New answers tagged

1

Nicolo Machiavelli was a Modern era Philosopher. Machiavelli lived during the height of the Northern Italian Renaissance. Rene Descartes lived during the 1600's...about 200 plus years AFTER the end of the Middle Ages. Both Machiavelli and Descartes are widely considered to be the earliest Founders or Pioneers of Early Modern Philosophy-(and have no ...


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The pound was a unit of account in Anglo-Saxon England, equal to 240 silver pennies and equivalent to one pound weight of silver. So, 300 pounds, was 300 pounds (136kg) in silver


1

The Great Schism of 1054 was a very big deal, particularly with regard to major disagreements in Church Doctrine and institutional power. The main disagreement which led to a "Schism" between the Roman rite and Eastern rite Churches, was the concept of the Trinity. If my memory is correct, the Roman Catholic Church's position was (and is), that the ...


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Weights were not scientifically plausible until 600 years later. (Quote from www.precisa.co.uk/the-history-of-the-weighing-scales) Even Leonardo da Vinci failed to invent a reliable weights system. If scales were 99% accurate, on the third instance of weighing after the Royal standard, the error could be as much as 3%. Ancient pounds appear to be around 330 ...


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(Disclaimer: I am using very, very round numbers for my estimates.) The description of hundreds of pounds (ranging from 100 to 800) seems to come from some of the earliest surviving Robin Hood tales, printed in the early 1500s but probably based on earlier works. So the writer was probably not thinking of paper money but may have been more familiar with some ...


40

In that era, 300 pounds weighs 300 pounds, but it's a different pound. Your example of Robin Hood fixes the time period during the reign of King Richard about 1175, though we must remember this is a legend. This is just after the chaotic reign of King Stephen when the centralized minting of coins broke down. His successor, King Henry II, reintroduced the ...


0

It is almost impossible to know exactly how many textual works were compiled within Medieval Libraries; one can only offer speculations and theories, due to the lack of primary historical evidence. We know that Libraries did exist in Medieval Spain, both in Toledo, as well as Cordoba. Constantinople had its own imperial Library which stood for centuries, ...


0

I would like to add more information on the "urban centers under Muslim rule". While Al-Andalus was one of the more cosmopolitan civilizations of the Medieval era, there were other Muslim cities that shared a similar cosmopolitanism. Cities, such as Baghdad, Cairo and Fes, (and even some cities in Uzbekistan), were highly advanced in architecture,...


11

Sort of, but he was not recognized by all the electors, some of whom elected another candidate. I can find no evidence that he was ever confirmed as bishop by the Holy See. In short, it's complicated... Canon James of Tonengo, previously chaplain to Pope Urban IV (d.1264), was one of two Bishops of Vercelli elected by different factions of electors: James ...


2

Italian Wikipedia states Martino Avogadro di Quaregna † ( 1244 - deceased July 1268 ) Vacant See (1268-1273) Aimone di Challant † (21 December 1273 - 19 June 1303 died) But: The arch-diocese itself lists as bishop: Aimone di Challant (1268 – 19 giugno 1305)


4

Beverley Nank, who is a curator at the British Museum, says that snails in manuscripts were drawn to symbolize cowardice. She even analyzed the manuscript images posted above. Nenk said, 'snails were often depicted in the margins of medieval illuminated manuscripts, thought to symbolise cowardice. That could mean it is “a satirical reference to cowardly or ...


2

Simple answer: no. The premise of the question is flawed, probably in more than just one way. Danes did not sack Hamburg in 983, and Hamburg most probably wasn't destroyed in 983 at all by anyone. Short answer 880 third destruction of Hamburg, by Norman and Slavic raiders, led by Eric the Child 915 fourth destruction of Hamburg, by Danes and Slavs 1012 ...


1

The Events of 983 It appears likely that Hamburg was indeed burned and ravaged in 983 AD, but apparently not by the Danes, but by Slavic forces fighting a holy war against Christianity, according to the Medieval Elbe. The Medieval Elbe III 18: In those times, the church of Zeitz was captured and wasted by an army of Bohemians under the leadership of Dedi. ...


10

The book The Medieval Village, by George Coulton, has some information which seems to provide a basis for calculating an answer to your question. According to the first column of information, in the year 800 there were an estimated 100 Villages in this region. These contained an estimated 20,000 individuals, so we can calculate your average village size of ...


-3

Rather than try to argue fuzzy things like the meaning of "Medium Sized", how about I give you some stats? According to McEvedy's New Penguin Atlas of Medieval History, in AD 737 there were only 3 cities in Europe larger than 15,000: Toledo and Salonika (both in the 15-22k range), and Constantinople (in the 50-125K range). None of those cities were ...


27

Short Answer Saladin is believed to have spoken Kurdish, Turkish and Arabic. When communicating with crusaders, he needed an interpreter unless he was speaking to a crusader who knew Arabic (and there were certainly some who did - see examples below). I can find no evidence that he was conversant in any European language, though that does not mean to say ...


5

Although the title of your question refers specifically to the 12th century, your question asks for the High Middle Ages which is a longer period. As such, I will focus on the High Middle Ages of France. There are numerous examples of how succession might work during that time period thanks to the multitude of succession crises of France and Burgundy. ...


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