65

Alexander Watson says more about this in chapter 7 of The Cambridge History of the First World War, Volume II: The State: The Germans were most sparing in applying the death penalty because their justice system was staffed by professional legal personnel and influenced more than that of other forces by civilian norms. Their courts’ concern with ...


12

In a 1960 article Pigeons in a Pelican, B. F. Skinner gave an account of his experiments, the problems he encountered and how they were overcome. The details are too lengthy to cite in full here, but his final demonstration (1944) before the project was rejected shows that - on an experimental level in a laboratory - the system showed promise. A later ...


9

Skinner's work was pretty good, but in his analysis on why it was discarded he might be ignoring several factors outside of his area of expertise. First of all - while in his " Pigeons in Pelican" article Skinner states that no other guidance system existed for the bomb, in fact, Pelican already had two of them - televised and semi-active radar homing; ...


6

By combining the three tables, of known Me262 losses; claims by USAAF; and claims by RAF, in Foreman, Me 262 Combat Diary (1990), assuming that the German numbers are correct, and also that all the dates are as stated, I have obtained the following statistics. In some cases both USAAF & RAF claim the same Me262, and in one case it is not clear which type ...


5

Conceivably you could do it the hard way by starting with the Register of Commissioned and Warrant Officer in 1897 (yes, I know, Massachusetts was commissioned in 1896, but after the register for that year was published) and check the entries on the captains’ list, for the most part, since battleships are usually commanded by captains, every year until 1919. ...


3

This summarizes my since-deleted comments into a slightly more coherent form. It is only a partial answer to the originally posed question, and relies on the photographs the OP added after their original post. The uniform is Czech; the bearer was at some point an NCO. The cap badge has the overall shape of a tilted square containing a smaller square region,...


3

You could try the The Library of Congress or the National Museum of American History. There is also a war museum along the same lines, but I cannot remember its name. In the worst case scenario, there are professors in big universities that may know such information. If you can get a call in, you can call the NAVY All hail the USS Roosevelt. It's my ...


2

Question: Were Israeli-arab conflicts in the Cold war testing grounds for NATO and Warsaw Pact equipment? Short Answer: Mostly no, but in the end yes. More Detailed Answer: The cold war lasted from 1947 – 1991. The Arab Israili wars during that time period were 1948–49: Israel’s War Of Independence - No US Military Aid 1956: Suez Crisis ...


2

I am curious when the transition happened During World War 1. This is covered by the Wikipedia article For the UK: During World War I, Major Hesketh Hesketh-Prichard ... developed many of the modern techniques in sniping, including the use of spotting scopes and working in pairs It cites Prichard, Hesketh; Vernon, Hesketh (2004). Sniping in France ...


2

3 megatons. The Source I've seen quoted in several places is the one calculated by the Center for Arms Control and Non Proliferation given below. quotes: Bulletin of the Atomic Scientists The total blast power of World War II has been calculated as three megatons by the International Commission on Nuclear Non-Proliferation and Disarmament. . ...


2

Here are some other historical questions that user 69268 could ask: How was Ninevah, capital of the mighty Neo Assyrian Empire, captured and destroyed by the revolting Medes, Persians, Babylonians, Chaldeans, Scythians, and Cimmerians in 612 BC? How was Babylon, capital of the mighty Neo Babylonian Empire, captured by the Persians in 539 BC? How as ...


2

I have found what appears to be a close match to your ancestors uniform. A plate found on the site weaponsandwarfare.com shows a soldier from the French 8th dragoons, circa 1827, which has many matching characteristics. The details which seem to closely match would include the shape of the symbol on the belt buckle and medal on the sash, button count and ...


2

The Haith Trust maintains a catalogue of online historical copies of the U.S. Navy Registers for Officers both active duty and reserve From Cornell University's compilation of the 1896-1900 Register of the Navy of the United States on page 446, corresponding to page 110 of the January 1, 1898 Register. On page 131 of the same register we find the squadron ...


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