48

Purely fictional. I have never heard of such an incident and, as with the large, bright red insignia painted on the conning towers, it puts the submarine in unnecessary danger for no advantage. In order to transmit, a U-Boat must be on or near the surface putting them in obvious danger to visual spotting and radar. While the first two transmissions come at ...


10

There is a tale of communication between a convoy and a Luftwaffe aircraft. The convoy was one of the Arctic convoys to the USSR, the aircraft was a BV 138 flying boat. That kind of plane had no business attacking a convoy with decent anti-aircraft armament; its job was to stay in sight of the convoy and transmit homing signals for U-boats and strike ...


8

Short answer, Yes. A quick perusal of AVG pilot listings compared to USN or USMC postings after the AVG was disbanded shows some . . . Noel R Bacon – Served in NAOTC at NAAS Green Cove Spring, LCDR USNR (post war he was a CDR and commanded VC-62) Bronze Star Percy R Bartelt – served in NAOTC at NAS Pensacola, LT USNR, promoted to LCDR 5 November 1945 Lewis ...


7

I convert my comment into an answer: No, absolutely not. Taunting, as in the movie, would have been a death sentence for the U Boat. The Germans were well aware about High Frequency Direction Finding or HF/DF. They knew any conversation lasting longer than 20 seconds was highly dangerous. They didn't know the exact specifications, but more than enough to ...


7

This is a partial answer. This looks like a German Hussar uniform, as shown on the web page. This style of jacket (called an "Atilla") seems to be a distinct part of the uniform of Hussars. The cap badge is distinctly German. But the German Army had many Hussar regiments, and I don't know how to tell the rank. Their youthful appearance, and the ...


7

This can be explained by organisational history, but for different reasons in the US and Canadian contexts. The British system, where the RAF has distinct names, arises from the origins of the RAF in 1918. It was formed by merging the Army and Navy air wings, which were until then using their original rank structures. The new service's ranks were newly ...


7

Not as such. But there were stronger and weaker cohorts. When a Roman legion of this period deployed for battle, the default formation was to arrange the cohorts in two rows from right to left. That is, the first and sixth cohorts would be on the right flank, while the fifth and tenth on the left. See the following illustration from Vox: As you deduced, one ...


7

Did anyone ever do this? In a pinch, probably. Was this typical tactics for a unit of archers in warfare? No. Individual archers in a unit weren't trained to aim at specific other individuals in an opposite unit. Instead units were trained to fire gigantic volleys of arrows (or alternately a continuous fire-at-will rain) into the mass of opposing units. ...


6

I witnessed the Israeli Iron Dome system, a missile-based C-RAM (ie. CIWS on land), working very well against rocket attacks. In 2015 I was in Israel working on a project near Tel Aviv. Rockets were being fired from Gaza regularly. The Iron Dome worked perfectly several times during the 3 months that I was there. The system would not fire an interceptor ...


6

Yes, it was assumed that an alliance was being formed during the visit of the French fleet (23rd of July 1891) in Kronstadt. Due to the 2 week celebrations in the last half of October 1893, where a Russian naval squadron made a return visit to the French fleet in Toulon, it was assumed that an military alliance had been completed. France–Russia relations ...


5

Yes, but probably not as portrayed Did they communicate with Allied ships? Yes. Taunt them? Maybe, but it's not documented as far as I know. During both World Wars, Germany observed, intermittently, the "Prize Rules," which governed attacks on merchant (not military) ships. While the Prize Rules were in effect, submarines were required to ...


5

It matches the description of a US M70 57mm AP-T (Armor Piercing with Tracer) shot which has lost its rifling band. The M70 AP Projectile is a solid shot of hardened steel with a cavity machined into the base to receive a tracer. The ogive is continued to a point, and has a radius of 3.14 inches. A waved or knurled recess 0.79 inch wide is machined into the ...


