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5

First of all the disclaimer: all but a bit of general knowledge I have about gout is from looking through a bunch of papers as the question triggered my curiosity. So please the following with the appropriate caution, and take this more as points to start thoughts than as ready-made answer. Some background: From Doherty: New insights into the ...


2

It is indeed a bit difficult to really ascertain the incidence and prevalence rates in medieval or ancient times. Wile the lives of rich people may be documented quite well, those supposedly not suffering as often poorer people left much fewer traces in the literature. Looking at it from the top: indeed, of 86 Byzantine emperors, 14 did suffer from ...


10

There's a few different things going on here. First, to get it out of the way, we've known that gout was linked to lifestyle since the beginning of medicine. No less a person than Hippocrates made this connection: Hippocrates also noted the link between the disease and an intemperate lifestyle, referring to podagra as an 'arthritis of the rich', as ...


8

Not made up from 'whole cloth' but copied from ancient papyrii? Many ancient cultures used molds, soil, and plants to treat bacterial infections. In Ancient Serbia, China and Greece, old moldy bread was pressed against wounds to prevent infection. In Egypt, crusts of moldy wheaten bread were applied on pustular scalp infections and “medicinal earth” was ...


6

Elaborating on the comment by Moishe Kohan, History of Penicilin -- Early History, emphasis mine: Many ancient cultures, including those in Egypt, Greece, and India, independently discovered the useful properties of fungi and plants in treating infection.[7] These treatments often worked because many organisms, including many species of mold, naturally ...


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