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2

This is really a chest. Which chest may be debatable, but it is a quite naughty allusion nonetheless, highlighting what Matthew thinks of Henry, and where he expects his priororities to have been. For once, Matthew was highly critical of Henry and constantly bemoaned any form of government. He seems to have disliked anything else 'the state' might do, ...


6

Some of this history is still controversial (namely, the actual location of Sarkel). Following is what I have extracted from the book S. Pletneva, "Essays on Khazar archeology," ("Очерки хазарской археологии") Jerusalem, 1999, that was written mostly on the basis of archeological excavations, namely, Artamonov's expedition (Artamonov was Pletneva's PhD ...


1

Sviatoslav I destroyed Sarkel. He built a settlement there called Bela Vezha, "white tower". This lasted until the Cumans, who then used it as a winter campground.


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Question: Were Jews cut off from the Babylonian Geonim? The Islamic Schism was a secondary reason for the waning influence of the Babylonian Geonim. The primary reason was economic, and is tied to the decline and troubles incurred by the city of Baghdad itself. History of Baghdad Baghdad's early meteoric growth slowed due to troubles within the ...


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The clue provided by Denis de Bernardy in a comment answers this question. Yes, the Grand Armorial de France of Henri Jougla de Morenas documents several noble families that predate 1066. As justCal points out, the volumes of this works are indexed on the French Wikipedia.


1

I may note that the purple lion is a sort of a heraldic pun, which is termed a canting coat of arms. https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Canting_arms1 https://www.heraldica.org/topics/canting.htm Many persons who adopted coats of arms designed them as puns on their family names. Many persons adopted family names after adopting coats of arms, and sometimes they ...


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First, you should have your comments in the question itself, paraphrased accordingly. Second, heraldry is an entire subject-matter, which requires expertise to understand the symbols. Finally, in order to avoid anachronistic interpretations, we should be aware that bestiary during the medieval period was not precise (emphasis mine): The bestiary was a ...


2

[This is in support of Luiz's answer, per comment, asking for sources] On the Trappists: They are a spin-off of the Cistercian order. It is not surpising that Trappists do visitations (to other monasteries) and attend annual General Chapters. This is in fact a requirement of the Order of the Cistercian, based on their constitution, Carta Caritatis (Latin ...


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the Thai lakorn/historical drama Sri Ayodhaya It's more lakorn and a LOT of historical propaganda rather than a historical drama, to be honest. and in one episode, this one professor said that Ayutthaya was an incredibly wealthy and powerful kingdom All incredibly wealthy and powerful kingdoms were eventually defeated. The kingdoms of Ayutthaya, ...


2

Here are some other historical questions that user 69268 could ask: How was Ninevah, capital of the mighty Neo Assyrian Empire, captured and destroyed by the revolting Medes, Persians, Babylonians, Chaldeans, Scythians, and Cimmerians in 612 BC? How was Babylon, capital of the mighty Neo Babylonian Empire, captured by the Persians in 539 BC? How as ...


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You're thinking of Henry of Huntingdon, a 12th century historian. The quote begins, "Now I speak to you who will be living in the third millennium..."


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The issue with finding other similar works is that barely any of it survived to this day except as references in documents: Little physical evidence survives to reconstruct the early development of English embroidery before the Norman Conquest of 1066. Stitches reinforcing the seams of a garment in the Sutton Hoo ship burial may have been intended as ...


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