


11

It wasn't just the newsreels. The ultra-fast talking high-pitched (and almost rhythmic) voice was actually common in media of that era. For example, here's the final scene from Casablanca in 1942. By modern standards, it sounds like a lot of bursts of rapid-fire dialog, interspersed by pauses for you to mentally catch your breath and process what you just ...


11

For the most part, the telephone was a welcome invention that, aside from its practical applications for business, helped to alleviate the loneliness of rural existence. It was adopted fairly quickly, reaching 40% of American households before the Depression hit, slowing and even reversing its use (22). Continued adoption would wait until the 1940s. Despite ...


10

The works of Amanda McKittrick Ros are an example of prose that was so bad it was considered entertaining for its badness. One group who entertained themselves with her work was a group of British literary greats known collectively as the Inklings (J. R. R. Tolkien and C. S. Lewis were among them). Their main business was to share unpublished works of ...


8

It varied from country to country. Deep inside the Soviet Union they could not watch Western TV and the only access was shortwave broadcasts. You could easily listen short-wave broadcasts in European languages. There were special broadcasts in Russian (Voice of America, Free Europe, German wave, BBC and few others). Very many people actually listened these ...


7

People in the German Democratic Republic could and did receive TV from the Federal Republic of Germany. Terrestrial reception of TV was limited in some parts of the GDR, notably the Dresden area. In the last years of the GDR there were even cases where Westfernsehen (western television) was provided by local cable providers. Obviously those were the regular ...


6

World War II was in many respects a "continuation" war of World War I, from which there were a lot of "unfinished" business. World War II brought "closure" to many of these things. Consider the following: 1, Yes, tanks planes, submarines, and other weapons were developed during World War I,but it wasn't until World War II that people realized how ...


6

As far as the modern "mass" media goes this indeed was started after the invention of the printing press like @jfrankcarr pointed out. But Propaganda has been around since the dawn of human civilization. Even in Prehistoric times there were symbols which could be argued as being propaganda, signs of success or fertility: Venus figurines are a good example ...


5

Its a truism, at least in the Lockian conception of government that any system of government that doesn't allow the governed a legal way to remove leaders that have become unacceptable (for whatever reason), in the long run guarantees itself extra-legal government change. All things end, and if there's no peaceful way to end a government, its end will not be ...


5

In 1900 Hufvudstadsbladet (Swedish language newspaper in Finland) had a circulation of 17,500, putting it far ahead of the nearest Finnish language rival, Uusi Soumetar at 11,300.(Conflict and Compromise in Multilingual Societies: Finland, Volym 3) But Swedish is one of the two national languages of Finland so it may not count.


5

The following snippets are from two articles that describe what role the media may have had in the outcome of the "Arab Spring" So, Was Facebook Responsible for the Arab Spring After All? ... Pollock's portrayal of Egyption activism displays strategies and tools similar to Tunisia's. Of course, that's no accident: The Egyptian activists were ...


4

Right from the start in the 1450's the Gutenberg printing press was used to influence people. Not only was the Bible printed but indulgences were printed out in considerable numbers as well. Classical writings, such as Greek philosophers, were also distributed. Within 10 years of the invention of the printing press, it was being used to deliver religious and ...


4

New media has often been met with criticism - Semaphore rightfully pointed out that often not the medium but the topic (sex, violence, drugs, blasphemy, ...) is condemned. Still there are example where this wasn't the case. Probably the most clear cut example is from Socrates There is an old Egyptian tale of Theuth, the inventor of writing, showing his ...


4

This is only an extended comment. One (possibly unsatisfactory) reason is that WWII happened after WWI, and so the interwar period is now seen as a period of 20 years that led to an even greater conflict. Had WWII not happened, WWI would have been seen as a watershed event, one that led to the fall of Four great empires (Russia, Austria-Hungary, Germany and ...


4

Until early 1871, when cable communication between Singapore and London was first established, it would take quite a while for information to travel between the two locations. Suez shortened the trip abruptly beginning in 1869, and there were many improvements to travel speeds throughout the century, but it was always measured in weeks. That pretty much ...


4

The two are not at all comparable IMO. Before the civil war, members of US Congress were literally engaging in pugilism, with occasional duels, and did so chiefly over slavery. Moods calmed down, and more or less stayed calm, after the Civil War. The disagreements between the pro- and anti-slave camps were public and vivid, and the Civil War could ...


4

This is a matter of taste. And "so bad, it's good" is an 'acquired taste'. As a more or less mass phenomenon it is indeed a recent one, although slightly older thatn the question presumes. Tastes differ. Tastes develop. And not all people have the same opinion on what's good, and certainly not all at the same time. It's also quite the difference to see an ...


3

I think no one mentioned: In western Europe TV channels were in PAL system, while Eastern Europe mostly adopted a version of SECAM. There were differences in the audio system, too. From late 80s, satellite programs also became available in Eastern Europe. All you needed a satellite antenna, and you could watch MTV Europe, sky channel, etc, but years before ...


3

Our understanding of the composition and redaction of biblical texts has developed enormously over the course of the 20th century alone - let alone since the days in which Isaac Newton published his Observations! The ascription to Ezra of the editing process (while not an invention of Newton's) reflects on a general tendency to ascribe authorship to ...


3

Cultural art forms such as group dances, ballets, individual performances where artistes sang of historical or mythological or contemporary heroics existed for a very long time in India. An early reference one can find for this kind of mass communication is that of Ramayana being sung by Lava kusa who toured cities to sing the saga set to music. Similar art ...


2

Gaddafi spent Libyas oil millions on his own image, self importance, family and military whilst his population were suppressed, imprisoned, tortured and left to starve. I don't think the West's view of Gaddafi is distorted at all. Whether it was right for the West to interfere in a country that was not their concern is a different issue and question.


2

I think in Russia we had little knowledge about Libya and Gaddafi before this war. Some people remember that he was a Soviet ally in 1970s and also that he was accused in supporting terrorism. Our impression of him as a dictator stems mostly from his pompous uniform which is stereotypical for dictators (i.e. some guy in a gold-knitted uniform->he is, ...


2

The media has been criticized for casting an inaccurate view of the recent tensions. The problem is that it's portrayed as a recent upheavel, something that the people in the region have seemingly just woken up to. In fact, many of those in the hotspot areas leading revolts have stated that the struggles have been ongoing for years, if not decades, and only ...


2

Drennon's answer is incorrect. Montalembert's writings had nothing to do with Tyrannicide. John Stuart Mill's reference is to two trials that took place back-to-back in England in 1858. Paraphrasing from the legal accounts: Queen versus Truelove. Indictment found at the Central Criminal Court and removed into the Court of Queen's Bench by certiorari, ...


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