5

Nobody knows. Historians debate this, as what surviving Latin documents we have are either ambiguous; or presuppose knowledge which has been lost over time; or both. Beyond the broad layout as (depending on period) cohorts, maniples, and centuries, in lines of hastati, principes and triarii in the earlier period, we know little beyond Caesar choosing to &...


4

WP:Mutual assured destruction states: By the time of the 1962 Cuban Missile Crisis, both the United States and the Soviet Union had developed the capability of launching a nuclear-tipped missile from a submerged submarine, which completed the "third leg" of the nuclear triad weapons strategy necessary to fully implement the MAD doctrine. The ...


4

According to "the Adoption History Project" the answer is to whether it was permitted is "yes": Every state in the country currently allows single adults to adopt children. This may be less surprising than the fact that singles have been legally eligible to adopt since the first adoption laws were passed in the mid-nineteenth century. ...


4

A Picture's Worth A Thousand Words... Why did the US Navy and Marine Corps use satanic symbolism in WW2? Ultimately for the same reason it's still using it today; as such, the real question would be why not? [T]he U.S. was largely [a] Christian country at that time. Which would probably explain why they heavily employed Christian symbolism associated ...


4

I'm assuming that generals and admirals are less skilled or prepared to pilot aircraft, as their primary duty is management and leadership, not flying. Generals and admirals weren't always generals and admirals. As we'll see below, many are very distinguished pilots. And while you're correct that their primary duty is management and leadership, when the ...


4

Tradition Consider the rank of captain. It comes up both in the Navy and in the Army. It is also used in civilian shipping and aviation, and even figuratively as in "captain of industry." Once upon a time, both a company commander in the ground forces and a ship commander in the naval forces were called captain. The deputy of a captain was the ...


4

The ten-pointed star on the lapel, and cap form makes this image readily identifiable to anyone familiar with the American Legion organization. The three digit number indicates the 'Post' the individual belonged to, with this one indicating a connection to Johnston, Polk County, Iowa (part of Des Moines metro area). Not enough detail at this resolution to ...


4

Based on the Russian Army in the Great War Article (provided by LarsBosteen), which seems to analyze the Journals of the 1900,1901,1906-08,10-13 general staff meetings. (Note: it may be necessary to remove the "https://" from the start of the link in order to avoid a 404 error.) Since this article goes into great details, it can be assumed that ...


3

I was going to comment, but decided to answer instead. It’s plausible a few German U-boats DID taunt allied ships during WW 2, but it was also a dangerous gamble which could cost the entire U-boat their lives with little reward... As illustrated in Greyhound, where all the U-boats died. There are, however, several factors working against the scenario, ...


3

I think radar made a huge difference to the valiant English who were fighting the nazis single handedly. With radar they could scramble planes; without it, the only way would have been to keep planes always in the air in multiple locations and of course they lacked men, machines and fuel for this. So this was a practical "weapon" (actually ...


2

Interservice rivalry. No branch of the military is going to give up its traditions in favor of those of another branch. But for practical purposes, they do have common designations, as shown on the top line of that image. 2nd lieutenants and ensigns are both O-1, colonels and captains both O-6, and so on.


2

I am imagining the picture is stylized and not drawn to scale. Depending on how close the shield on the ramp was placed to the gates of the city, the shield would do two things: Offer some protection to the attacking side from arrows and other projectiles dispatched by the defenders. Hide the attackers from the defenders so the defenders didn't know what ...


2

What exactly is a miracle weapon? My definition would be: something that all of a sudden changes the outcome of a conflict and decides a war. Hannibal used clay pots filled with snakes to be thrown on the decks of enemy vessels. That's not a miracle weapon because it decided the outcome of a battle, but not the war. I see artillery not as a miracle weapon ...


1

Greased buttocks at Salamis. You laugh - but shouldn't. Many historians have long believed that the Greeks greased their buttocks as trireme rowers, allowing them much of the advantage of a modern rowing seat albeit at the expense of painful hemorrhoids later. This allowed the Greeks vessels to attain both a significantly faster ramming speed, and to faster ...


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