13

The British bombardment of Copenhagen in September 1807, to deny to the French the possible use of the Danish fleet, seems to fit the bill. The impacts, explosions, and fires resulted in nearly 1,000 direct civilian casualties in a neutral country. It also delayed and nearly ended attempts to publish the first modern edition of Beowulf, due to scholarly ...


8

Your question is premised on some incorrect assumptions: Casualties were not that high. The U.S. Army enlisted over 11 million men and suffered less than 500,000 killed and MIA, only a bit more wounded (but many of whom returned to service). Overall percentage killed was 2.2%. Yes, the U.S. military is known for its long tail, but even for the pointy end of ...


7

Moving away from some of the more obvious examples which are easily googled (and focusing on Africa, which gets far too little attention on History SE), consider Queen Amina of the Hausa state of Zazzau (in what is now northern Nigeria). Information on her comes mostly (but not exclusively) from the Kano chronicle. Leaving aside more legendary accounts, ...


4

A quick sum up of my guessings: He's clearly wearing mounting boots and a sam browne style belt, so you might have to look trough officers or cavalry units, or maybe rifles. I tried to identify the cuffs with some unit, as they are damn singular ( or so i think ). Brittish army cuffs at that time (1900-1914) don't usually show a striked or zig-zagged ...


4

Searching the British Gazette archive from 01/01/1880 through 31/12/1905 for military records of both McLennan and MacLennan with first name Alexander or Duncan (or initial A. and/or D.) yields sparse results: Commissioning of Alexander MacLennan, Gent., as Second Lieutenant in the 1st Lanarkshire Volunteer Rifle Corps effective 11th May, 1881 Captain A. P. ...


4

Aetheflaed comes to mind if for no other reason than that she militarized bees. Æthelred died in 911 and Æthelflæd then ruled Mercia as Lady of the Mercians. The accession of a female ruler in Mercia is described by the historian Ian Walker as "one of the most unique events in early medieval history". Alfred had built a network of fortified burhs and ...


4

History is full with those examples. Feel free to add more to the list: Typical case is the nomadic or semi-nomadic tribe that loots an agrarian country, they invade, loot and retreat. Good example are the gauls that sacked ancient Rome. Vikings raids where basically a loot of territory to later retreat to the sea. Vandals (another sack of Rome) and ...


4

Filibusters "normally act without official authority from their own government". The paramount example, William Walker, invaded Baja California in 1853 and then Central America in 1855, in each case leading from San Francisco military expeditions of only a few dozen men. Though prosecuted for waging war in a private capacity, he was quickly acquitted. In his ...


4

The Athenian destruction of Melos in 416 BC during the Peloponnesian War damaged Sparta's image and interests. Thucydides (see the Melian dialogue) asserts that the motive for the Athenian attack on the neutral island of Melos was to demonstrate its power and send a message to potentially rebellious states that resistance to a greater power was futile. ...


3

A rather large portion of the funds for the Chinese Navy in the late 19th century was redirected towards restoring the summer palace in Beijing, including the famous Marble boat: https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Marble_Boat


2

I suggest you read "Just Deserts: Roman Military Operations in Arid Environments (108 BC-AD 400)" Part III. It has a lot of good points about Roman and overall desert logistics and might be exactly what you need. I'll link to a pdf or you can search for yourself on google.


2

There was a Persian satrap called Mania. She became satrap in 399 BC. Polyaenus says in Strategems Mania, the wife of Zenis prince of Dardanus, governed the realm after the death of her husband, with the assistance of Pharnabazus. She always went to battle, drawn in a chariot; she gave her orders at the time of action, formed her lines, and rewarded ...


2

Your criteria is an entirely unreasonable scale for judging success. The appropriate scale would be in the approximate range of Company to Battalion scale: one to five hundred men against a similarly sized foe. In this sense the Saudi take over of Riyadh* and the U.S. Marine attack on Tripoli* in the First Barbary War are valid examples. The key skills ...


2

Belgium (and it's historical antecedents) is the roadway that everyone tramples through to get at each other. Leaving it worse off than before and leaving it for the other guys to pick up and dust off is par for the course. Palestine (in all its various names and shapes) and, as need demands, extending up into Lebanon and Syria, is like Belgium but worse. ...


1

Here is a list, non exhaustive: Queen Cleopatra: not a great military commander, but a famous at the battle of Actium Queen Bouddica: in Britanny, she fought the Roman Empire In Sicily, when the Normans hold it: Sykelgaite of Salerne and Adelaïde of Montferrat, fighting multiple nobles Rani Lakshmi Bai in the 19th century, against the British in India Ching ...


Only top voted, non community-wiki answers of a minimum length are eligible