52

There are a few recorded instances of Soviet penal troops being intentionally sent over mines, at least according to survivors: It is hard to judge whether there was a deliberate sacrifice of penal soldiers, but Pyl’tsyn describes how Batov, commander of the army to which his penal battalion was attached, deliberately sent its soldiers—all of them ...


13

The American and British army commanders made some mistakes that are clear in retrospect (and Mark Clark's error, with respect to winning the war, in going for Rome rather than cutting off and destroying the Germans retreating from Monte Cassino was obvious at the time). They tend to look less competent than the German generals, and there are historical ...


13

It's not specifically Roman, but the time frame is similar: I recommend Donald W. Engels, Alexander the Great and the Logistics of the Macedonian Army, University of California Press, 1978. The short version: Alexander and his generals had an extremely keen grasp of the logistical requirements of his army. He would send out advance detachments that ...


10

I suggest you read Part III of Just Deserts: Roman Military Operations in Arid Environments (108 BC–AD 400) (Melissa Beattie, 2011, MPhil thesis from Cardiff University). It has a lot of good points about Roman and overall desert logistics and might be exactly what you need. I'll link to a pdf or you can search for yourself on google.


7

Soviets were generally tactically inept in WW2, but wanted rapid advance First, let's quickly look at Red Army situation before WW2 and in early months of the conflict in the East. Red Army was expanding in late 1930's and early 1940's as were practically all European (and even world) armies, preparing for conflict that seemed inevitable. Rapid expansion ...


5

Recent authors of books about WWII that cover mostly allied point of view, like Anthony Beevor or Rick Atkinson, are quite critic of Allied commanders (like Patton, Montgomery or Clark), specially because they were interested on looking good, get fame or solve personal issues. For example: Mark Clark forced his army to reach Rome before D-Day, because he ...


4

It seems to be Polish. https://dobroni.pl/fotka-historyczna/14000 This drawing I found shows a uniform that has more accessories, and this may lead to confusion. I assume your photo pictures a young private with low or no grades. Another picture of a Polish soldier clearly shows similar numbers on the collar: https://ar.pinterest.com/pin/...


4

Circumstances more then lack of talent Allied troops and commanders were mostly "green". Vast majority of commanders in France of 1944 never had opportunity to lead large formations (armies, corps, divisions) in the field. Some had experience from Northern Africa and Italy (Omar Bradley, Bernard Montgomery ...) but even that was on different terrain, ...


3

Since you already have a confirmed WW1 US uniform for this individual, there is little reason to suspect this uniform is not also US Army. Unfortunatly, this image seems horribly overexposed, so details which might help us identify unit or rank are not distinguisable (to my eye at least). Trying first to confirm the hat style as occurring on late 19th or ...


2

No, no bayonets. They wouldn't have had a spot to put them, as they had a special uniform type for off-duty, the 'walking-out' uniform. The primary difference with this uniform was the fact that it had a plain white belt -no weapon sheaths. From the Victorian Uniform Guide for one particular unit(all emphasis mine): Walking Out Belt - A P71 buff leather ...


1

One point which has not been mentioned yet... it has been alleged that Soviet industry provided export versions of hardware (tanks, etc) referred to as 'monkey models' which were inferior to the variants issued to Soviet troops proper. The first use of the term is credited to Vladimir Bogdanovich Rezun (pen name 'Viktor Suvorov'), a Soviet intelligence ...


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